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What is everyone’s opinion on aging a horse by their teeth?
I have always been told different things by different people. Some people I’m close to say that it is decently accurate and others say it’s not at all.

I have a gelding who’s past is pretty unclear. I got him almost 8 years ago as a 12 year old so he would be almost 20 now.
I had a dentist out a few days ago. She seemed very knowledgeable and a lot of people recommended her to me. She said after looking at his physical condition and his teeth that she was very confident that he was not 20, and he was more like 15, 17 at the oldest.
I know there is no way to know how old he is 100% but how accurate do you think you can age with teeth?
 

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I think they can get a person pretty close to the real age — Howeverrrr, LoL —-

Years ago, a vet aged my Arab/Saddlebred 6-7 years younger than he was. I said “ no he is THIS age”. The vet said “no, he is closer to the age I say”.

I said “no he IS the age I say because he was born in my parents farm when I was 13, so there is no question of his age.”

The vet hrumpfed then grudgingly commented I had taken very good care of the horse.

It was not so much my care, as it was just who the horse was:).

Years later I rescued a starving Arab (including his papers) who had the “teeth of an 80 year old human” when he was only seven. He lost two of his molars when he got older and I had to have one pulled.
 

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The equine dentist a few months ago aged my mare about 3 or 4 years younger than she actually is. He was pretty certain of it too until I told him she was only a few months old when she was rescued so her age is relatively certain, at least to the year, only +- a couple months. Agree with @walkinthewalk. Useful but take it with a grain of salt. Some can be spot on, some can be years off, and unless you know the real birth year, you can't really ever know 100%.
 

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Yeah, my pony gets “aged” about eight years younger than he is as well.

There are certain landmarks that erupt within a time period and some that disappear within a time period but it’s like babies getting teeth. My nine year old has her twelve year molars a dentist would tell me she’s older, lol.

A good deal probably relates to diet and genetics.
 

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In my younger days - a long time ago, once a horse reached 8 years then it was classed as 'aged' because it was never possible to accurately age them after that.

You can get a rough idea but that is all.
 

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Estimating the age of a horse by examining its teeth is a common practice. For very young horses, eruption dates are useful, but in general, the place to start is examination of the occlusal surface of the lower incisors. Similar changes occur on the upper incisors, but it is typically easier to get a good look at the lowers.
 

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I used to do it all the time and check my estimation against the registration papers. I was pretty accurate for the most part. But I haven't done it for a while and I noticed I'm not as good as I used to be cuz I tried doing it a couple of weeks ago and I was wrong, by 5 years!
 
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