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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The title pretty much says it all, but before you reply make sure that you know I don't mean right off the bat, i mean like after someone has been leasing for several months to a year or longer, what aspects make owning the more beneficial of the two options. Don't post here if you are gonna tell us about the opposite, start your own thread for that and people can compare the two to see which one is best for them and their situation. Thanks!
 

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Like most horse owners, I'm a control freak. I couldnt handle leasing more so because I want to be the one who makes the final decision on things. I couldnt deal with always having to ask the owner to change something or do something with the horse.
 

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We leased our mare for 9 months before purchasing her. Probably the biggest benefit has been control. We are the only ones who ride her (our barn has exclusive leases BUT has a clause that if the BO needs the horse for a camp, that she can use your lease horse if you are not using her.)

I was more confident in purchasing tack. Our tack fits both horse and rider.

But, I have to agree, the bottom line is control. :)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, those are all reasons why I don't like leasing and want to own! I lease a lesson horse, and I don't really feel like I have control over what happens to him! Joey's like a 20ish year old pony, and they have him in camp 5 days a week then 3 lessons on top of that! WTH! If he were mine, I'd only work him like 4 or 5x a week. I also don't like how their farrier trims, but I don't have the authority to change farriers! It kinda drives me crazy... Keep the replies coming!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
lol, that was a bit of a rant but you get where I'm coming from, right? :)
 

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Well this is the argument my dad used when I wanted to lease. "Why would you put so much money into somebody else's horse? Why put in all that time and training just to have it taken away and you never get to reap what you sowed. Just buy a horse and all the money and time you put into it will come back to you."
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, and I hate it when he's in a lesson with a bad rider that let's him get away with stuff! Then my next ride, I have to work on correcting that, instead of focusing on something more important! Grr...
 
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Choosing your farrier (shoe or barefoot), your vet, and your feed/supplements is beneficial too. I don't have to ask "permission" to haul my horse off the property for an event (not that they ever said "no"...but it was courtesy to ask).
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I have to agree with the control thing. I was leasing before I adopted Hunter, BUT it was only $80 a month and I was basically the only one riding him, so that was a whole lot cheaper than owning. Now I fork out a heck of a lot more money but I wouldn't trade it for the world. I have had people ask me if I wanted to half lease Hunter but I just can't deal with someone else riding him and whatever they will do when I am not there.
 

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Having more say in the horse's care was important for me (I'm definitely particular about my horse's nutrition and hoof care), but the big thing that really got me motivated to buy instead of leasing was that I kept starting over again with lease horses.

The first horse I leased was older (mid-20's or so) and got retired after I had ridden her for a year or two, so I moved on to a new horse. I was definitely a beginner when I started riding her, and she was great to learn on. I don't think I would have been able to handle my 2nd lease horse if I had tried starting with him!

He was younger, but was suspected to have navicular disease and the owner decided to try a barefoot trimmer with him to see if he could be made more comfortable. After several months of not being able to ride him consistently I decided it was time to move on to another horse. It turned out later that whatever his issue was, it was confirmed by x-rays that it wasn't navicular, but to this day he's still lame some days and not-so-lame others. I did click with him very well and if I ever get my own horse property I'd love to buy him as a companion for my horse.

The third (and final) horse I leased was fine health-wise, but had a bit of a bucking problem :evil: I was pretty glad when his lease was up.

I lucked out that I had access to ride my leased horses pretty much whenever I wanted (even though the first 2 were technically half leases). None of them really had solid dressage foundations prior to my riding them, so I always ended up starting at the basics again and could never quite make it to 1st level before switching to a new horse for one reason or the other. The horse I ended up buying had some informal dressage training, but hadn't ever competed. I started him at intro level last year, and we just rode in our first recognized show at 1st level a couple months ago :)
 

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That reminds me of another one (that has been eluded to here).

Training.

I can spend my $$$ to get my horse trained in whatever disciplines I want. I'm not paying to train someone else's horse. We show, so getting Acey and my daughter specific lessons in our show disciplines is important.
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The title pretty much says it all, but before you reply make sure that you know I don't mean right off the bat, i mean like after someone has been leasing for several months to a year or longer, what aspects make owning the more beneficial of the two options. Don't post here if you are gonna tell us about the opposite, start your own thread for that and people can compare the two to see which one is best for them and their situation. Thanks!
Control.
You control the level of work of the horse, the type, the tack, his vaccination schedule, farrier schedule, food, etc etc.
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I definitely do not like the fact that you pay for a horse you have barely any control over. My reasoning is why pay for a horse when they aren't really yours and you most likely won't end up with them in the end. Why create that bond and then have it taken away?

Also yes, having someone else ride him is very irritating when you know they aren't the strongest of riders!
 

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Along with what others have said. (i'm a control freak about my horse)

You can buy all your own tack and know it will fit your horse, you can see your horse whenever, instead of 2 days a week or 3 whatever the case maybe.
 

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Control is a big factor, as it the feeling of ownership.

To me though the major issue is time. You lease out a horse and you put so much work into it. In my area you're more likely to find a young, slightly green horse on lease rather than a trained one. So you put months of riding, time, doing the hard work and then one day the owners say they want them back, and you have nothing to show for the work.

That happened to me once, kind of twice. The first time I leased a TB who needed so much work. I got heaps of lessons, rode everyday, took the horse everywhere and put so much work into it, with the understanding that while the owner could trail ride on the occasional weekend, I could have this horse as long as I wanted. Then she took him back because of things this guy said to impress her, and then it was in her interest to have him back.

The second time I almost did a similar thing. A young horse was for lease, 4 year old and I went out and rode it a few times, it was on a week by week type lease. And it just needed so much work. It was a nice little Quarter Horse and I thought if I put six months of good training into this horse they're going to up and sell it for thousands (they'd had it on the market before) and either I'll love it and buy it and practically pay for my own training, or they'll make a profit for work I've done. So I said no.

I've been looking for a new horse and my father keeps telling me to lease (he's non-horsey) but the big thing to me is that once I put some much thought, time and energy into a horse I couldn't stand it being taken back. I'll develop attachment and then be so sad. I only want to work with horses that belong to me because then I am responsible for everything, the consequences are mine and I can keep the horse for as long as I like.
 

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Control over the horse's health, which includes farrier, vet, training, tack, barn, diet, and style of being ridden.

Doesn't that make me sound crazy? Maybe I am. But I rather my horse be healthy and happy, and so I do what is needed to accomplish that.

~~

I've leased before and it's nice to pretend like the horse is yours, but at the end of the day the owner has the final say. And sometimes I just really did not agree with their choices at all.

~~~

Leasing is nice if you can't afford to keep a horse.. but of course there are downsides. 5Bijou5's post on what her father told her.. I disagree. I would agree if the person had the funds, but if they don't then they honestly can't go ahead and get a horse because the horse wouldn't be getting the care that it needs due to lack of funds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
All good points! Anyone else?
 

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I think the biggest thing about owning is having control. Before we bought my mare, the owner wouldn't let me show, and our relationship even started getting very iffy.
Now I have complete control of her training, schooling, and showing, and a lot more time to bond with the horse, thus creating a better relationship.
One more thing, I think you learn a lot more about horse care and training, and you become a better rider overall since when you're leasing, you dont have do deal with paying board, the vet, or shoeing (at least that was like my lease) so the responsibility is a little bit bigger I guess.
Because you ride the horse everyday, you'll get to know the horse better and will be able to train a lot more than leasing, so overall you improve on your riding.
Many of my friends went from leasing and showing 3ft-3ft3 to owning and showing 3ft9-4ft!
 
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