BLM burro usefulness? - The Horse Forum
 96Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 32 Old 02-20-2020, 10:09 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 465
• Horses: 0
BLM burro usefulness?

Just about every advertisement to adopt a BLM animal says "adopt a wild horse or burro," yet it seems no one ever really takes consideration of the burros nearly as much as the horses. I'm finding it incredibly difficult to find online accounts of people adopting burros. That doesn't come without good reason... Anything a burro can do, a horse can do better, is what I bet most people think. After all, horses tend to be taller, more compliant, more versatile, easier to train, and less noisy.

But burros must have some sort of usefulness, even if it does take a bit more patience to train them. Given their height, they're probably not going to be much use ridden, but they can surely pack, pull a cart, pony alongside a buddy-sour horse on the trails, give more level-headed pasture companionship to a nervous horse than another horse could provide, or defend smaller livestock from predators.

The only thing I found in my online searches was this, which I got a good laugh from: Pack Burro Racing

Has anyone/would anyone ever consider taking home a burro?
AnitaAnne, SueC and WildAbtHorses like this.
Aprilswissmiss is offline  
post #2 of 32 Old 02-20-2020, 10:57 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Southeast
Posts: 9,043
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aprilswissmiss View Post
Just about every advertisement to adopt a BLM animal says "adopt a wild horse or burro," yet it seems no one ever really takes consideration of the burros nearly as much as the horses. I'm finding it incredibly difficult to find online accounts of people adopting burros. That doesn't come without good reason... Anything a burro can do, a horse can do better, is what I bet most people think. After all, horses tend to be taller, more compliant, more versatile, easier to train, and less noisy.

But burros must have some sort of usefulness, even if it does take a bit more patience to train them. Given their height, they're probably not going to be much use ridden, but they can surely pack, pull a cart, pony alongside a buddy-sour horse on the trails, give more level-headed pasture companionship to a nervous horse than another horse could provide, or defend smaller livestock from predators.

The only thing I found in my online searches was this, which I got a good laugh from: Pack Burro Racing

Has anyone/would anyone ever consider taking home a burro?
Loved the pack burro race!!

Have always wanted to have one, but never enough room or time
SueC and Aprilswissmiss like this.
AnitaAnne is offline  
post #3 of 32 Old 02-20-2020, 10:58 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Southeast
Posts: 9,043
• Horses: 0
@SueC has some gorgeous donkeys!!! Maybe she will post some pictures and give advice
SueC and Aprilswissmiss like this.
AnitaAnne is offline  
post #4 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 12:54 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Montana
Posts: 925
• Horses: 1
I would adopt a few if I had pasture space. I've always thought it would be fun to have a burro team to drive. Other than that, they'd probably just be companion animals, or maybe to pack with if I did a long hiking trip in the mountains. I wouldn't think they'd be good for like, packing packing, unless they have a super long stride and could keep up with a ridden horse? And they're definitely too big for me to ride, so that's out lol. But I think they're super cool.

-- Kai
Kaifyre is offline  
post #5 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 10:09 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 2,942
• Horses: 0
I love the idea of them. I saw a herd the other day in an unexpected place, and I was excited. I donít know that I would ever get one though, because I also canít quite figure the use I would have for one. We have tractors for work, although I am trying to play a bit with teaching horses that type of work.

I guess if a person did a lot of packing they would be a wonderful choice. They are very strong and surefooted. They are smarter about things than a horse, so they are more likely to be cautious (or so I hear).

Am I not your own donkey, which you have always ridden, to this day? Have I been in the habit of doing this to you? - Balaamís Donkey
Knave is offline  
post #6 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 10:43 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Toledo, Spain
Posts: 1,286
• Horses: 0
Not long ago, I saw a pair of burros pulling a cart on the road here in La Mancha, Spain (Don Quijote land). The cart was painted bright green and the burritos were adorned with jingle bells, pulling two men and a load of firewood. So much fun to see! I was so upset that I was driving and could not get my phone out to take a picture!

For many years, I have thought that keeping a couple of minis would be my plan for when I get to an age/condition that I can no longer ride. Now I am seriously thinking of burritos.
Spanish Rider is online now  
post #7 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 11:03 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 410
• Horses: 1
I bet they would make excellent pack animals for camping and other long trips where more equipment is needed, but I guess not very many people do that anymore. I recently saw a "pack saddle" for the first time, my barn owners have one they are getting a newer horse accustomed to wearing. But even they haven't used theirs in a long time because of kids, work, etc.

"I am the one thing in life I can control. I am inimitable I am an original. Iím not falling behind or running late. Iím not standing still I am lying in wait." - Wait For It
CopperLove is offline  
post #8 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 11:11 AM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: A good place
Posts: 8,483
• Horses: 0
I neighbor had a blm burro he let run with his heifer cures for livestock protection. It had a great life. Thousands of acres and no searching for food.

I could use one to pack salt to pastures, but that's only a few trips a year. And i guess the grandkids could ride one, but that's often what semi-retired ranch horses do.

They'd be a luxury for me.
boots is offline  
post #9 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 12:38 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: middle of nowhere
Posts: 4,004
• Horses: 3
A lot of places around here have a couple. Some are companions to older horses or ponies. Most of the farms that raise show cattle use a donkey to halter break calves. A couple of draft horse barns use one to halter break foals, too. The team ropers often have one to practice heeling. Used carefully, it doesn't hurt them as you don't dally when roping the donkey; just let him jog out of the loop and rebuild. Unfortunately, not everyone is kind to their donkeys, but they can be so useful for training a heel horse, if you get a good donkey, you treat him right because he can last for decades. A friend has a BLM burro in with her miniature horses as the burro keeps stray dogs away from the minis quite efficiently.

Here's an article on heeling a donkey: https://teamropingjournal.com/roping...heeling-donkey

And for halter-breaking: https://www.quarterhorsenews.com/201...-with-donkeys/

Last edited by SilverMaple; 02-21-2020 at 12:44 PM.
SilverMaple is offline  
post #10 of 32 Old 02-21-2020, 02:01 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 971
• Horses: 0
Once trained if you get a young enough one they make good pack animals. We used donkeys as pack animals in the Marine Corps. at the animal packing school up at Bridgeport. They are REALLY different than horses. If you stress them too much they will lock up and then it is pretty much game over for getting them to do anything until you get them to come down a bit and unlock which can take hours depending on how badly they got stressed or scared. They can pack a huge amount of weight relative to their size and can be really friendly if treated right. You need to keep anything smaller than them out of their pasture with a lot of them e.g. dogs, kids, calves etc. If you are going to use one to halter break something like a calf you do it in the calves pasture not the donkeys. They can be super territorial about their pasture space and some of them will try and kill anything smaller than them that comes into it, like your dog etc. They seem to be fine with colts, but other livestock and dogs especially not so much. Kind of the same deal as with mules, if you like your dogs staying alive, keep them out of the pasture.
boots and knightrider like this.

Anything worth doing, is worth doing well.
AndyTheCornbread is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










« What are they?? | - »
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome