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Discussion Starter · #361 ·
@Knave, wow. That was quite an accident too.
They call them "easy entry" carts. We always joke, "Easy entry? Who cares? We need easy exit!!"
Even in a calm situation, if you're not paying attention it is super easy to trip yourself getting out. At least once during a parade I've caught the toe of my foot and ended up sprawling on the ground in front of the crowd.
 

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Discussion Starter · #363 ·
I took Aria's collar off the last time I was out. Today I walked right up with a halter and rope and caught her. She is coming along so well. It's still too scary to let me hold her hind hooves for more than a moment, but she lets me hold her front hooves for long periods of time now. She's tying well, and I did some more ponying today off Hero. It sure is much easier ponying a tiny horse off a larger one. I've often ponied larger horses off smaller ones.
Aria followed Hero very well. I took a blanket out and showed it to her, but that was very scary so I put it away after she sniffed it and worked on rubbing a saddle pad on her instead.

I always laugh at the posts that start out "Help!" But I'm going to say "Help, I need some opinions!"

Mikey's rider stopped to chat, and she said what the barn owner has also said recently. "She's not bred is she?"
😲😲😲😲

I think she is just catching up after being thin, and redistributing the weight around her body now that she has good nutrition. Right? I can feel her ribs still, so she's not apparently fat, but...here are photos from today.

Hero


Amore (animals are so amazing at staying beautiful into old age)


Aria

Please tell me that is a natural refeeding belly. Right? I have no idea what I would do if it turned out she was bred. Freak out, worry, be overjoyed. And more.
I looked at her udder, and it just looks small and normal to me. She wouldn't be able to hide a foal figure and then just pop out the belly because she was fed properly would she?







 

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Oh dang. I was scrolling down "nah nah WHAT"

To be fair there are quite a few mares at my field, most definitely not bred, that look like that. But my goodness... I would hate for my mare to be bred (coz risk) but at the same time overjoyed. Much wow, big confusion. Good luck :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #369 ·
I guess I should have paid more attention to all the posts about pregnant mares. I don't know very much about it except the gestation is around 11 months. I was just reading online that the udders don't necessarily develop until the last month or so, and that small ponies might start showing around 6 months. It would be helpful for me if she had another 5 months to go, so I could be more prepared. I'm not sure though...if she was only halfway along, how much bigger could she get?

Pretty big I guess.


A good thing is that the horses' field has field fencing already, so a foal would be secure. I'm not sure about if the weather would be bad for a new foal around here. It doesn't get cold, but it rains a lot so a foal born in the late fall/early winter might get wet. There are more sheltered corrals with stalls available. I wonder if she is Arab/Welsh, would she have been bred to an Arab or a Welsh? Lots of questions. She was apparently living in a breeder's herd, which makes things suspicious. I have to get an appointment with a vet. She'll have to trailer over since they don't do vet calls here. That makes me nervous, I'll have to ask how a foaling problem would be taken care of.

I forgot to mention a funny incident with Hero yesterday. There is a rubber mat in his shelter that keeps getting sand pushed under it, which raises the lip. I fixed it a while back, but yesterday it was sticking up again. When I went to put Hero's halter on, he took a step forward, caught his front hoof on the lip, caught his other front hoof too, and then massively tripped toward me. We both had our eyes wide with impending doom, but he threw himself up and caught his balance, except he landed one hoof right on the tip of my boot, on the end of my toes. Ouch. Then I had to push on him in vain while he recovered for a moment, until he was able to step off. Nothing injured, and he was as scared as I was. I fixed the mat right away.
 

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Her belly does look a bit interesting… most mares would have been bred for a spring baby, and I can’t remember when you picked her up, but I don’t think at 4 months she’d have a belly like that… you haven’t talked about her coming in to heat at all though. That might be a big red flag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #371 ·
It turns out the vet is willing to come to the stables, probably since I have three horses that need dentals done. Cha-ching. They come from the city down to our area once a month. This month's calendar was full so she'll come in about six weeks. Probably by then Aria will be getting even a bigger belly if she is pregnant. There is a vet that I could trailer to in five minutes, but my opinion is he's probably good for stitching up injuries or a mild colic. He doesn't do horse dentals, and has a practice that is mainly small animals. The vet coming out is from the equine hospital and they have five or six horse vets.

I've been worried about getting vet care since the town where the horses are is very small and remote. Thankfully, my last vet has been mailing me Hero and Amore's pills, but I've known we need a vet much closer. It's been a year this month since Amore and Hero had their teeth done, so things are working out OK. No one had spring vaccinations this year, and I'd like to know their recommendations for deworming in this area. I've seen Aria have a wad of food twice, and she eats pellets slowly so I'm suspicious she might have dental issues. At six, many horses are fine, but I've also heard of young horses that have issues.
 

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I worry about dental issues. Got mine checked last summer because the dentist needed work during COVID and came out. All the dentists here require you to trailer them over and that isn't going to happen any time soon. No signs of trouble right now, happily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #373 ·
It's also scary to hear horror stories on the forum about horse dentals gone wrong.

I don't know how everyone gets such good pictures from the saddle. Here were my best attempts from today.




Oh well...
We had a great ride. It was very windy but Hero only spooked once. When we first started out, Aria was calling out to Hero and running up and down the field, so he didn't want to walk away from her. I hopped off and led him a block or so down the road, then got back on and after that he was fine.

DH said Aria stopped calling after several minutes, once Hero was out of sight. Then she and Amore hung out together. To me that type of separation anxiety is fairly easy to deal with. As long as everyone calms down soon and no one gets crazy, it's not that bad.

Mikey's rider commented on how much better Hero is doing at going into the scary trails through the woods.

We only walked and trotted a little, because Mikey's rider brings her little Boston along in a sling. She feels left out because she has neurological issues and can't walk well anymore. The other Boston, Gil runs along with us.

Hero likes this pace of ride. He's a heavy horse built more for bursts of energy and slower sustained speed. He's not an endurance type physically. When you see him with the QH, Mikey, they look a lot alike. I really think as he matures more he's going to do well enough that even an intermediate rider will be able to handle him, especially if I was on another horse that could give him confidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #374 ·
The mustang colt is back at the barn, he's been at the trainer's for a couple of months. His owner says he's a yearling now. He's been gelded, is still tiny but looking a little less gawky, and is more used to being handled. Seems like he'll do fine. When we went walking by on the way down to the horse fields, I had all three horses with me. Hero absolutely insisted on going over to see the little guy. Taz bit Hero on the nose, and Hero didn't do anything. I think he likes the little critter.

I wormed everyone today. A lot of the time, I just act like Aria should know how to do something, and this strategy often works. Overthinking can sometimes be an enemy. She took the wormer like an old pro. Of course, I'm sticking something good in her mouth very often so I guess if it doesn't taste so great once in a while that's not so terrible.

Now that I have her front hooves trimmed nicely, I'm dying to work on her hind ones, but we're not quite to the point of rasping yet. I can pick out her right one, but she is still resistant to having me hold the left one. I'm going to measure her fronts soon so I can get her cute little hoof boots and we can go on walks down the road. I hope they make Renegades small enough for her, otherwise I know Easycare makes pony boots. Aria's hoof walls are nearly triple the thickness of Hero's. I'm happy for this, but it just shows how bad TB hooves are.

Aria is extremely easy to catch now. I can just walk up and put a lead rope around her neck, and then put the halter on. Leading with the others down the road is helpful for her training too, because one of the other horses inevitably crosses behind her and gets a rope across her back or around her hind end. Today Amore's rope was over the top of her neck, and she let me just swing it back and get it loose without a fuss.

Last time I was at the barn I did more playing than work, so today I had nearly four wheelbarrows of manure to haul off the acre. I always tell myself it's good for me.

DH is always willing to go get hay bales from the feed store across the road while I ride or do chores. The other day he brought back several bales because I was nearly out. It always cracks me up, because they'll tell him things and he'll have no idea what it means.
Last time he said, "They wanted you to know they also have another type that is good, and it has three kinds of hay in the bale."
"OK, do you remember what they were called?"
"No."
"Well, the orchard grass is fine."
This time he said, "They were out of the hay we usually buy, but they say this stuff is almost as good. The only problem is it has something in it."
"Like weeds or something?"
"No, it had a name, but I can't remember." I've found a couple of nettles in the hay, so probably that is what the issue was. I just tell him to get whatever grass hay is the most expensive, because that almost always ends up being the nice orchard grass.

