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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a thought I've been curious about. How can people afford to breed to a stallion with a $8500 stud fee and yes I can name one at the top of my head. Is it the experience in the horse business that is working for them and being able sell and what not to be able to breed at that price?

I'd have to take out a loan for that stud fee alone!! Of course, I'm currently 19, so maybe many years down the road when I finish my degree in business I'll have a chance after saving money from a job if I can find one.... How would you decide when breeding your mares what the right price is for a perticular stud is? I'm seeing world champs under 1000 with full bookings, a few other world contenders(at least) around 1500-3000. With the economy still down, I think I should most likely stick to the SSA breedings for a few good years :)
 

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Some folks actually will put a stud fee on a credit card or take a signature loan. Bad business if you ask me, if I don't have the cash, I don't need the breeding. Also, always ask for some kind of discount, it's very rare to pay full price for a breeding to any stallion these days. If they won't come down at least half, if you have a really high quality well bred mare, go look at 1/2 price furturity auctions and buy from another stallion.
 

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Do you know what kind of horse you can buy for $8,500 right now? And it's already broke... you can buy the color you want and the sex you want... and it'll have a show record...

Ah, where there is more money than sense!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Do you know what kind of horse you can buy for $8,500 right now? And it's already broke... you can buy the color you want and the sex you want... and it'll have a show record...

Ah, where there is more money than sense!
In general, I could think about a lot of things to do with that kind of money. I'm feeling for the SSA breeds. 1/2 price. You almost couldn't beat it if that's the stud you want, but otherwise anyone could do better.
 

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Do you know what kind of horse you can buy for $8,500 right now? And it's already broke... you can buy the color you want and the sex you want... and it'll have a show record...

Ah, where there is more money than sense!
Yes, but you don't pay an $8500 stud fee to breed an $8500 horse. You pay an $8500 fee to breed a $40,000 horse...the same percentages that would cost you a $530 stud fee to breed a $2,500 horse.

The entire question is a bit academic. Why do people pay $80,000 for a Mercedes when they can buy a chevy for $25,000? Well, one is a Chevy and the other is a Mercedes. Why do people pay $2000 for a purebred dog when they can pick up a perfectly good, lovable dog at a shelter for $40 or $50? Or designer jeans vs. Walmart specials...and so it goes...
 

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That kind of logic makes me happy I never became involved in sport horses.
 

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Do you know what kind of horse you can buy for $8,500 right now? And it's already broke... you can buy the color you want and the sex you want... and it'll have a show record...

Ah, where there is more money than sense!

IN a reiner? Not much.
 
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Keep in mind like Face said you do not pay that kind of stud fee on a $5K horse. You set a goal and you work that goal. I set goals from 2-5 years then 5-10 years. Then I work things to I can get to those goals. Right now my goal in 3-5 years is to have a Gunner foal. Again I will have nothing out of pocket into that foal. You have to make your horses work for you when it comes to these things.
 

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As was already said, the people using studs with stud fees of that price or higher aren't going oh, I think I'll breed my pwetty mare that's done nothing but I wuv her soooo much.

They've got their beautifully conformed mare that's proven herself and has great bloodlines, done their research on stallions and have a PLAN for the foal. They aren't breeding a trail horse or a sit in the backyard and go for a pleasure ride occasionally horse.

It's still a gamble though, the stud fee for my horse was WAY more than $8500. His breeder took a world champion halter horse stud and bred it to a proven mare because he wanted a stud that he was hoping would also be a world champion and earn $$$ in stud fees. Well ooopsie.... he ended up with my non-stud quality, goofy lil guy that he ended up gelding and practically giving away to a trainer as he had no use for him. I'm ecstatic as I ended up with one heck of a gelding who had an extremely reasonable price tag as the trainer's costs in starting him were minimal.
 

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When you say you have no out of pocket fees on obtaining these foals and mares, how do you go about doing that? I don't understand not having anything in a horse at all when, from my experience, they are money pitts, lol.
 

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When you say you have no out of pocket fees on obtaining these foals and mares, how do you go about doing that? I don't understand not having anything in a horse at all when, from my experience, they are money pitts, lol.

But their now if you look at it as a business. I started out about 15 or so years ago with 2 nice horses. Not world beaters by any means but nuce horses. One was a stallion (Still have him and he is a proven sire) The other was a nice ranch bred mare who was well put together and a nice mare. Between these 2 horses selling foals and stud fees. They paid for the cost of buying them and buying my next stallion prospect. With the money I have made on these horses through earnings stud fees selling foals and so on I bought anouther really nice mare. Then bred her to a very nice proven stallion still have the resulting mare then bred her to my Doc O'Lena stallion sold that foal sold that stallion and so on. Took that money and bought anouther mare. Used 2 of her foals to pay for her training and showing to prove her out and so on. Basically instead of buying a lot of Ok horses I use what I have to buy very good mares and pay stud fees. I will inturn sell the foal coming this spring which will pay for a better stud fee plus some. Then I will sell that foal which in turn will pay for an even better stud fee then some. Will most likely pick up anouther top bred mare and contiune on. Also I still do stand Te to a select mares which brings in money. Have a contest going now for a free breeding to him. So at the end of the day the horses bring in more then what goes out. I do not have a lot of horses but what I have are well bred well conformed and proven.
 

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I wouldn't pay that as a stallion fee. Too many risks, too many bad people (Reiner, you should contact FehrGroundRanch re: a Gunner foal. Good luck.)
I bought an accomplished stallion that I know has the conformation and ability I want, saw what he produced (actually bought a baby of his before I bought him) and I dont have much for guesswork.
I have another young upcoming prospect that will outcross great with fillies from my first guy if he makes it in the show ring ( and judging by his spins and hock work already, I've got high hopes for a reiner!).
There are two other reining stallions I wouldnt mind outcrossing on, but even their fees aren't that high.
 

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If I was in the breeding business, and had a mare that was worth a fair chunk, I definitely wouldn't be breeding her to the $2000 stud down the road. I would be looking for the stud with the $20,000 fee, and get a high quality baby out of it.

Breed crap to crap, and you are likely to get more crap.
 

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If your mare is really good you can get a nice stallion for $2K or less that will get you a nice return on your money. Keep in mind that it is a % game. You can pay $20K all day long but if your mare is not good enough you will never get it back. However if you have a mare who is good enough for a $20K stud fee and you breed her to a nice $2K stallion at the end of the day you will do much better as a % of the out lay. Not to mention of you pick the correct cross you will still end up with a very very nice marketable foal who will do very well. I can show examples of this all day long. It comes down to picking the correct cross and what you expect as to what you will get out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I agree nrhareiner, I'm starting to get better with crossing the right horses now I think. :)
 
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