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There are so many horse breeds, and so many more that look similar to one another. How can you tell the difference? It's difficult, but it can be done. For now, lets just stick to the most recognizable.

  1. The Arabian Horse:






The Arabian horse, also called the "Arab," is one of the most unique and recognizable horse breed in the world. They are known for their dished face, a huge trait of this breed. Because this breed originated in the hot deserts of Arabia, they always have jet-black skin to reflect the heat, visible around the snout and eyes.




2. The Norwegian Fjord






The Norwegian Fjord, also called the Fjord horse, is a breed for Norway. They usually have cream bodies, but always have both black and white on the mane and tail.


3. The Gypsy Horse






The Gypsy horses goes by many names, such as the Gypsy vanner, Gypsy cob, Tinker horse, Irish cob ,and more! Gypsies are short breeds, but they are still big enough to be ridden by an adult. Believe it or not, but they can grow mustaches! Many other draft horse breeds can grow mustaches, but it isn't as common.


4. The Marwari






The Marwari horse is a short breed known for their ears that cave in. Don't confuse this breed for the tall Kathiawari, who also have caved ears!


5. The Akhal-Teke






The Akhal-teke has won the title "The Golden Horse." Why? Well, their fur shines! Akhal-tekes have small heads, long legs, and skinny necks. They are one of the fastest horse breeds because of this.


5. The Appaloosa






The appaloosa is a breed from the United States. This breeds always have appaloosa markings (That white part near the horses rump). An appaloosas tail doesn't usually grow very long, even when they reach full growth.
 

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I think Icelandics should be #1 on the list. They are very distinctive looking with fluffy fur, long, thick manes and tails, an athletic yet powerful physic, small, pointed, elvish ears, a short, stocky build, huge, intelligent eyes, a wide forehead, and a tapering face with strong legs.
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My welsh pony looked like an Icelandic. I reckon a quarter horse should be on the list. For me they’re the easiest horse to pick out.
 
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I would think Clydesdale would be recognized even if only from commercials.

I don’t think the majority of non horse people know Icelandics exist and a lot of horsey people couldn’t pick them out of a line up of other big ponies with winter coats.
It is true, many non horse people don't know Icelandics exist. Then again, most non horse people don't know the existence of more than a handful of breeds at most. People who have experience with the breed would agree with me that they are very distinct looking from ponies, though they are related to mongolian horses, shetlands, and connemaras. Part of what sets them apart from most ponies is their thick, long mane and tail (which makes the hair of most equines seem very short in comparision), and their athletic yet still very powerful build. Most ponies I have seen fall into a cob category, which aren't the most athletic but very strong, or are more refined and can't carry much weight. They do look like big shetlands in their winter coats, though, because they get incredibly fuzzy.
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My welsh pony looked like an Icelandic. I reckon a quarter horse should be on the list. For me they’re the easiest horse to pick out.
I often get Quarter horses and Mustangs mixed up, even stocky TBs can pass for a QH. A true, well bred QH is quite distinct, though, but they are hard to come by. Same goes for Icelandic horses.
 

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Isn't it true that all Fresians descend from 3 individuals since the breed was nearly wiped out in the war? That might explain all the genetic defects.
 

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Isn't it true that all Fresians descend from 3 individuals since the breed was nearly wiped out in the war? That might explain all the genetic defects.
I think so. I believe a 15% inbreeding coefficient is the average for them. In Icelandics, anything above 5% is discouraged. Friesians are almost clones of each other, though they are definitely beautiful.
 

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I would have to think the Friesian is one of the most recognizable breeds there is. Nothing else really looks like a Friesian!

Quarter Horses to me are sort of generic. They are sort of the "default" breed in my area. Strangely, I have never owned a purebred QH.
Friesians are definitely very easy to pick out! I also find AQH very easy to pick out, and I also can pick out a Clydesdale.
 
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Here, I think the average person would recognise Shetlands and Clydesdales as natives, even if they can't name the breeds. Highlands less so.

It helps that Shetlands are everywhere and were on telecommuications adverts. Clydesdales are more likley to be known by our older generations.

If they saw an image of a Friesan, they'd probably describe it as the 'big black horse on the bank advert'.

 
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Isn't it true that all Fresians descend from 3 individuals since the breed was nearly wiped out in the war? That might explain all the genetic defects.
Around 1913 there was only 3 approved stallions in the studbook, lack of popularity, crossbreeding and changing the direction of the breeding goals resulted in a 10 year span of no new approved stallions. Luckily, today, we can test for genetic defects and try to make the breed healthier (fingers crossed!)
Friesian Timeline - Fhana
 
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