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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm moving to a new barn this weekend and I wanted to get some opinions. Where my horse is at now, he's always turned out but will go in his stall for extreme cases of heat or cold. Where he will be going this weekend, he will always be out, regardless of temperatures. I know horses are pretty good about temperature regulation, but should I be concerned about that? I also know I worry about my animals way too much (I'm a new horse owner, so I don't know a whole lot about it.

Also, what are the pros and cons of field board vd. stall board?

Thanks!
 

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My horses live out 24/7 and they are perfectly fine. They do have a run in shed so that they can get out of rain and snow. Run ins stay nice and warm. Get all the horses in there and it starts to get really toasty. I hope the place you are taking them has a run in, or somewhere they can go to get out of the rain/snow, otherwise I wouldn't do it. The only real negative for keeping them outside is that I don't have a stall to tack up in and my horses are always dirty in the winter and spring. My horse has a white mane and tail, and it pretty much stays yellowish in the wintertime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My horses live out 24/7 and they are perfectly fine. They do have a run in shed so that they can get out of rain and snow. Run ins stay nice and warm. Get all the horses in there and it starts to get really toasty. I hope the place you are taking them has a run in, or somewhere they can go to get out of the rain/snow, otherwise I wouldn't do it. The only real negative for keeping them outside is that I don't have a stall to tack up in and my horses are always dirty in the winter and spring. My horse has a white mane and tail, and it pretty much stays yellowish in the wintertime.
Thanks for your input - where do you live?

Also, there are run-in sheds where he's going...I wouldn't put him somewhere where he couldn't get out of the elements.
 

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It depends. If you are staying at the same elevation, same latitude horses with a lot of turnout can adjust to more time outside with a run in shelter. My shelter off of my barn is 16' x 19', with my newly built ~30" wide manger on the north side (opening in SE side.)

ALSO, depends upon how many horses share the shelter. TODAY, it's sloppy and likely that my mare will get kicked out of the shelter by gelding#1 and gelding#2, so she's inside all day. This is a consideration bc you don't want your horse to be the one without shelter in a storm.
ICE is the next consideration. Horses can adapt to Alaska winter temperatures--takes about 2 years, they say--but ice can break knee caps and mess up their backs if they slip. I kept horses outside w/a shelter for 14 years and I'll never do it 24/7 in the winter again.
Now for summer, my herd never see their stalls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It depends. If you are staying at the same elevation, same latitude horses with a lot of turnout can adjust to more time outside with a run in shelter. My shelter off of my barn is 16' x 19', with my newly built ~30" wide manger on the north side (opening in SE side.)

ALSO, depends upon how many horses share the shelter. TODAY, it's sloppy and likely that my mare will get kicked out of the shelter by gelding#1 and gelding#2, so she's inside all day. This is a consideration bc you don't want your horse to be the one without shelter in a storm.
ICE is the next consideration. Horses can adapt to Alaska winter temperatures--takes about 2 years, they say--but ice can break knee caps and mess up their backs if they slip. I kept horses outside w/a shelter for 14 years and I'll never do it 24/7 in the winter again.
Now for summer, my herd never see their stalls.
I thank your for your input as well! As far as I know, there will only be two horses (including him) in this paddock. About the same elevation, I'm only moving him 12 miles down the road.
 

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I live in upstate NY, so it never really gets awful here. Winters are normally between 0-20 degrees (with the exception of this winter of course). We also have never had more than 3 horses sharing one shelter so we have never had a problem with horses not sharing the space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I live in upstate NY, so it never really gets awful here. Winters are normally between 0-20 degrees (with the exception of this winter of course). We also have never had more than 3 horses sharing one shelter so we have never had a problem with horses not sharing the space.
Ok, I'm in Northern VA, so I'd imagine our winters pale in comparison to yours (with the exception of this year, too).
 

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My horse is out 24/7. Even in that horrible winter we had last year in the Northeast, he was fine. As long as their is a dry shelter to go to, don't worry about him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My horse is out 24/7. Even in that horrible winter we had last year in the Northeast, he was fine. As long as their is a dry shelter to go to, don't worry about him.
Ok, thanks...that makes me feel better.

Also, do you know what's the coldest it can be outside without having to blanket them? I don't clip my horse, but he also doesn't grow a really thick natural coat - it doesn't grow that long or thick. I only have a heavy weight for him right now, but I'll usually rug him up if it's under 30.


By the way, the move went well, and I think he enjoys his new pasture buddy. I also walked out and checked out the run-in, and it's big and dry. :)
 
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