Stallion Fencing - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 24 Old 07-03-2018, 05:31 AM
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when checking fencing for live stock you NEED to say its for a stallion. they can get volitile and fight out of a fence. you want something he can body slam and hold up. no climb will not. imagine you are putting a unhandle wild mustang in it. they dont know fencing and will run fill force into it or go over. Studs can do VERY stupid things to get to mares including forgetting to respect fencing.

also THIS right here is why wire fencing and t posts are NOT enough for most horses much less a stallion. note horse was fine


THIS is why you want a 6ft MINIMUM!

another example by a stallion

your fence needs to be able to withstand THIS type of behavior.
not saying the stallion WILL behave this way but they all CAN and sometimes do. you HAVE to be prepared for the worst. if that stud gets loose he can attack and kill geldings, go after people on horse back and breed mares that are NOT meant for him. he can cause ALOT of damage.

i will tell you as a mare owner who boarded with stallions i was always worried. one day the owners young stud got away from her and attacked a horse statue and DESTROYED IT because he thought it was another stallion! she has 5 stallions! what if i was walking my mare? what if he attacked me and hurt my mare because she was not in season? what if he bred her and i had to pay a vet to lute her? or worst what if it happened when i was not there and he got to my mare and no one told me?

stallions NEED proper containment. they CAN be just as dangerous as bulls. again there are some fantastic studs who behave better than some geldings, but they are animals ruled by their hormones. you HAVE to be ready.

now if you want to use the remaining t posts i would get livestock panels like i posted in the picture. the t posts will help them stay in place. again TALL livestock pannels.

here are some examples of stallion safe fencing.
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post #22 of 24 Old 07-03-2018, 08:32 AM
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Kiger if it isn't pipe fencing they can destroy it if the drive is there or themselves trying. That is why the electric in combination. A hot enough fence that is well maintained will deter them (well 99.9% of them). If you have that .1% you know it and you find another way to contain him, geld him or sell him to someone that has the means to contain him. Or if it is an aggression issue that is that dangerous and out of control you put them down. The best behaved stallions are those that are handled from birth to know how to act and have a handler that is 100% on his/her toes and ideally have their own herd whether it is being run with their own mares or a gelding band or even another stallion depending on the situation. Letting them be horses helps tremendously with their attitude and supports a healthy mentality and working relationship.
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post #23 of 24 Old 07-03-2018, 01:17 PM
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Here's what our fencing looks like. 6 ft high, with board on top, plus we have a strand of electrobraid that runs around the top on the inside of the board which keeps him away from it altogether. We also only put mares in pastures that have at least 2 fences, and a large area between those fences, between them and the stallion.

Our stallion is very laid back and is a good babysitter for the colts when we're weaning and will tolerate a gelding in with him, not all stallions are temperamentally suited for that. Frequently they have to be housed alone. If you've never had a stallion, never handled one, then I would suggest you go work on a breeding farm for a while before you invest in one. They create a LOT more work, even when they are the best tempered and behaved animals ever.
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post #24 of 24 Old 07-07-2018, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QtrBel View Post
Kiger if it isn't pipe fencing they can destroy it if the drive is there or themselves trying. That is why the electric in combination. A hot enough fence that is well maintained will deter them (well 99.9% of them). If you have that .1% you know it and you find another way to contain him, geld him or sell him to someone that has the means to contain him. Or if it is an aggression issue that is that dangerous and out of control you put them down. The best behaved stallions are those that are handled from birth to know how to act and have a handler that is 100% on his/her toes and ideally have their own herd whether it is being run with their own mares or a gelding band or even another stallion depending on the situation. Letting them be horses helps tremendously with their attitude and supports a healthy mentality and working relationship.

im aware and i personally dont have studs as i dont breed. but my emphasis is the type and strength. i have seen nice laid back studs get stupid. you want your basis covered and have at least half decent fencing. i have seen geldings behave horridly and even a well behaved stud can have an off day. also new stud new place can cause issues. 90% of the time its not an issue. but i have seen when it is and its not purdy. nothing wrong with having a GOOD fence.
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