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Hi,
My QH fractured his leg 10 days ago. He is tied and on stall rest for the next couple of month. Vet said the first 2-3 weeks are critical because of breakdown of cells in fracture which will make leg weaker. We have changed his diet and are keeping him occupied by hanging hay net and keeping it full of hay along with lick it( for something diff.) and bran mash. He was on 2g of bute twice a day and are now down to 1/2 g twice a day. Daytimes are easier to occupy him since stuff is always going on at the barn. Night time we started sleeping at barn and are now checking on him every 3-4 hours. Any recommendation as to what else I could be doing?? How many success stories are out there with this. It is his radius( upper part of leg) thats fractured. Not sure how but he had a small laceration above knee. Was turned out with another horse the day it happened
 

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I'm sorry that happened. Most likely from a kick.
Am I right to assume it's a hairline fracture?

ETA:If I had waited for the picture I would have answered my own question
 

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Unfortunately I had a similar incident two horses ago and I agree with Natisha that it is most likely from a kick. Given the laceration your greatest danger right now, besides the weakness in the leg, is infection. Is he on any antibiotics?

As for keeping him occupied, hard to do. At least at 19 he isn't a frisky 5 year old that is going to go spastic at the restriction. You've changed his diet which should take out some of the excess energy so that helps.

Keep your vet's number close and call if you have any concerns or need other ideas on keeping the horse calm and quiet.

Best wishes on a full recovery.
 

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can you hang a ball or something ? i had a 25 yr old that had fx his shoulder , put him in a box stall per Vet orders, left free feed hay, pellets,etc, had to put him back into his outdoor larger pen, he almost kicked the back wall out, So age may help but not always. ;)
 

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I'm so sorry and I hope he gets a speedy recovery! I know my grandmother and great grandmother both had two horses that fractured their legs back in the '50's and '60's. My great grandma's was a hairline and he recovered completely. My grandmothers horse practically shattered his leg. He also recovered completely. If that was the success back then, then I'm sure there's hope for him, I've noticed vets have come a long way into understanding and treating fractures.

Watch for any problems and feel free to barrage you vet with questions and concerns. Keep things calm and quiet and watch for infections. I'm keeping you guys in my thoughts!
 

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Wow, poor guy!

The horse that I grew up on, Buck, broke a bone in his lower leg when he over-reached at a team roping once. I can't remember which bone it was but 3 different vets suggested he be put down as he would "never be sound again".

Dad knew this horse was a fighter and didn't feel it was right to just give up on him so easily so he decided to give him a chance to heal. He put Buck on stall rest for about 3 months with super duper deep bedding. It was deep enough that when he lay down, he was almost as tall as he was when standing. That helped to take some of the pressure off his broken leg and helped to prevent founder in the other front foot. After 3 months of stall rest, Buck was turned out in a big pasture to chaperone a herd of weanlings and yearlings (he never was the type to go blasting around, he was always more of a plodder) for about a year. At the end of that year, he came up sound as he ever was and went on to be a great horse for many more years. I think he was 7 or 8 when he broke it and he was finally retired in his early 20's...mostly because we had all outgrown him and preferred to ride horses with more zip to them. He was still plenty sound to take out the occasional novice friend or relative for a day of trail riding or working cattle though.



Normally, with a broken leg on a horse, it's not the actual break that gets them, it's the founder that usually develops in the opposite leg (remember Barbaro?). If he is at least semi-weightbearing on the broken leg, then that's a huge plus toward his chances of full recovery.
 

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My aunt used to ride 3 day eventers. Her eventer broke his leg (dont know how bad) and the vet said to shoot him (this was a long time ago). My great-grandfather had a thing about slinging horses lol. He had this BIG tree that could shelter the horse and hold it. He crafted a harness and slung the horse up to where only about 25% of his weight was on his feet. He would lower the horse slowly over the months to where he was standing on his own. No founder and the horse went back to jumping and was sound. (He also did this with the other horses when the landscapers fed them grass clippings and they all colliced -_-").

I am willing to believe that slinging a horse (to where some weight is still being supported by him) is a good way to prevent founder in an ill/injured horse, but the bedding idea will be easier in your case.
 

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My Bo's favorite(now retired) mare had a worse break than that. Her leg was braced and she may have been in a sling(cant remember). The vet nearly put her down, but her owner was determined. She went on to be a winning endurance mare.
 

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Uncle Jimmy's Hangin' Balls, they LOVE 'em and they can entertain themselves for hours. I used a "Tongue Twister" for my Likkits when my stallion was in show training and kept stalled. He loved both of those toys. He also had a small stall ball he could throw out and play catch with folks but that one might not be so good for your guy right now.
 

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My horse fractured his knee before I got him, and a lady rehabbed him. He has been very successfully shown both English and western previously, even up to the world level and earning titles. I had my vet check it during the PPE and the only thing left of it is some scar tissue that won't interfere until he's older.The only thing I have to do differently with him is be very diligent about what flooring he's stalled on at shows. If it's hard like concrete I just have to bed it extra deep.
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In a lot of ways, fractures are better than soft tissue damage because a fracture can heal completely, whereas soft tissue injuries rarely do. It sounds like he's on the right path. Are you wrapping his legs? Have you use anything like Draper Therapies or Back on Track to help promote circulation at all? I used it on my knee after surgery and it makes a huge difference imo. Good luck with your horse - glad to hear he's getting weaned off the bute and I hope he continues to progress well!
 

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Uncle Jimmy's Hangin' Balls, they LOVE 'em and they can entertain themselves for hours. I used a "Tongue Twister" for my Likkits when my stallion was in show training and kept stalled. He loved both of those toys. He also had a small stall ball he could throw out and play catch with folks but that one might not be so good for your guy right now.
I used one of these with Hunter when he was on stall rest when he tore a ligament. It was hilarious and his face was all sticky as it would roll up one side and down the other. It kept him occupied for quite a while.
 
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