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Well, I have an orphan that we raised. He thought he was a human for a little while, but as soon as he could be weaned we put him with some sweet mares to let him learn he is a horse. Poor little guy still doesn't know how to play, but we put him with the others as soon as we could. (since he has been with adults there were also other foals his age that did try to play with him)

Although the behavior is entertaining for us, in a way its very sad that the foal doesn't know its a horse. It will never be a completely "normal" horse when dealing with other horses, goats, or people.
 

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Yes very cute in the stall and playing with the goats, but I'm glad thats not my foal! It plowed that woman right over in the field :shock: That last part just made me cringe with the foal running through the partially open door. I'm willing to bet they've never dealt with a stifled horse, or they'd be a bit more careful!
 

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I laughed so hard when the goat stole her script.

I think that it might actually be too late in Tilly's development to change her, it appears that she fully believes she is a goat. Its highly unlikely she'll ever be a "normal" horse.
 

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Sorry for dredging up a really old thread, but I thought I would add an update. I searched out the blog from the Fell-Vallee Equestrian Center and found this on a 3/11/2013 post:

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Like I mentioned last week, Nick has been working with Tilly. After lunch, it was decided today was the day.
You can only begin to comprehend the magnitude of this decision to get on Tilly. Last year, not knowing what in the world to do with this horse, I decided maybe we should teach her to drive. I have a friend who is a very good Standardbred trainer. He came over and was going to help me teach Tilly to pull one of the race carts hanging around the farm. She was happy enough to wear the bridle and harness, but when we tried to get her to move, all hell broke loose. She reared repeatedly, refused to move forward, never tried to kick, but leapt and carried on like a mad woman. When that didn't seem to get her anywhere, she laid down on the ground and refused to get up. It was absurd. I was fearing a repeat of this and warned Nick she may try to lay down on him and just to be quick to jump off.

She was wild on the longe line today. She's been fairly reliable, but the weather was warm and the wind was blowing. He worked her on the longe until she was finally quiet...but of course she was hot and sweaty and puffing like a freight train in order to get her there. Oh well, sometimes tired is best. Like Pekita, I held the reins, but we brought the mounting block to her rather than her to the block. I fed her peppermints while Nick acclimated her to the weight (she's in a western saddle, remember) and then he quietly mounted up. She stood fine as long as I kept stuffing candy in her mouth. We walked away a few strides. She was pretty wobbly, but Nick is pretty big for her...best not to buck him off with...and we walked and stopped a few times. Suddenly, a big gust of wind came up and rattled the roof. Tilly found her sea legs in a hurry and bounced through the air and ran backwards with me attached, but quickly settled again. It wasn't that big of a deal. We walked around for a few moments until she started to flash a ****y face. We thought it best to end on a good note and actually got further than I was expecting...my assumption being she would lay down, pinning Nick's leg under her and having to heave her off so he could get up only to have her remain flat on her side with her eyes closed pretending we didn't exist. Nope, she paid attention and was happy to try. It was very successful!
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And on a 3/04/2013 post:

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A while later, Nick came by to work with Tilly. Most of you are not aware of who Tilly is. She is a coming 4 year old Regazzoni mare out of a very nasty TB. She was orphaned at a very young age and was raised by 2 goats we had on the farm at the time. Watch Tilly's news story Tilly has lots and lots of energy and is an extremely alpha mare. She has a temper, is highly intelligent and quick with her feet and teeth. Just what everyone wants a in horse, yes? NOT! However, Nick has decided he wants to tame the savage beast and I'm not going to stop him...especially since his mother knows and didn't call me to tell me NO! Of course, I decided to get involved when Tilly started to misbehave a little on the cross ties. Some horses can suck energy right out of you just by standing next to them...Tillly is one of them (btw...Tilly and Wheels have the same sire! Energy suckers!). We dodged feet for a few minutes and then got her settled again. We wanted to longe her, so I put a bridle on her. Even though I had zero energy, my survival instincts kick in really well and we danced around for several minutes before the bridle was on. The whole time, Nick kept saying, "let's just do it another day, you shouldn't be doing this, you're making me feel bad..." Shut up, Nick!! Once you start something, follow it through. He understood this concept at the end. Once the bridle was on, she was fine and Nick took over completely. I went back to cleaning stalls. My mom was working on them at this point, too, so we were catching up.
...

The blog was only started last year, so this is all that is available. Thought you guys might want to know. It seems that the cute little filly has turned into an untamed monster.
 

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where is this blog? can you post the http.
 

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This filly had horrid ground manners then and sounds like she hasn't gotten any better. They blame it on her "high energy" but they should only be blaming themselves. If Henny EVER tried to run me over or barge past me into his stall, I'd be making him think he was going to die. Sadly, her nature is VERY common with orphan foals. They're babied and not treated like a horse. They're not disciplined and think they are boss over humans. I hope they get her in line before she seriously injures someone.
 

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there is always the possibility... being very sick and abanonded by its dam at two days old... the horse was born with developmental problems and may never be 'right'.
it should be treated with extreme patience and this would be an ideal project for natural horsemanship such as Parelli or Quantum Savvy.

Claire
 

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This was on the blog on 4/08/13:
Nick and I had our hands full with the vets, so we didn't get chores done until well after noon. Then Mo decided he didn't feel well, so I gave him some Banamine and handwalked him for a while. Nick got Tilly ready to ride and by the time that was set, Mo seemed to be feeling better. Poor old man had a tummy ache. Liz and Ali showed up while Tilly was working. They were full of smiles and looked so tan and beautiful. I'm so jealous! They watched us work Tilly and laughed at the fact the lion is pretty much tamed.
So, hopefully Tilly's issues have been resolved.
 

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That is an adorable video. We did just that a few years ago when the dam passed away shortly after birth. We brought a goat in to live with her to keep her company. We didnt have the problems of her being afraid of other horses in the end like the filly in the video, but the goat and the foal were great friends.
 
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