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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I finally found something that my horse likes, and I am happy with the ingredients/nutritional profile. It is 1100 kcal/lb. Is that a little or a lot in the grand scheme of calories? It kind of sounds like a lot to me, but I am only feeding one lb, so only 1100 "extra" kcals.

How much work would one need to do to work off 1100 kcal? Would that be like a simple walk down the water trough or like a 1/2 - 1 hour trail ride? Roughly speaking.
 

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1100 kcal/lb is good if horse needs weight. Not something I'd feed to an easy keeper.

As far as working that off. Think it would take more then just a walk to water tank. Or just 1/2 trail ride,that also depends on how hard horse gets ridden.

Just my guess on it all ,I could be totally wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1100 kcal/lb is good if horse needs weight. Not something I'd feed to an easy keeper.

As far as working that off. Think it would take more then just a walk to water tank. Or just 1/2 trail ride,that also depends on how hard horse gets ridden.

Just my guess on it all ,I could be totally wrong.
Aw. Thanks.

My horse is an easy keeper, but needs the vit. and minerals. She does not like CA Trace pellets or a powder with hay pellets. :( So, I just have to work her more, I guess.
 
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The answer lies within a ration balancer for easy keepers.

Googling "Buckeye Gro'n'Win" there is no mention of calories anywhere, only "Supplies protein, vitamins and minerals without excess calories - Low NSC to support stable glucose and insulin concentratinos"

This is what you should look for to feed an easy keeper.

The only feeds I am finding calorie counts for are senior feeds & other complete feeds - for example, Triple Crown Senior is 1500kcal/lb...what you are feeding is nearly equivalent to the senior feed I am feeding to gain weight...
 

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What kind of feed is it? Will she lick loose or block minerals? Maybe this isn't the best thing but what I've always done is given the easy keepers who do nothing a mineral block with hay (however much they need to be the right weight. It's not too hard to eyeball) and the easy keepers who're ridden a little pelleted feed or ration balancer. The more you ride, the more you feed. Unless the horse REALLY needs this specific thing, I'd jut offer minerals (never known a horse not to eat them if they really needed it) and feed some good quality hay (actual hay is generally better than pellets because it hasn't been processed). If the horse has access to pasture that's even better since some vitamins and minerals are lost in the drying process (though in high quality hay it's generally not a terrible difference). If you really feel like you need some more vitamins without the bulk, feed her a ration balancer. Purina has a good one.

If you've got good hay/grass and access to minerals and your horse's digestion is working right, you shouldn't have to do much else. Or at least, that's been my experience. Ration balancer can't hurt though.

I personally have never measured anything in kcals. I've always fed what I feel is right and then go from there. Looking a little pudgy/acting hot = feed a little less. Starting to drop weight and lower energy = feed a little more. Since any change in feed amount should be made gradually, this tends to work out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'd jut offer minerals (never known a horse not to eat them if they really needed it)
Do horses regulate minerals? Some say that they do, but other say they can only regulate salt...?
 

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I feed Purina Feeds, Strategy GX at 1500 Kcal/lb, Enrich Plus at 1500 Kcal/lb and Ultium Compete at 1900 Kcal/lb, so I'd say that yours, at 1100 comes in fairly low, good for an easy keeper.

I'd be more interested in knowing the NSC for the easy keeper. The 3 products I feed come in at Strategy GX NSC 24, Ultium Compete NSC 15 and Enrich Plus NSC 11. I have 2 air ferns who get nothing but prairie grass and 1/2 lb Enrich Plus 2X/day, and they are not lacking anything. Both look great and no laminitis issues with either one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd be more interested in knowing the NSC for the easy keeper. The 3 products I feed come in at Strategy GX NSC 24, Ultium Compete NSC 15 and Enrich Plus NSC 11. I have 2 air ferns who get nothing but prairie grass and 1/2 lb Enrich Plus 2X/day, and they are not lacking anything. Both look great and no laminitis issues with either one.
It's 10% MAX. That's partially why I am feeding it. No grain or no molasses either.
 

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From the merck veterinary manual:
"daily digestible energy requirement of the nonworking adult horse in good body condition is estimated to be on average 33.3 kcal/kg body wt, with a minimum requirement of 30.3 kcal/kg for easy keepers or draft/warmblood types of horses and 36.3 kcal/kg for hard keeper adult horses."
So for a 1,000 lb horse that put you at a minimum of 15,000 kcal per day - when doing nothing... I have seen calorie requirements estimated up to 33,000 kcal per day for horses in hard work.

So in the grand scheme of things, 1,100 kcal are only a small part of the daily energy requirement and if you are only feeding 1 lb of it, it is unlikely to cause problems. Especially if the NSC is low.
 
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