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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

After a bit of advice. Yesterday I visited a horse who I am considering taking on part loan, he's a 21 year, 15,3 Danish warmblood, real beautiful boy. Here's my dilemma, I have been riding again for the past 8 months since giving up as a child, I've been having weekly riding lessons on very safe riding school horses. So I went to visit the new horse yesterday, the owner had assured me that he was an old school master very safe to ride and would be perfect to bring on my riding. After a chat about the ins and outs of the loan she asked if I wanted to ride him to get a feel of him, which I did. We took him into the school where I walked, trot and cantered him, all seemed to be going well, even though he's a lot more forward to the horses I'm used to riding. Anyway I decided to take him for one last trot where he flew into canter, which then proceeded into a buckaroo session of about 8 in a row, I managed to sit most of them but then lost my balance and hit the deck. Now here's my question, should I still consider him for part loan? My worry is because I'm used to riding school horses my riding may not be strong enough for him, although the owner assures me that it was totally out of character and he's usually and old gentleman. She said she had just clipped him so he might of been a bit fresh. We have agreed for me to go and spend a day with them both next week and she did say that she would be haspy to be there whilst I rode him in the school whilst me and horse get to know each other. So what should I do? Just sticking to the riding school does not get me used to a more forward horse but am I ready for a stronger horse, if I don't ride different horses I will never learn.

Any help appreciated.
 

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Horses don't just suddenly buck for no reason. I'd say he was either sore, or isn't as quiet as the owner led you to believe. Did they get on and ride him first? If not, next time you go see him have her ride him through all paces first before you get on. If you're not comfortable then you're better off walking away.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi, thanks for the reply. No she didn't ride him first, although she said she had taken him out in the morning, she did say though that she hadn't been riding him much due to time, this did worry me a little. I have spoken to her since and she suggested lunging him next time to burn off some energy. I am worried hes not as much of a safe ride as she says he is.
 

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If he hasn't been ridden in a while then that could explain things, although I would expect a schoolmaster of that age to take to time off better than that.

Have her ride him first this time. If she refuses, then walk away. If you don't feel comfortable getting on him again, walk away. If he shows any signs of misbehaving again, walk away. It might seem a shame to pass him up, but it'll be more of a shame if he ruins how far you've come.
 

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Talk to your trainer. If your doing lessons he/she should be able to tell if you can handle this horse or not. There is one at my barn that I am seriously considering buying & my trainer told me to hold off cause at the leval I'm at right now, it wouldn't be a good match
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's what I was thinking. Um going to talk to her at my next lesson and see if she will come and visit the yard and meet him and give me her views on if we are suitable for each other, if I go ahead I will see if she will come and continue my lessons with him. Thank you for your reply :)
 

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Definitely bring your instructor. If s/he is a good teacher, they should know when to push you to a more forward moving horse and let you know if you can handle that horse.

I have come to learn that age doesn't mean anything when it comes to gauging a horses experience. That is 21 long years of you don't know what the heck happened to this horse. I rode an 18 year old paint mare that had 2 speeds. "Turtle Walk", and "Go Like Hell". There was no trot, there was no slow canter; there was walk, and canter-borderline-hand-gallop. 20's is middle age, if they've been well taken care of then they have a ton of prime time energy to keep going for at least another 10 years.

This horse might be a school master but that doesn't mean he won't take advantage of beginner/weaker adult riders, even though he could be a dead head plug for children. A good school master is a horse that has been through the competition ropes, is good enough to still compete and take intermediate riders through competition, and is smart enough to be to advance for beginner riders. In my opinion. That should be something to consider. If you are ready to move up, they will make you step up your riding. If you're not though, that is okay too. Just be honest with yourself, and know what you can handle.
 
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