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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Owning undeveloped land has been a dream of mine since high school. The time has come to invest, but I am having trouble sorting out where.

The reason I am posting on this forum is because now that I have a horse, I'd love to trailer her to whatever property I purchase. I do not anticipate living on the land full time (not even after retirement), but I will camp for two weeks to two months at a time in summer. I also want the option to have a hobby farm should I change my mind.

The areas in which I am looking are quite different. The Nevada land is near Ely and Great Basin National Park. There is some juniper and pinion trees, but mostly the ground is covered with native grasses and sage brush. The Wyoming land is between Kemmerer and Yellowstone Park. There is forest, sage brush and native grasses. Ideally I want some forest, which makes me lean toward WY, however, I'd also like somewhere to which I can escape in the dead of winter, which is why NV is appealing.

I would love to hear from folks who live and ride in these areas. Please share your perspective on living and riding in each of these areas.

Thanks!
 

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@COWCHICK77, thank you for your input. I'm in SLC, UT so I'm used to cold winters. What I'd actually like to escape is the inversion (pollution). There's no guarantee I'd go in the winter, just want the option.

I'm thinking about [re]adding Arizona to the list. The property I'm considering there is my absolute favorite. It's also the best per-acre deal of the three I'm considering. I only ruled it out because it's a day's drive. So, I wouldn't use it as a weekend getaway, more like someplace to spend a week or more during school breaks. In truth, I wouldn't likely visit a NV or WY any more frequently since there are always weekend activities like my son's soccer games, horse shows, etc.
 

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@COWCHICK77, I looked in Caliente but didn't see anything I liked. As much as I like Nevada (I lived in Vegas for a while), I'm a forest-meadow lover. I could get by with the desert trees, but I'd much rather have real timber.

@Dreamcatcher Arabians, Further east. The closest town is St. John's at about 17 miles sw of the parcels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Beautiful. Just be careful of the water situation in any of those states and look at the acreage/horse requirements too.
Thanks. I have seen the NV land, and can't get to the WY property until the road dries up a bit (strike 2). I am in the process of making arrangements to see the land in AZ.

For some reason, ever since I started looking at property in the west, my mind keeps going to the movie, Mad Max: Thunderdome. LOL
 

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@trailhorserider, thank you for giving me the inside scoop. Utah has been incredibly dry too. In fact, there are already talks of a drought. We have had some forest/brush fires since I've lived here, but nothing like what you describe. I have considered the possibility of fires, but your description turns the theoretical into scary. I have heard there are lots of places to ride. All of the parcels I am considering border hundreds of acres of state land trust. One borders BLM as well. I have read a permit is required to ride on BLM land; not sure about state land.

The parcels northeast of St. Johns (at the AZ/NM border) have pines and meadows, while the parcels southeast of the town have dwarf-looking trees (pinion?) and juniper, and "native grasses" (probably scrub brush). The elevations are respectively ~ 6200 and 6400 ft above sea level. Honestly, in the case of a forest fire, would it matter the type of tree/brush? That's not a rhetorical question. As for water, there are two aquifers -- Coconino Sandstone and Bidahochi -- yet I am aware there are many people tapping into both. One of the things I love about taking the Hoover Dam tour is getting the full picture concerning our water resources (four states are tapping into the Colorado). The dam has been well below normal range for nearly a decade.

Coincidentally, I made my flight reservation today. The realtor recommended staying in Show Low Friday night. I'll be there for a hot second, but I'm glad I get to see it as I pass through.

If any of you think of questions related specifically to forest or Arizona territory, please let me know.
 
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