The "X" Factor(s) in Horse Buying - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 02:15 PM
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When I go shopping I'm usually looking for potential breeding animals and I'm not looking for anything over 2 years old, most of the time. I can have a list a mile long of what I want, and that whole list can go right out the window when I find just what I need.

We still laugh about when I went to a production sale and was looking for:

Filly, preferably under 2 y.o.
Bay, minimal white
Cow bred

and I came home with Honey Boo Boo.

A mare
8 years old
In foal to a stallion I wouldn't have bred to on a bet
Chestnut,
LOTS of white
Halter bred
In fact, 16+ hands and 1400 lbs of halter mare



She's given me 2 awesome babies so far, including the one by the stallion I didn't care for, and I can't wait to see the one she gives me next year. The longer I have this mare, the better I like her. She wasn't what I wanted, but she sure enough was what I needed.

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post #22 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 02:27 PM Thread Starter
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My "zing" picker is absolutely NO GOOD. Lol. If I went with my zing, I'd be in a pretty bad situation right now and probably not able to ride my own horse. As a newbie, I fall in love with the "idea" of the horse I want too quickly.

Right now, I am relying totally on my trainer to assess when I'm ready and then any horse I am considering. In the meantime, there is always a lease option available to me.
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post #23 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 05:53 PM
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My heart went "zing" for a lovely horse my daughter tried out recently. On the ground, he was such a charmer. Inquisitive, beautiful head, intelligent and kind. But then my daughter rode him and afterwards, she said she thought he was "wonky" (she's 10, lol). So I brought in the coach and within a few minutes, I knew this horse wasn't the one. So did my daughter. I guess my point is that if I had let my feelings get in the way of logic, I would have bought a major problem and put my daughter at risk.
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post #24 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 10:10 PM
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There is a big difference between want and need. When I was taking lessons as a teenager there were certain horses that I wanted to ride but would always find myself having to ride others. That was probably a very good thing in the long run because I learned how to ride each horse differently. When I stopped showing my needs changed and I no longer needed a specific "type". The only criteria then was a feeling that I could connect with the horse and it pass a vet exam. They did come in a variety, and few took awhile before they were enjoyable to ride but I only made a mistake on buying a horse once. It was a very pretty grade QH mare needing a little fine tuning but broke well enough and priced dirt cheap because the owner was in a jam. There was a wall between her and I from the very beginning although she really never gave me a problem. I did not enjoy owning her and sold her for a little more than I paid. I don't think I am the average horse buyer but I don't think "perfect" when I am shopping. If I can form a partnership with a horse and it's faults are something I can live with or overcome, that's good enough.
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post #25 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 11:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tihannah View Post
My "zing" picker is absolutely NO GOOD. Lol. If I went with my zing, I'd be in a pretty bad situation right now and probably not able to ride my own horse. As a newbie, I fall in love with the "idea" of the horse I want too quickly.

Right now, I am relying totally on my trainer to assess when I'm ready and then any horse I am considering. In the meantime, there is always a lease option available to me.
I don't have one either so don't worry lol
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post #26 of 32 Old 09-26-2015, 11:12 PM
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I have a tendency to fall for sorrel foundation bred quarter horse mares with a little bit of chrome on them. If they have a bit of an attitude I like them even better. Seems like they'll move heaven and earth to do whatever you ask once you work them through that attitude.
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post #27 of 32 Old 09-27-2015, 02:50 AM
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I never intended to horse shop, and most definitely didn't have a "zing" when I saw my now-horse Sky.

He too was a failed Therapy Horse. Spookiness is a complete understatement.. he once tore down a fence, an old barn, and broke every halter he owned. And that's just before I met him. While I knew him, he bolted, spooked violently, rubbed someone off on the fence, ran away with someone and they consequently broke their back (but recovered, we're still in touch), tried attacking the farrier, and killed a few pairs of crossties.

Needless to say, he was a MESS. I despised him because everyone thought he was pretty and spoiled him with treats. He was muggy because of it, which just further set me off.

I thought I was a know it all (ha!) and for some reason my then-boss and trainer put me in charge of lunging Sky, her personal horse due to the failed therapy use. Then the same day he broke someone's back, she had me get on him and ride him out of his spookiness. Besides being a giraffe, he was fine. I barely knew how to post at the time

Fast forward, I began to lease him and I had no real thoughts of buying him but I did see him as a challenge and he became really interesting to work with. We began to bond, without me seeing it. Many people tried to buy him but he was always returned because he was uncontrollable and unpredictable. I kept leasing him until one day my trainer gave him to me because she saw what I didn't see, that he had chosen me.

He was definitely NOT the horse to buy, he barely stood for a bath let alone let you pick his hooves. Putting on polo wraps was a marathon of trouble... let alone his manners under saddle (remember I didn't know what I was doing, and somehow managed not to die)

So I can't say for sure what indicators lead to ending up with the perfect horse. He's exactly what I need, but in the beginning he was FAR from it. A horse that sounds good in an ad may not be the horse for you. That dead broke horse may not be the horse for you.

Horse purchasing is a gamble, because it's not a car that stays stoic throughout, it's a being that has the ability to be influenced and change. Just as with people, not all click.

My advice? Lease before buying, just like the OP is doing.
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post #28 of 32 Old 09-30-2015, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians View Post
That's the kind of trainer you want, that can teach you how to get control, stay in control and regain control when the horse tries to lose it.
My horse can spook at times at very random things when Im here with. When she does this, she doesnt care and will often come into me. I yank the lead real hard to get her attention then I wallop her real hard with the end of the lead on the hind usuall
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post #29 of 32 Old 09-30-2015, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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From what I understand, smacking her on the hind with a lead would be telling her to move her feet? This trainer told me she specifically pops them on the shoulder. It doesn't hurt, but this striking this area is just a means to bring the horse's attention back to you and not the scary thing.
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post #30 of 32 Old 09-30-2015, 01:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoofpic View Post
My horse can spook at times at very random things when Im here with. When she does this, she doesnt care and will often come into me. I yank the lead real hard to get her attention then I wallop her real hard with the end of the lead on the hind usuall
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tihannah View Post
From what I understand, smacking her on the hind with a lead would be telling her to move her feet? This trainer told me she specifically pops them on the shoulder. It doesn't hurt, but this striking this area is just a means to bring the horse's attention back to you and not the scary thing.
I smack on the chest if he's trying to plow into me and then we back up HARD for a good 15 ft.

To each their own, whatever works lol

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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