Wildfire evacuation plan? - Page 4 - The Horse Forum
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post #31 of 40 Old 08-06-2017, 03:42 PM
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If there was a fire here, I'd move the horses out of their field. Burn it, and put them back in. It can't burn twice.
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post #32 of 40 Old 08-06-2017, 04:20 PM
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Earthquake destroyed our house. Torrential rains took out our road. I still say fire is the worst.

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post #33 of 40 Old 08-06-2017, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkdog View Post
If there was a fire here, I'd move the horses out of their field. Burn it, and put them back in. It can't burn twice.
Not an option if the fire in your field will then burn off your property or take your home out-- and that's even saying you have time to burn it, get the ground cooled, and put the horses back. The fire we helped evacuate horses from started at 3 pm and by 3:30 evacuation orders had been posted and people were hauling out. That's not time to burn off a pasture to save your horses.
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post #34 of 40 Old 08-06-2017, 06:27 PM
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My Father-in-law's cropland borders a draft horse show barn's property. Last fall, a train passing through on the south side of that field sparked a fire, which caught the dry stalks left in the field as the corn had already been harvested. In 10 minutes, that field was a wall of flames and burning toward the horse farm a mile away driven by wind. My FIL was called immediately by another neighbor, and he, two other neighbors, and a passer-by were out plowing a fire break around the horse property to try to save it within minutes, and passers-by were helping carry items out of the house and grabbing halters and catching horses. Thankfully, there were three trailers on the property and people simply backed up pickups, hitched, and started loading horses. Since the show semi trailer was already hitched, horses were being loaded in that, too, and hauled out-- Amish neighbors were spraying water on the buildings and soaking horses and leading them out tied behind buggies. Other neighbors were cutting down the dry pine trees south of the house that, if caught, would have ignited the house, which would have ingited the barn.

Thanks to quick action by all and the fire department, the fire jumped the fire break in only one spot, and only one pasture was burned and the buildings were saved. Every horse was gotten out safely in under 20 minutes-- including show horses, broodmares, breeding stallions, foals, weanlings and yearlings. Had the fire caught the house and barn, no horses would have been hurt. Even the farm dogs and all but one cat had been caught and removed. It's a sobering thought that had someone not seen the fire when they did, had people not dropped everything to help, had the farm equipment been put away for the winter and not easily put into service to plow that fire line, and had the horses not all been so easy to catch, handle, and load the outcome could have been very different. To top it off, the property owners were not home-- they were at a birthday party for a friend and 40 miles away while they almost lost their farm and horses and livelihood.

Even if you don't live in a 'fire area' fires can happen.

Last edited by SilverMaple; 08-06-2017 at 06:35 PM.
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post #35 of 40 Old 08-06-2017, 07:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverMaple View Post
Not an option if the fire in your field will then burn off your property or take your home out-- and that's even saying you have time to burn it, get the ground cooled, and put the horses back. The fire we helped evacuate horses from started at 3 pm and by 3:30 evacuation orders had been posted and people were hauling out. That's not time to burn off a pasture to save your horses.
You assume some things here. I live 3 miles up a canyon. If a fire starts at the bottom, there's no way out. I have a pond in the field with an acre of swamp around it that couldn't burn with napalm. I've thought this through, believe me. If the cabin goes, that's what insurance is for. My biggest concern would be the smoke.
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post #36 of 40 Old 08-18-2017, 08:45 PM
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I didn't read other replies. But, I just wanted to jump in and say that I live in an "extreme risk" area for wildfires. As of today there are 138 wildfires burning north of me, some farther north than others, but all within the province, and being south, we are still considered very high risk.

So, personally, if we had to evacuate, I'd rent a trailer and haul my horses out myself. I don't own a trailer anymore, no need for it at this point. It would be nice to have one again, but it would literally sit 365 days a year unless we were evacuated (which hasn't happened in recent years at all). There are a few rental places around, and an abundance of commercial companies that will haul out during emergency situations, so I wouldn't be too worried. Absolute worst case scenario, I'd spray paint my number on them, and braid ID tags into their manes.
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post #37 of 40 Old 08-18-2017, 09:24 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by beverleyy View Post
I didn't read other replies. But, I just wanted to jump in and say that I live in an "extreme risk" area for wildfires. As of today there are 138 wildfires burning north of me, some farther north than others, but all within the province, and being south, we are still considered very high risk.

