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Hee. I actually have the same problem sort of with Dragon. He's a jumper but only jumps out if I take both of the other horses with me and he's left alone.

I have electrified ropes and he'll play with them like he thinks they are a guitar string. I've gone to turn on the juice, waiting for him to not be touching it, and as soon as I turn it on he leaves. He somehow seems to be able to sense that it's on. He is such a pest and I really like him for that.
 

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Ah I get ya. Now equine reccurent uveitis- this is different than CSNB correct? As it's found in quarter horses as well as Appaloosas? I doubt he has a vision problem but I want to keep my mind open.[/QUOTE]

Yes, uveitis is also called moon blindness, and is progressive, getting worse with every attack. Because many Appaloosas have lack of pigmentation around eyes, they have a relatively high incident of Uveitis,although nay breed can get it

CSNB, on the other hand is directly genetic, there at birth, and 'stationary;so does not get worse with time. Horses affected with CSNB simply lack some rods, I believe, but need to look that fact up, so taht they can't see in dim light, but they see normally in day light
 

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Hee. I actually have the same problem sort of with Dragon. He's a jumper but only jumps out if I take both of the other horses with me and he's left alone.

I have electrified ropes and he'll play with them like he thinks they are a guitar string. I've gone to turn on the juice, waiting for him to not be touching it, and as soon as I turn it on he leaves. He somehow seems to be able to sense that it's on. He is such a pest and I really like him for that.
Yes, horses do learn when a fence is on, and having it not on at times, will have horses testing it, not respecting it as much, and then also running through it, even when it is on, as the 'guessed wrong'
If you use electric fencing you really diminish it's effectiveness by not having it on all the time, so that it gives 'the same answer' each time
 

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Dragon is the only horse that seems to know when it's on. There is one other young colt who used to test it for a while and would get shocked every time. He's is no longer around the fence.

It has been turned off for 2 years and has kept the other two horses and do in during that time. Works fine turned off. Dragon doesn't even try to get out. He just likes to pull on the ropes with his mouth and watch them go sproinnng like a guitar string. They have all three been panicked by what ever in the yard/pen and wanted out but none tried running through the fence.

It is claimed that every ranch should have at least on electric fence somewhere that the cattle are exposed to because it causes them to respect all fences more.

Electric fence absolutely does not need to be on all the time to be effective. Dragon is a very unusual horse.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
SO.

ALL horses are inside indefinitely until we figure out exactly WHAT is going on. Left Trouble in last night and today, and got a call on my way home from work that the rest of the herd was out and about a mile down the road. Went down, called them back, re checked the fence, again, NOTHING. No breaks, no sags, no cold spots, no nothing. SOMETHING is going on. I don't know if it's some little punk opening the gate when no ones home/sleeping or what, but if that is what's going on there will be hell to pay. We're adding a top line to the fence and a lower one as well. We're also reenforcing the gates to be lockable, and I'm setting up a trail camera hidden at the main gate.

This has to stop. Trouble is obviously NOT the reason they got out, which is what I first thought. He will be going out supervised today, since I don't like to leave him in his stall for long periods of time, but the others will have to deal with it until we figure out what in the world is going on.
 

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Sorry if I'm misunderstanding, but you said there's one, chest high strand of wire? Can't they just go under that? Maybe I'm not getting the setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Sorry if I'm misunderstanding, but you said there's one, chest high strand of wire? Can't they just go under that? Maybe I'm not getting the setup.
It's at a height that discourages them from going under AND over, if you can understand that. After years of having single strand fencing, we've pretty much perfected the height needed. Our horses also aren't keen on going over the wire. If they hear it snap they stay at least ten yard away from it.
 

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I think she also mentioned the top wire was nose height. I would go wither height at least (mine are all 5 feet tall and my horses are only 14.2/14.3). And at least three wires, all hot.

Whatta did just say that they added a wire above and below it though, which should help. I sure hope it's not someone turning them loose.

Harley used to get out of his paddock last summer, when he was boarded at the neighbors. But their fences were not tall enough for him. He's a jumper! Maybe Trouble should be a jumper, LOL. I have NEVER had them escape since I brought them back home. Well, except the time that I left the gate open. Duh.

Let us know what you find out with those trail cams!
 

