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Discussion Starter #1
I've owned my 16.1hh skewbald mare Summer for about 5 year now. She has been lame for 3-4 of these years.

After x-rays and nerve blocks and whatever else you could imagine and that could burn a hole in my pocket the vets came up with nothing and said give her 6 month off. 2 year later there was no difference.

It seems to be her front right the most. She cannot turn tightly, she is short on it and when turning she seems to shuffle and drag it along.

The x-rays did show her front legs hadd bent to a funny angle and i will attach if i can.

I just need some ideas of what this could be.
 

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I'm bumping this up - I don't have an answer but I know there are a couple folks that might and hopefully will come in:)
 
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Find a hill, then try walking her up it. Does her gait change?
Turn her around and try walking her down it. Watch her shoulders very closely from both sides. Do either of them have a shuddering, jerky action and not a smooth normal action when coming down the hill?
If so, it could be cartilage degeneration up in her elbow. If so then speak to your vet about joint suppliments and things that can be done to make her more comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi! Thank you for replies.
The nerve block was done from low down as far as I can remember.
She was also given shoes with heel raisers in which seemed to help for a short period of time.

Even though you cant say anything I believe her old farrier was mucking up somewhere.

I will get the photos asap for you guys.

On a hill she seems to be alright as long as its straight. I did loads of hill work with her as recommended by the physio who was also trying to help.
 

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I will try this. We had her on vetroflex which is a expensive joint supplement and it did seem to help a little but again just no further forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is probably one of my most recent photos from the other day. Just for people to see how her front legs look and if there's anything noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Can we see photos of the horse and leg in question as well? Video? Any radiographs from the front? Also photos of his hoof taken from ground level on a hard flat surface.
As far a video goes all my videos where wiped from my laptop but you can look at this of her trotting. There maybe more videos of her on this channel but its from when i was younger aha.
 

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I'm not a vet nor a farrier, but to me from the radiograph she appears to possibly have a negative palmar angle - so this might be worth reading up on. The photo of her is very small and impossible to tell anything. Please take specific photos of her feet. Clean her feet, stand her on something flat and solid and then you need to take the photos with the camera resting in the ground from the side, front and back, and then one more of her sole while the foot is lifted. Make sure for that one that your camera is at the same angle as her sole.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Photos of hooves!

Ive took these today! Looking at them Ive been doing loads of research into negative palmar angle. She seems to have no heel! Thinking about going barefoot? Think its a good idea?
 

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She does have heels, they're just underrun. A horse will always have a heel, but it can be mismanaged like your girl's. I would go barefoot if she could remain sound. That would be the easiest way to fix her feet. She needs frequent trimmings to back that toe up and bring her heel back to where it needs to be. I would say the lameness is from heel pain. If she can soundly go barefoot, do so, and find a barefoot trimmer who can get your girl's feet taken care of. Good luck!
 
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The heels may be under-run, but why does the back of the shoe not extend back far enough to give her some support under her heels? it looks to be too short for the hoot. It's one thing to set them back from the toe to give a more "mustang roll" , but I don't think they pull them back from the heel, too.
 

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Upright pasterns and underslung heels and a horrible shoe job. The angle of her pasterns need to relatively match up with the angle of her heels. You need a farrier and a vet that can stop wasting your $$ and help your horse.
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Agree with Waresbear:) EEK:-o After seeing those feet,your farrier work is what is contributing to her lameness!
 

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I have visions of the heel bulbs try to drop down over the back of the shoes as there's no support there. That would be like us standing on a step with our heels over the edge. It would soon start to hurt.
 

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They are set under the heels. But with the heels being underrun, that's where they ended up. If the farrier had set the back of the shoes back farther, she could very easily overreach and rip that shoe off. It wouldn't be a problem if the heel were where it's supposed to be.
 
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