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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took in an under weight thoroughbred mare she was put in pasture with nothing else she has been checked by vet her teeth are good up to date Coggins and Dewormed she is on Nutrena Pro force Fuel 8 quarts in a day 4 in morning 4 at night as well as 2 quarts of soaked beet pulp and 24/7 turn out with free choice hay all day long with fresh water all day and mineral block
Horse Mammal Vertebrate Sorrel Mane
So what would you change or add and what would you do for exercise to prevent becoming hot
 

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I won't comment on the grain because I'm not familiar with it. The beet pulp is great. Is the 2 quarts after soaking, or before? And is it 2 quarts per meal or all together? You might be able to give her more.

Free choice hay is a fantastic start and what will help her the most. What kind of hay is she getting? Making part of that alfalfa hay (30% or so should suffice, so maybe two flakes a day?) can also help.

I wouldn't exercise her at all at this point, but give her space to run around if she feels like it. Right now she needs all of those calories for gaining fat, and likely won't be feeling too full of it anyways at this weight.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I won't comment on the grain because I'm not familiar with it. The beet pulp is great. Is the 2 quarts after soaking, or before? And is it 2 quarts per meal or all together? You might be able to give her more.

Free choice hay is a fantastic start and what will help her the most. What kind of hay is she getting? Making part of that alfalfa hay (30% or so should suffice, so maybe two flakes a day?) can also help.

I wouldn't exercise her at all at this point, but give her space to run around if she feels like it. Right now she needs all of those calories for gaining fat, and likely won't be feeling too full of it anyways at this weight.
The beet pulp is 1 quart before soaking twice a day to a total of 2 quarts. She has quite a bit of energy so far but the hay is coastal.. should I add alfalfa?
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I give Canola oil to horses I really want to see more weight on. Usually about 8 oz per day divided into two feedings. If you try it out, work up to it gradually by adding two ounces per week until you're up to however many you want to feed.
 

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If you can get it and she doesn't seem to be gaining on everything else, you might consider it. If she's gaining on what you have her on though, I'd say just let her be.
 

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It takes time, sounds like you are taking good care of her.
 

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Yup. Sounds like a great start. I have a 31 year old Tennessee Walker that has absolutely no back teeth and I use beet pulp to keep weight on him because he can't eat hay at all. When you say 1 quart per feeding before soaking are you talking about beet pulp pellets or shreds? The reason I ask is because the pellets expand to much more than a quart of shreds. I like using pellets if I have the time to soak because they really seem to give you more bang for your buck. I feed my boy about 2 lbs unsoaked per feeding which equals to about 1.5 quarts I think. But like I said, I have to make up for hay. Something else that I like to add which really makes a difference in my opinion is rice bran. Fortified is better but way more expensive. I buy the unfortified which is about $11 for a 50lb bag because I go through it quick enough that it doesn't go bad. THat's a big reason why people like the fortified better because it doesn't spoil like unfortified supposedly does. I've never had a bag go bad though. And like someone else already mentioned, I add oil but I use vegetable oil. I add about 1/2 cup per feeding. Good luck with your mare. I look forward to seeing improvement pics. :)
 

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I took in an under weight thoroughbred mare she was put in pasture with nothing else she has been checked by vet her teeth are good up to date Coggins and Dewormed she is on Nutrena Pro force Fuel 8 quarts in a day 4 in morning 4 at night as well as 2 quarts of soaked beet pulp and 24/7 turn out with free choice hay all day long with fresh water all day and mineral block
View attachment 366618
So what would you change or add and what would you do for exercise to prevent becoming hot
I won't go into the supplements for the needed minerals and amino acids. Just don't have the energy tonight and the information is available online anyway.

For good, healthy (i.e. works well with the equine digestive system, allowing for everything to work correctly without messing with things like the microbes needed for long fiber in the hindgut vs the undesirable ones that build up from grain), high calorie and easy to digest the best two things I know of are beet pulp and copra.
Beet pulp is easy to digest fiber for the hindgut with about 1/3 or more nutritional value than hay (depending on the hay for more than 1/3).
Copra is super easy to digest in the foregut and goes straight into their system from there. Loaded with calories.
Both basically have low NSC. Both are basically "cold" feeds (which is great). Beet pulp can have sugars if it's been treated with molasses, but that can be rinsed off when soaking. Or you can find some that hasn't been treated with molasses which doesn't have the sugar problem.