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It's at a height that discourages them from going under AND over, if you can understand that. After years of having single strand fencing, we've pretty much perfected the height needed. Our horses also aren't keen on going over the wire. If they hear it snap they stay at least ten yard away from it.
Sorry, but the escaping horses are contradicting that! Unless of course someone is letting them out... Harley is perfectly capable (and smart enough) to roll under a single strand like that. We were warned, which is why I have 3 strands. Clever horses can figure that out. It would be highly unlikely for them all to imitate Trouble to get out, however!
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Sorry, but the escaping horses are contradicting that! Unless of course someone is letting them out... Harley is perfectly capable (and smart enough) to roll under a single strand like that. We were warned, which is why I have 3 strands. Clever horses can figure that out. It would be highly unlikely for them all to imitate Trouble to get out, however!
I completely understand that not all horses are capable of being contained by a single strand. But what gets me is all four of these horses were on the same property, within the same fenceline, inside the same strand of single wire for fifteen plus years. One mare has been here for nearly twenty years in the same pasture, same wire, same perimeter. The only issues we've had were with animals chasing them through the wire. Even when the wire was down, they stay in. Trouble however, is new. He doesn't know our "fence etiquette" and IS a fence jumper- which the others are absolutely not. It's so incredibly unlikely that he just "taught" all the others to jump the fence in a night (including gimpy retiree and little pony) that I can't possibly see that happening.
 

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I was using a single strand at one time. Hondo hit it with his shoulder and said, on no it's hot, arched his shoulder and back down and moved right on under it. Trouble could have done that with the others watching. Horses learn like that sometimes.

I'm betting a second wire half way to the ground will stop that as all four are not likely jumping it. As you say, someone would likely have caught a foot.

But yeah, if you can throw a bicycle cable and a pad lock on the gates first, that'd be the easiest thing to eliminate. Next step would be the fence.

It would seem that many horses would leave hoof prints but if the grass is tall, maybe not.

Aren't horses fun?
 

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Discussion Starter #72
I was using a single strand at one time. Hondo hit it with his shoulder and said, on no it's hot, arched his shoulder and back down and moved right on under it. Trouble could have done that with the others watching. Horses learn like that sometimes.

I'm betting a second wire half way to the ground will stop that as all four are not likely jumping it. As you say, someone would likely have caught a foot.

But yeah, if you can throw a bicycle cable and a pad lock on the gates first, that'd be the easiest thing to eliminate. Next step would be the fence.

It would seem that many horses would leave hoof prints but if the grass is tall, maybe not.

Aren't horses fun?
There are tracks all over the outside perimeter of the pasture, but I cannot tell where they got out. There's also tracks all over the driveway, which makes me wonder if they were trying to find a way back IN. Whenever one touches the fence, they have a very strong reaction. Even the ones who didn't touch it will run. Our fence charger is extremely strong, as we used it to charge a bull pen, fencing for cattle and seventy five acres as well.
 

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I completely understand that not all horses are capable of being contained by a single strand. But what gets me is all four of these horses were on the same property, within the same fenceline, inside the same strand of single wire for fifteen plus years. One mare has been here for nearly twenty years in the same pasture, same wire, same perimeter. The only issues we've had were with animals chasing them through the wire. Even when the wire was down, they stay in. Trouble however, is new. He doesn't know our "fence etiquette" and IS a fence jumper- which the others are absolutely not. It's so incredibly unlikely that he just "taught" all the others to jump the fence in a night (including gimpy retiree and little pony) that I can't possibly see that happening.
I have to agree with you there. Something's not right.
 

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Got a good sleeping bag?
I would definitely try to see how they are getting out at night.
Yes, many times a single strand keeps horses in. My temporary fencing, that I use inside my permanent fence lines, to manage amount of pasture, is a single strand of white electric tape
However, my perimeter fence lines have two strands of smooth wire, and three in the pasture where I used to have foals. Top wire is hot
Horses do learn to run under a single strand, even a hot one-doing a 'duck and scoot'
I don't know of anyone here that uses a single strand of wire for their perimeter fences-well, perhaps the guy , whose land is across from us, but whose buildings are assessed on the next road east, as we have had his horses, his lamas and his dam donkeys here.
Yes, can happen to anyone once or so, but when you get known in the neighborhood, as someone whose animals constantly get out-not good!
My horses are getting de - spooked to donkeys, but not happy that it happens when I am not home,and thus can get put through a fence
Four times and out, for that dam jack donkey!
When I was still working in the lab, I would come home to find the one neighbour;s horses in our yard, including in heat mares.It was only because our stallion was in a field with two strands of wire, atop rail and then a hot wire above the rails, that a disaster was prevented. Since they only had an acreage, they would pasture the horses on their lawn, and just close off the laneway with a .rope.
Yea, that worked well!
Not saying that is it in your case, but I also would not be happy if a neighbor was running livestock, using just a single strand of wire, as his main fenceline. Don't care what he does, dividing up his own pastures, as it does not affect me!
I would be surprised if someone was letting your horses out, but anything is possible, including those hroses learning to duck under that single wire, and chance getting a quick zap
 

