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Hi all. I am just seeking some reassurance. Sloane colicked earlier this week. It started Sunday morning when I found him lying down in his stall. He does this occasionally, but this time He would get up and then lie down again and I knew something was wrong. He had no temperature, few gut sounds and rapid respiration. My barn manager suggested banamine and walking him around and thought it might be gas. I telephoned the vet who approved these measures and advised feeding him small amounts during the day, all of which I did. By evening he seemed better and was eating, but the next day he was lying down again and I called the vet. A rectal revealed an impaction but no twisting. He got tubed with fluid and mineral oil and put on a soupy mash for feed. He has a bad tooth which is scheduled for extraction so he is now on bute for pain. His feed was switched from whole oats, which he was aparently unable to chew and was just swallowing down, to a senior feed. He is eating, pooping small amounts regularly, but not drinking much. He is going out with his pasture mates. The vet is not concerned saying he gets water from his feed. I know it is silly but I feel like he is now depressed. He is a very mellow horse but now seems kind of down. Can it take 4 days to recover from this kind of colic?
 

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Sometimes it can take a month or two for them to get back to normal. Adding in the worry factor and it feels like longer. It all depends on the colic situation. I might even suggest giving some ulcer guard since you have done both banamine and bute in a short amount of time. (That was what my vet had suggested when I was in a similar situation).
 

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I don’t have any advice as thankfully I’ve never had to deal with colic (knock on wood) but I hope he feels better soon. That must be so stressful!
 
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Hi all. I am just seeking some reassurance. Sloane colicked earlier this week. It started Sunday morning when I found him lying down in his stall. He does this occasionally, but this time He would get up and then lie down again
1. How occasional is “occasionally” And how old is he?

I would be concerned about hanging lipomas in the hind gut; seems to be common in older geldings and stallions. I lost a horse to a major colic due to lipomas and it was gut wrenching.

They can be operated on, if one has the $$$$ and is close to an equine hospital.. My horse was 27, it was four hours in the trailer to the hospital, and the vet said he was too weak for a trip like that as he insides had flipped———-


There are several credible articles regarding hanging lipomas, if you google the term:)

2. Unless he is on quality, moist pasture from a lot of rain, I disagree with the vet regarding water. He won’t get moisture from his hay or his feed pan.

Horses should consume ~10 gallons of water daily. Unless you know he is getting at least eight gallons of water into himself daily, I would consider giving him electrolytes.

If his manure piles are still smaller and he is leaving less piles than what is normal for him, I would be concerned.

His digestive system is still stressed. The tooth extraction will help. It would be great if it resolves the ”occasional” colic issues but theres a 50-50 chance it won’t:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
1. How occasional is “occasionally” And how old is he?

I would be concerned about hanging lipomas in the hind gut; seems to be common in older geldings and stallions. I lost a horse to a major colic due to lipomas and it was gut wrenching.

They can be operated on, if one has the $$$$ and is close to an equine hospital.. My horse was 27, it was four hours in the trailer to the hospital, and the vet said he was too weak for a trip like that as he insides had flipped———-


There are several credible articles regarding hanging lipomas, if you google the term:)

2. Unless he is on quality, moist pasture from a lot of rain, I disagree with the vet regarding water. He won’t get moisture from his hay or his feed pan.

Horses should consume ~10 gallons of water daily. Unless you know he is getting at least eight gallons of water into himself daily, I would consider giving him electrolytes.

If his manure piles are still smaller and he is leaving less piles than what is normal for him, I would be concerned.

His digestive system is still stressed. The tooth extraction will help. It would be great if it resolves the ”occasional” colic issues but theres a 50-50 chance it won’t:)
This is the first colic since i have had him. He is older and has had to have all his incisors extracted due to EOTRH, now it has affected one of his lower canines. He gets canola oil with his feed. I tried gatorade in the water but he was not interested. I also tried warming up the water thinking the cold might hurt his tooth--also no dice. I just got an update from my barn owner; he drank a bit last night and there is a good amount of normal poop in his stall as well as urine. If he has lipomas I cannot afford surgery, nor do I want to do that at his age. I have had two friends' horses have to be put down because of this. I hope that this is not what is wrong.
 

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Something that I just tried out (and encourages my sometimes reluctant drinker) is to put a handful of senior feed in a bucket with warmish water (if your climate is cold) and offer it that way. The feed will flavor the water a bit and it must be tasty according to my mare, as she drinks it right up when refusing plain water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Something that I just tried out (and encourages my sometimes reluctant drinker) is to put a handful of senior feed in a bucket with warmish water (if your climate is cold) and offer it that way. The feed will flavor the water a bit and it must be tasty according to my mare, as she drinks it right up when refusing plain water.
Good suggestion, thank you. I am in upstate New York where the water can get really cold. We have no hot water at the barn so offering him warmish water is difficult, but I am certain the cold does not feel good on his bad tooth.
 

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With my older guy (He made it to 36) I would haul warm water to the barn at night. I also soaked his alfalfa pellets in water. I did not soak his grain because he wouldn't eat it soaked - the alfalfa pellets he did not mind eating wet. If your horse is low on teeth and is being fed regular hay then he's probably just chewing it into cuds and spitting it out. He may not be getting enough roughage which would explain the colic.

I would suggest soaked hay pellets twice a day but still allow the regular hay.

I would not be surprised if he doesn't drop some weight - that's fairly normal after a colic so don't freak too much.
 
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Good suggestion, thank you. I am in upstate New York where the water can get really cold. We have no hot water at the barn so offering him warmish water is difficult, but I am certain the cold does not feel good on his bad tooth.
How about bringing a thermos with really hot water to the barn and just add it to the cold water in a bucket?
Or at one place there was an outlet in the barn and we just brought an electric kettle to boil some water and added tat to the buckets...
 
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