So, personally, if we had to evacuate, I'd rent a trailer and haul my horses out myself. I don't own a trailer anymore, no need for it at this point. It would be nice to have one again, but it would literally sit 365 days a year unless we were evacuated (which hasn't happened in recent years at all). There are a few rental places around, and an abundance of commercial companies that will haul out during emergency situations, so I wouldn't be too worried. Absolute worst case scenario, I'd spray paint my number on them, and braid ID tags into their manes.
Luckily, the fire risk has passed here. As I've said before, we really don't live in a high risk area. But things got dry for a bit, and I got worried, so I'm grateful for the advice that will allow me to plan for any eventuality! I don't own a trailer either because I only use one about 3-5 times a year. But I know many people who do, and who could help us out if there was a real threat. Hopefully it will never be necessary!
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post #38 of 40 Old 08-19-2017, 11:11 AM
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When we had that hurricane come up our way last year, we turned the horses out in the big pasture where flying debris would be minimal and no trees to come down on them. I did not want to leave halters on them so I bought plastic tags for tagging cows ears and braided them into the mane with baling twine and then wrapped it up with electrical tape so it would stay put. We put three cell phone numbers on every tag. The permanent marker that I used lasted for over a month. I know this because it took that long for one of the borders to get around to taking it off of her horse.
Spray painting would be a good option but a lot messier and anyone who wanted to keep your horse or send them off to slaughter could easily fix that problem with a pair of clippers anyway.
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post #39 of 40 Old 08-19-2017, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Acadianartist View Post
Luckily, the fire risk has passed here. As I've said before, we really don't live in a high risk area. But things got dry for a bit, and I got worried, so I'm grateful for the advice that will allow me to plan for any eventuality! I don't own a trailer either because I only use one about 3-5 times a year. But I know many people who do, and who could help us out if there was a real threat. Hopefully it will never be necessary!
Ah that's good the risk has passed! I totally understand wanting to be prepared and have a plan "just in case". Even though we live in an extreme risk area, where my horses are is not likely to burn, it could happen, but our immediate area it isn't super likely, but totally possible. We're also a huge risk for floods here, so it's good for me to have tentative plans in place if we start getting flood warnings. We do flood regularly, but haven't had a bad enough one that would require evacuation of the area in a good 10+ years.
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post #40 of 40 Old 08-19-2017, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by beverleyy View Post
Ah that's good the risk has passed! I totally understand wanting to be prepared and have a plan "just in case". Even though we live in an extreme risk area, where my horses are is not likely to burn, it could happen, but our immediate area it isn't super likely, but totally possible. We're also a huge risk for floods here, so it's good for me to have tentative plans in place if we start getting flood warnings. We do flood regularly, but haven't had a bad enough one that would require evacuation of the area in a good 10+ years.
Yes, floods are a problem near us, where there are several barns on a flood plain (they probably should have thought that through...). One year, they had to move all their horses because of rising waters. Here, it's not a problem because we're up high on a hill, and my barn is even higher.

Biggest issue we are likely to have are really long power outages due to snow/ice storms, but that's something we're somewhat used to. A day or two without power is fine, but it was out for 11 days once. This is why I have a paddock with a top board so there is a safe place for the horses if we can't power up the electric fence. And of course, their heated buckets wouldn't work, so I'd have to haul water from the house several times a day. We do have a generator in the house, and a wood stove so we can pretty much stay here indefinitely even in very cold weather - though it has happened that gas stations were closed too, and people had to travel pretty far to get gas for their generators. It sounds apocalyptic, but we're so used to it here, it's no big deal.

Fire is just not something that normally happens here, so I got pretty worried when things were drying up and wildfires starting popping up. None near me, luckily, but it got me thinking.
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