The Horse Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I know some about horses and I'm looking at a 16 year old paint horse. Is 500 dollars a good deal. Thanks, Answers would be appreciated. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
In my area that price would only get you a companion horse, also often a expensive money pit. I know prices are different depending on where you live but you'd want to be extremely careful about a horse at that price. Around here I've seen some adds by deluded owners asking $2000 for a companion horse or one that has a laundry list of "issues" that they don't want to deal with. I guess if the horse has the temperament and is sound enough to do what you want to do with it and it passes it's PPE then it would be a fantastically good deal. Good idea to take someone very knowledgeable about horses that can see any red flags.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,225 Posts
I would be very suspicious of a horse that only cost $500. Make sure you get a PPE (pre purchase examination) by a reputable vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,880 Posts
500$ is a very cheap asking price. This means you need to figure out why the horse is only 500$. Is the horses trained under saddle? It's harder to train an older horse. Is the horse sound? They should be forthcoming with any issues. Is the horse up-to-date for teeth, vaccinations, and deworming?

Think of it this way: someone offers you an iphone for 20$. Do you say woohooo! I got a cheap iphone? Or do you ask questions about whether it works, whether it was stolen, or whether it really is an iphone if you get my drift...

Not that you can't get a 500$ horse, but you need to know what you're buying. Last winter I bought a 650$ pony. She was underweight (from a previous home), shaggy, not quite 3 years old, and completely untrained. So that was a fair price. Now that we have her looking much healthier, up to date on all shots, teeth, etc., and lightly going under saddle, we could flip her for 2-3000$ I think.

A horse that is rideable (trained and sound enough to ride walk /trot/canter) should go for 2500-3500$ and up for the most basic, run-of-the-mill horse. So ask yourself why this horse is so cheap. It is highly likely that this "cheap" horse will end up costing you a lot more than a more expensive horse that is well trained and in good health.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,477 Posts
If the horse fits your needs and wants for riding, is healthy and sound...
Yes, its a good price.
I would invest a bit more and have a vet of your choice, that you pay go out and do a PPE, a wellness exam.
A basic exam that can tell you if the horses eyesight is good, if he has a good heart and lungs, if nothing seriously wrong is seen or detected to me is money well spent.
It is coming into winter, people do not want to be paying board on a horse with little use and...the novelty many had when so many were home to say "we own a horse" is also wearing off so yes, horses are going to be sold soon and many of them for probably far cheaper than many were purchased for.

Now with all that mentioned by me and those prior responses...
The cost of the horse is inexpensive...
It is the monthly cost of keeping the horse no matter if you board or at home that adds up.
Horses also need vet and farrier work on a set schedule of time to be healthiest..
Horses need tack...saddle, bridle, saddle pad, girth/cinch and for some they also need blankets or sheets if they live outdoors so they can have some protection from the elements and be more comfortable.
That is where the expenses become larger...and for a $500 horse there are few places you would board that would not charge that just for stall, turn-out, hay and feed fed...and figure your farrier every month will budget you to keeping those feet in good health too.

Best of luck and if "this is the one" introduce us please to your new friend.
We love pictures too so share away and lots of them.
WELCOME to the Forum!!
🐴...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
Used to be you could get a good ol trail horse for that down in the southern us (more rural areas) but they were usually teenagers with no fancy buttons. But rideable. With today's market, I'd be suspicious as to why, but someone might just be wanting the horse gone. But usually people don't take a hit like that and will ask what the animal is worth.

My old retired gelding could go somewhere to be a beginner lesson horse for 3k and he's 26 with arthritis and has his bad days. I will NOT be getting rid of him, he's gonna die with me. But just to put in perspective what the current market is like. Three years ago I couldn't have given him away and he was more sound then.
 
  • Like
Reactions: knightrider

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
So my pasture currently has a $500 2yr old (fee for adoption at rescue) and a $200 dude string trail horse that was unknown aged older horse at time of purchase (they needed to go down by one in herd and it wasn't worth driving him to auction alone). My old guy was quite dependable at following horse ahead of him, just a touch of arthritis in his hocks. Now my baby is with a little work turning into a bomb proof horse. Of next year I have to teach him all about saddles. My most expensive horse was $900 but I have horses because I enjoy them and just being able to ride on my own how I want to.