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It's at a height that discourages them from going under AND over, if you can understand that. After years of having single strand fencing, we've pretty much perfected the height needed. Our horses also aren't keen on going over the wire. If they hear it snap they stay at least ten yard away from it.
Yeah sorry that's just not going to work. I think you've gotten lucky on having easy horses that want to stay in. Trouble clearly showed them how to get out and now they're taking the opportunity. Once they know they know. And I highly doubt they are jumping (at least all of them jumping) with one strand if would be far easier to go under. One strand won't stop ANY horse that wants to leave, you've been lucky that they haven't wanted to leave before now.

Put up at least one more strand. There could be something else going on but having a solid fence is the starting point.

We have 2 strands of electric tape and I would never keep any horse that wanted to get out in, it also needs to be on. That's the bare minimum. I thought the fence looked pretty flimsy but guessed it was temporary not permanent!
 

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Have you figured out what was happening @whattatroublemaker? Have the horses gotten out again?

I have to agree with @Yogiwick . I can't imagine one strand working for Trouble. Not the best idea to keep in any animal, really, especially on uneven ground. I'm assuming you don't want to add a strand because it's 75 acres. Does it have to be 75 acres though? Can't you fence off just part of that?
 

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T-post insulators at 25 feet and galvanized wire for 1.5 miles is under $250 at Tractor Supply. I may be splitting up my pasture but I'll have to buy some posts also.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
We may have found some reason/answers to our fencing problem. We have been working endlessly for the past few days on our fencing. We've discovered some pretty interesting things. There is one corner of the fence that we usually pass over because it is so intensely wooded. It is a swamp, knee deep swamy-ness (mud, water, peat moss) so thickly wooded with alders nearly nothing can pass through. When we had cattle the cattle usually kept it quite eaten down, bt after selling the cows and opening the pasture up for the horses, it has grew back twice as thick as its ever been. Its a place that the horses don't wander into. No food, shotty footing, thick dense cover not well suited for prey animals. Well.

We picked up some bear sign in the far corner of the pasture. After investigating we discovered that horse tracks went through there on the tear, and bear sign cut them off from the house. What we've put together is they were out grazing when a bear came up from the far side of the pasture, he got between them and the way home, and they bolted in the opposite direction-away from home and toward the neighbors quite some distance away. They cut through the swamp and went through the fence, went quite a ways, made a U turn back to the fence and could not find where they could get back in. They went around almost the entire fenceline, up the driveway, around again and ended up about a mile down the road. When we didn't catch the break the first time they had learned there was quite a bit of grass down the road, and used the same trail through the fence but headed straight down the road this time to the grass.
So for the last two days we have been cutting alders out of the swamp, pounding fenceposts and reinforcing the fence along that stretch. They are out tonight and we will see where they are in the morning! Glad we got this issue sorted out!
 

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Discussion Starter #80
The escape artists have been thwarted. They're officially keeping to the pasture.

Trouble is doing better, I've decided to buy a driving harness and start driving him/hauling small logs etc. He's still a bit jumpy, a little nervous and a bit head shy, but we're getting better every day. He had a fit over an extension cord so he got to spend an hour tied with it draped all over him. No tantrums! Not allowed :lol: it's finally starting to dry up and I've got his thrush cleared up, next step is to have the farrier out to clean his feet up.

He's on 24/7 turn out now, finally, and I've cut grain off completely to see if there's any change in his behaviour. We'll be starting under saddle soon again as well, hopefully today. We're working toward a 25km ride with a friend, which will be great for him as we've only ridden with another horse a few times, and never a strange horse.
 
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