Keep the hay in front of them. Best quality you can find/afford. Once his conditioning improves you can cut back or the high quality stuff.

NOTE: All changes to diet need to be done gradually, with the new items increased in stages. Horses digestive systems do not tend to deal well with sudden/significant changes in their diet.

Not supper bad off from the picture. Shouldn't take terribly long before it's looking good. Remember not to over do it. They are better off being a little lean than they are being overweight (which tends to create even more problems). Better to have the ribs slightly visible (which is actually a good weight anyway) than to have to press to feel them (which to often tends to be the case).
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I won't go into the supplements for the needed minerals and amino acids. Just don't have the energy tonight and the information is available online anyway.

For good, healthy (i.e. works well with the equine digestive system, allowing for everything to work correctly without messing with things like the microbes needed for long fiber in the hindgut vs the undesirable ones that build up from grain), high calorie and easy to digest the best two things I know of are beet pulp and copra.
Beet pulp is easy to digest fiber for the hindgut with about 1/3 or more nutritional value than hay (depending on the hay for more than 1/3).
Copra is super easy to digest in the foregut and goes straight into their system from there. Loaded with calories.
Both basically have low NSC. Both are basically "cold" feeds (which is great). Beet pulp can have sugars if it's been treated with molasses, but that can be rinsed off when soaking. Or you can find some that hasn't been treated with molasses which doesn't have the sugar problem.

Keep the hay in front of them. Best quality you can find/afford. Once his conditioning improves you can cut back or the high quality stuff.

NOTE: All changes to diet need to be done gradually, with the new items increased in stages. Horses digestive systems do not tend to deal well with sudden/significant changes in their diet.

Not supper bad off from the picture. Shouldn't take terribly long before it's looking good. Remember not to over do it. They are better off being a little lean than they are being overweight (which tends to create even more problems). Better to have the ribs slightly visible (which is actually a good weight anyway) than to have to press to feel them (which to often tends to be the case).
Thanks she seems to be gaining nicely so far just have never had a horse this skinny...
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I can't help with the feed, I think everyone so far has done a great job with that already..

but one thing I would suggest is take body shots once a week, same angles each week. Because you see her every day, the changes will be less noticeable to you every day than they would be to someone who doesn't see her quite as often, and the photos will be a good measure of how fast she is gaining, and how much she needs to keep going
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can't help with the feed, I think everyone so far has done a great job with that already..