And everyone is right about it really doesn't matter how much initial costs is you keep paying to keep them fed and healthy. It's all a matter of what you want to do and what the horse is capable of....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
My usual concern (and I’ve been burned soooo many times on this because I am terrible at aging by teeth) is the actual age of the horse. Unless they are registered and have an actual date of birth, aging is just the opinion of whomever happens to be looking at their teeth. My own vet said he’s pretty accurate up to about age 7, then after that it’s a guessing game unless they are pretty old. I’ve purchased $500 horses and they have turned into incredible riding horses but I’ve also purchased $500 horses who needed that much and more in maintenance.

If you don’t have a PPE done, I’d at least ask someone you trust to try to estimate age or ask owners for some kind of proof as to age. If you’re okay with taking on an older horse (say,
early 20’s), that’s great too.

All that rambling to say just because they say he’s 16 doesn’t necessarily mean he’s 16 unless he’s registered with an actual birth date or he was born on their property.

Example: I had a horse vet aged at 15. Horse wasn’t very reliable and I gave him to someone who said he would just be a pasture pet. They lied, of course, and 10 years later I was contacted by someone who had tracked back on owners to ask me how the horse was at roping. I said “Huh? He was a rescue horse who was used for drill a couple of years and retired. That horse should be 25 years old by now!” He had been sold to them as a 5 year old roping horse, even said 5 yo on the Coggins. It happens.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,477 Posts
Ask to see his coggins as that has age and markings of the horse if not a actual picture of the animal.
The person doing the blood draw and paperwork is usually pretty accurate...
If you want to err, add 5 years to what is estimated and you should be pretty well covered then of how old is...
Age though till you get into the 30's is just a number....to me.
Many horses are still ride-able and great mounts well into their upper 20's and just a bit of slowdown in the 30's for horses who age well.
There are never guarantees as papered/registered horses can have health problems same as grade, unknown age.
🐴....
 
  • Like
Reactions: BethR

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,880 Posts
Age though till you get into the 30's is just a number....to me.
Many horses are still ride-able and great mounts well into their upper 20's and just a bit of slowdown in the 30's for horses who age well.
I agree, except that as they get older, they often get more expensive to keep. Teeth get worn so you have to provide chopped hay or hay cubes. Arthritis requires medication and/or treatments. There is just so much more likelihood that they will need extras. So while I don't think twice about buying whatever my senior needs to keep him healthy and happy, I wouldn't go out and buy another 20-something horse.

Someone tried to give me a 19 year old "project" Standardbred just the other day, and I politely declined, but in my head, was thinking "not in a million years". It's just not worth retraining a horse that age given the challenges of doing so, and the limited number of riding years you might get out of them. I don't have unlimited space and money for such a horse, sadly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
Is it possible that the low price is because the owners are basically just looking for a good home for this horse?
I paid $600 for my Angelina, a registered Morgan. At 20 years old, she was no longer up to her former owners riding demands, but she was perfect for me.
They were very happy to sell me this wonderful mare, knowing that she’d have a great home for the rest of her life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I got a $600 horse with saddle last year. I wouldn't rank him high in the sane category, slow progress but getting better. Ridable and sound. Was about 10 at the time. His previous owner was pretty upfront about it. Didn't place an ad herself and only messaged people that were looking and seemed like good homes.


He would be extremely easy to rehome for more on one of his good days, but i have a fear he'd end up on a meat truck or in a not great home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,450 Posts
An okay horse can be found for that money.

How old is it? What are the owners claiming it will do?ou're not sure, do you know someone who can go look at the horse with you?
$500 horses here are not to be found near me. $1000.00 horses are difficult to find, and if one does get advertised, the flippers or killers are there first thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey, thanks for the replys, there is a local cowboy that said he would like to ride it to see if it has any bad
tricks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I wouldn't use it very hard, just check the Cattle once or twice a day since we will be calving 6 first time calver and 28 calls on corn stalks, cause it can be snowy at calving time. Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,880 Posts
Hmmm... sounds to me like you want a working horse. What seems like it's not very hard for you might seem like hard work to a horse, but of course it depends on how far you need to go when you are looking for calves. You might also want a horse that has some experience with cows.

Just how much knowledge do you have about horses? How much riding experience do you have? Do you know how to care for them? They are really different than cows. You might consider a four-wheeler/ATV instead of a horse if you have limited knowledge of how to ride and care for horses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
We have a UTV but we do ridge till in a circle so I really can't go across them unless I go slow. I have done quite a bit of riding on friends and cousins horses so that won't be a problem. And also I helped my cousin take care of his horses, so I know most of that.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top