The horses are quite happy to see my truck pull up. They first get their itchy spots scratched, then they go down to the big field to eat grass for a couple hours. When they come back, there are new piles of hay in the sheds, and there is no manure to eat around in the field, and no flies. Lots of treats all around too. Spoiled brats.
 

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I just tell him to get whatever grass hay is the most expensive
Yeah, isn't that the truth! Here the choice is almost always Bermuda vs Alfalfa, first cut or second. I prefer the Bermuda because the grass stems can lie on the bare ground and they can pick them up without getting sand. Once in a great while I can buy Timothy, but that is maybe once/year. But a simple rule of thumb is "Get the most expensive...."
 

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I don't know how everyone gets such good pictures from the saddle.
Don't feel alone. I can never get good pictures from the saddle . . . and all 4 of my horses stand quietly. Just when I am trying to snap a picture, the horse shakes his head or stomps at a fly or hitches a hind foot. Never fails. @4horses takes great pictures. I beg her to send them to me.

Very thrilling about the possibility of a foal. Isabeau was an "oops" baby. Her dam was 18 months when bred, and she delivered at 2 1/2 years old. I think you are doing an amazing job with Aria and Hero looks fabulous. I wish we humans could look so good as we age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #377 ·
Thanks, @knightrider!

DH and I are heading toward our 20th anniversary next month. I think there are many things that help people stay together for a long time, but some of the little things are quite important. Just being able to enjoy the mundane things of life is one. Another, I've seen from my own parents is the ability to tease and laugh at each other and oneself.

At the barn, we were actually having a good time picking up the manure in the field. We noticed how often there were two piles next to each other, so we could each pick up one before moving the wheelbarrow. So we said the horses planned it out that way for us. Then we joked about the skill levels required for various manure piles. For example, I said that a pile buried in deep grass was for advanced scoopers only. There were a lot of ways to make it fun, like racing to see who could get their pile into the wheelbarrow fastest. We laughed a lot.

It sounds trivial, but I've noticed that many people have difficulty enjoying life even when they're doing something very special, like visiting a spectacular place like the Grand Canyon, and even more trouble when they are in the daily grind. Many people say it's important to try to enjoy each day, even the little and mundane things in life, and I think there are enough hard and terrible times in life that can get us down, so why not try to enjoy those days when things are less stressful or depressing? I see examples of trying to enjoy the little things in life with @Knave and @SueC, who both mention spending time goofing around with their spouses, just having fun. I think that's great.

We think this quote from Twin Peaks is a good ideal to strive for:

It seems to me that those little things in life are quite important. A lot of the pressure we put on ourselves is quite ridiculous and unnecessary.
 

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That's such a wonderful post I had to log in to tell you even though I'm on the reading device without a proper keyboard. Congratulations on your upcoming 20th! 🎶🍰☕🚴‍♀️🚴🎻🎈

And that's all so true. Humour is ultra important and you'll never want for a laugh with a sense of the ridiculous as so many things are ridiculous, especially in human life and including in ourselves. It's also much easier to change if you can laugh at yourself and we all have little or big things that could be improved.

Laugh at the devil and he will flee from thee etc. And all those wonderful endorphins...😜

Children know how to play and it's great if you can never lose that capacity. While we try not to be childish we strive to be childlike - that's about not losing the best aspects of childhood like a sense of fun and play, creativity, wonder, being in the moment. Without that, as you say, people can stand in front of the Grand Canyon and be empty inside. And who else doesn't lose these qualities? ...animals
 

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That was an excellent post I agree! Husband and I were just talking about things like this. We’ve tended in the last couple years to put a lot of pressure on ourselves, and we are at a point of changing that. We just want to focus on the joy and the love. :)

You are three years ahead of us. We just had our anniversary.

I think she does look pregnant.
 
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