but one thing I would suggest is take body shots once a week, same angles each week. Because you see her every day, the changes will be less noticeable to you every day than they would be to someone who doesn't see her quite as often, and the photos will be a good measure of how fast she is gaining, and how much she needs to keep going
I have been taking body shots of her once a week since I got her.
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I would change to a high fat feed that's low starch/low sugar and aimed at horses that aren't in work but needing to gain weight - best suggestion from me would be a mix of
*Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage which also has fat, vitamins and minerals added but no molasses
Equine Supplements: Forage Feed With Equine Supplements From Triple Crown | Triple Crown Nutrition
*Triple Crown Low starch Pellets
Low Starch Horse Feed-Triple Crown's Low Starch Horse Feed Formula | Triple Crown Nutrition
You can add sugar feet (non molassed) and alfalfa pellets to that
Weigh everything according to the guidelines on the bags so you don't over feed vitamins and minerals
Avoiding high starch & molasses in feeds will mean the horse can gain weight without getting that 'sugar rush' that can cause a type of hyperactive state and irritability in some horses
Even though the horse has been wormed I would still either get a fecal test and a blood test to check for encysted worms - which will cause ulceration in the stomach and anemia and add an antacid to her feed for a while - I like U-Gard for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would change to a high fat feed that's low starch/low sugar and aimed at horses that aren't in work but needing to gain weight - best suggestion from me would be a mix of
*Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage which also has fat, vitamins and minerals added but no molasses
Equine Supplements: Forage Feed With Equine Supplements From Triple Crown | Triple Crown Nutrition
*Triple Crown Low starch Pellets
Low Starch Horse Feed-Triple Crown's Low Starch Horse Feed Formula | Triple Crown Nutrition
You can add sugar feet (non molassed) and alfalfa pellets to that
Weigh everything according to the guidelines on the bags so you don't over feed vitamins and minerals
Avoiding high starch & molasses in feeds will mean the horse can gain weight without getting that 'sugar rush' that can cause a type of hyperactive state and irritability in some horses
Even though the horse has been wormed I would still either get a fecal test and a blood test to check for encysted worms - which will cause ulceration in the stomach and anemia and add an antacid to her feed for a while - I like U-Gard for that.
So I think that's where I'm going wrong TO MUCH SUGAR!!!!!!!:-( She's on beet pulp (2 quarts before soaking a day) with molasses.......(that's all they had and told me it was good........ Not sure about my feed I'll post picture of guaranteed analysis.. give me one minute.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I would change to a high fat feed that's low starch/low sugar and aimed at horses that aren't in work but needing to gain weight - best suggestion from me would be a mix of
*Triple Crown Safe Starch Forage which also has fat, vitamins and minerals added but no molasses
Equine Supplements: Forage Feed With Equine Supplements From Triple Crown | Triple Crown Nutrition
*Triple Crown Low starch Pellets
Low Starch Horse Feed-Triple Crown's Low Starch Horse Feed Formula | Triple Crown Nutrition
You can add sugar feet (non molassed) and alfalfa pellets to that
Weigh everything according to the guidelines on the bags so you don't over feed vitamins and minerals
Avoiding high starch & molasses in feeds will mean the horse can gain weight without getting that 'sugar rush' that can cause a type of hyperactive state and irritability in some horses
Even though the horse has been wormed I would still either get a fecal test and a blood test to check for encysted worms - which will cause ulceration in the stomach and anemia and add an antacid to her feed for a while - I like U-Gard for that.
Text Font Line Document this is my feed
 

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I think what you're feeding might be OK for a horse that's in work so they're burning off the energy from those sugar calories but not for one that just wants to increase weight and stay quiet
If nothing else the IRS risks are too high - one of my mares was put on a Sweet Mix when she was on a boarding yard and even though she was in work and my TB on the same feed and the same work was OK - she developed IRS
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think what you're feeding might be OK for a horse that's in work so they're burning off the energy from those sugar calories but not for one that just wants to increase weight and stay quiet
If nothing else the IRS risks are too high - one of my mares was put on a Sweet Mix when she was on a boarding yard and even though she was in work and my TB on the same feed and the same work was OK - she developed IRS
Sorry but what is IRS?
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The only thing that I will say that may be different from everyone else is, Flax seed. I feed 6 oz (before soaking) to my two old boys feed. I usually soak it overnight with a cup of water. Another perk to the flax seed is that it helps remove sand from their gut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The only thing that I will say that may be different from everyone else is, Flax seed. I feed 6 oz (before soaking) to my two old boys feed. I usually soak it overnight with a cup of water. Another perk to the flax seed is that it helps remove sand from their gut.
A round about how much is flax seed.
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You will find that a lot of the good quality complete feeds already contain flax seed so check before you buy any
IRS stands for Insulin Resistance Syndrome. There's a lot of detailed info on the web and quite a lot of threads on this forum but this is the basics of it
Insulin Resistance
It is usually associated with obese horses but in fact a horse doesn't have to be overweight to get it as it seems to be linked to a genetic predisposition
If you can't get sugar beet without added molasses then rinse the soaked shreds through with clear water several times before feeding.
 

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You have had a lot of good advice here but I want to add something a bit off topic... THAT is a really nicely conformed horse. I cannot wait to see her filled out and fed up.. because at that point I will want to tell you what she would be good at (or tried at!).
 
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