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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If any of you were following my story from before, you'll know that I made a horrible purchase decision. I was enrolled in a Western Ranch & Cow Horse program that required me to own a green, young horse. Thinking that I could handle it, I bought a beautiful 3 year old paint mare. She seemed sweet, until I moved her to a different property. I did a ton of ground work on her and she respected me very well, until I sat on her and she bucked me off within 1 second. I had ridden her previous to buying her and she was a dream! Well, let's just say that I'm a little bit nervous now. I decided to sell her and let myself recooperate, and that was in May of 2013.

I want some input from you guys. I feel like there is a hole in my heart that can only be filled by a horse. I was thinking about buying one in September/October.. I want an old fart that has been there done that, one that hopefully won't buck me off and give me any grief. And I know that the possibility of being bucked off is always there - green or well trained horse. I'm just scared that it will hurt my back further. I really want to get myself back in the saddle! And I want that personal feeling that comes with owning your own horse. The funds aren't an issue.

I'm wondering what you guys think .. what do you suggest as the right course of action for me?
 

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Could you ease yourself into it? Do you have to own right away?

I would say if you aren't currently taking lessons (yes, I know you were an equine student of some kind but I strongly believe everyone is still learning and you sound like you could greatly benefit from a calm, confident mentor that helps you feel comfortable in the saddle again) that you should look in to doing so. Talk to an instructor, build a bit of a friendship and let a good lesson horse help you rebuild your confidence and remind you of a time when you felt better on the back of a horse.

The next logical step would be leasing of course. With or without lessons leasing is a good idea rather then jumping into an ownership commitment. Whether you lease for fun and try a few horses or find a lease to own situation it may help you to be sure you've found the horse that is the best match for you.
 

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I would definetly take lessons if you can afford to, having a bad experience is hard to get over, get lessons on a nice/safe/been there type of horse that will help build your confidence. Good luck and keep us posted on how things are going!
 

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As others have mentioned, take lessons if you can. Also, if you find what seems to be the right horse for you, ask if they will allow a trial period. Some horses aren't crazy about change and it can take a while for them to settle in. In my area, there are several horse rescues that work with you to find the right fit and offer a two week trial period. Good luck!
 

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if i owned my Eddie horse instead of just leasing him, he would be a perfect candidate for you to half lease. i call him my steady Eddie for a reason :) definitely has more whoa than go, never puts a foot wrong (since his shoes were pulled - i despise his owner's farrier), and i am comfortable putting my 9 year old kiddo on him (and she has never done anything other than pony rides).

i do hope you find the perfect horse for you, whether it be leasing, lessons, or the plunge back into owning. i totally understand that 'hole in the heart' feeling. had it for 12 years in between having my old gelding and having to let go of him for financial reasons to now, back into horses and riding with a happy heart.
 

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Leasing would be a good idea if you can find the right horse. In my experience though, I've rarely come across a good safe lease horse, most people either keep or quickly sell those. I've had a lot more luck with buying.

Good horses are out there. After some bad falls I bought a cheap horse that seemed quiet, but it wasn't quite right. I then forked out a little more money and came across my current boy. He's only six but he's so quiet. They're out there.

If it's right for you, well that's something that only you can know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We have a facility here in Edmonton, AB called the Whitemud Equestrian Centre which does rehabilitation riding lessons.. I'm looking into that, and then I think I will try the whole leasing with the option to buy thing :) So that way if me and the horse don't work out, I'm not stuck. Thanks guys!
 
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I'll echo the lesson option. Sounds like a good thing for you, especially if you have the opportunity to ride multiple school horses. You'll be able to remember that not ALL horses want to buck your butt off :wink:

Not all sellers are willing to negotiate a lease to own. Most folks that are trying to sell a horse are looking to let them go pretty quickly, but I've heard of a few. Don't look past the idea of leasing, and then looking to purchase a different horse. I think that your timeline is about right. You'll have all spring and summer to take lessons and regain your confidence before going out into the horse ownership world. Given your previous purchase history, I would consider enlisting your trainer's help in the purchase process. I don't know the full story with the mare, but if you only rode her a few times at the previous owner's place before moving her and she had a 100% turnaround then I would suspect that she was drugged. Have an extra set of eyes around to look for warning signs, and do a prepurchase exam with bloodwork.

Good luck, and try not to be worried! You have a good, solid plan in the workings. Lessons for half a year, THEN lease or purchase your "old fart" :p
 

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Given your previous purchase history, I would consider enlisting your trainer's help in the purchase process... Have an extra set of eyes around to look for warning signs, and do a prepurchase exam with bloodwork.

Good luck, and try not to be worried! You have a good, solid plan in the workings. Lessons for half a year, THEN lease or purchase your "old fart" :p
This is a good point. If you choose to do lessons first, which it sounds like you are so that's awesome, then you can talk about your concerns not only about yourself but about a future horse and they can help you find a good match. As a trainer they may have more horse connections then you and therefore more resources to find that horse that is just right for you!


Can I ask why you're looking into a place that does rehab riding lessons? Isn't that typically for riders with certain disabilities? If you feel you need this extra assistance, by all means please go for it. Otherwise I would talk to a program that is more actual riding instruction versus a therapy of sorts as it would prep you for ownership again.
 

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Leasing would be a good idea if you can find the right horse. In my experience though, I've rarely come across a good safe lease horse, most people either keep or quickly sell those. I've had a lot more luck with buying.

Good horses are out there. After some bad falls I bought a cheap horse that seemed quiet, but it wasn't quite right. I then forked out a little more money and came across my current boy. He's only six but he's so quiet. They're out there.

If it's right for you, well that's something that only you can know.
Not necessarily- I know of quite a few people with older, very broke horses that get leased out. They need something younger or more talented, don't want to sell their older fellow, but don't want to have to keep up with all of the costs. I have a friend doing it with her pony- she wanted to make sure that the pony will remain under her ownership for life, but doesn't want to keep up with the bills for three horses. At 19 the mare is out rocking it in little kids' jumpers shows. Even as she starts to slow down the pony will still probably be perfect for beginner lessons, but when she can no longer do that my friend knows that she can always bring her home.

Now, you do need to look pretty hard to find a good lease. At that point I'd consider buying anyway.
 
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