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SO I am hauling Klassy to the new training barn tomarrow to better work on our training with our trainer, but um... al of a sudden she has decided not to load, I think she is scared cause when I last loaded her she was with another mare, and when she was tied next to the horse on the out side of the trailer the other mare spooked and ran into klassy and I was wrapping her hind legs and luckly didnt get hurt at all, than god for moving fast! but when she got out she was jut sweaty and shaking like i have never seen. Every other time i have hauled her she has been an angel just loads up after gvingthe trailer a look inside and stands, and then backs out fine. but when I moved her from a break at pasture and went to laod her up it took me 3 hours, and she threw EVERYTHING at me!

rearing, bucking, kicking out and striking out, spinning, backing up way fast, acting spooked.

I fianly got her in by getting anothe rhorse n and it still took a while but does anyone have any suggestions, I will be working with her on it after I move her but havent had the time and now feel bad. She has never been ina straight load, but thats okay for now, we arnt loading her one yet. all the trailers she has been ina huge stock trailers.

HELP!? I dont want to die loading my horse, or have her get hurt.
 

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What helps is to put the trailer in a small pasture with JUST your horse in it, and put the hay and grain in the trailer and leave. If she doesn't go in, she doesn't eat.

It sounds SUPER cruel, but its not. If they are hungry they will go in the trailer.


*Make sure the trailer is hitched to something, and make sure the door is tied open so it doesn't slam or anything.
 

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The only thing you can really do is make the trailer a great place to be and everywhere else uncomfortable for her. You might want to give yourself a few hours to work with her on getting her in. You could try putting her in circles (by circles I mean making her work, not just walking around smelling the flowers...you want to get your point across and make it clear where you want her) releasing the pressure when she is at the door to the trailer and adding pressure everywhere else. You want her to realize the trailer is where she can stand and relax. Dont get yourself run over by doing this or try blocking her and making her go in, just be patient and let her figure out that your release of pressure is at the trailer or in it. Give yourself and her LOTS of time. Dont try this when you have 5 minutes to get her in because you will only set her up for failure and further frustration. Take little steps, when she looks in the trailer let her stop and think about it then try again, maybe the next time she will think about maybe stepping in....patience is your going to be your best bet.
 

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I hate feeding a horse in my trailer. I just hate having to clean it (I'm a clean freak when it comes to the trailer.) I use a john lyons method. I take a long crop, or lunge line and as the horse to take a few steps forward towards the trainer, if the horse ignores me they get tapped by the whip untill they go forward. You can back the horse up if she gets nervous. Dont let her back up on her own though, ask her forward again if that happens. You have to release/reward you horse for every step. A reward can be as simple as stoping for a second or a pat. If you need to ask the vet for a SMALL amount of sedative, but I dont like to use it. You probably arent going to get her on if you have a day. Dont force her, she'll only get more scared. loading a buddy can help. or even taking a buddy for the ride might ease her fears.

My mare went from not wanting to get near the trailer to practically loading herself right on. But it took several sessions over several weeks. If you have access to a trailer you should have already been working on this.
 

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SaraHershey's method can work really well. It's basically how we load our semi-wild cattle when necessary.

What I would do, since your mare is afraid and not just refusing to load, is to just see how close she's willing to get to the trailer, and let her stand at that point. Even if she's 30 feet away and to scared to get closer, let her stand where she is just getting nervous, and let her get comfortable there. When she's relaxed (lowered head, blinking, cocking hind leg, willing to graze, licking lips, etc.), ask her to come closer, until she starts acting unsure, and let her get comfortable again. Expect to spend a while at it, building her confidence about being near, and eventually on, the trailer.

I also like Clinton Anderson's version of "work 'em outside, offer rest on or near the trailer," but that may be a bit stressful for a truly frightened horse. The technique you use will depend entirely on your horse's unique issue.

Good luck!
 

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The worst thing you can do when you finally get a horse to load is to slam the gate and haul down the road. Take plenty of time and don't try to force your horse in. You should have been working on this problem long before now. I would call the trainer and tell him I may not be there. Take the time needed to get the horse right.
 

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I have this pet pieve with people trying to beat their horses on the trailer with brooms. I see it all the time. Those horses usually end up being dangerous.

It takes a patient person to get a horse used to being loaded. Why not get the trainer to help you?
 

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Paint gurl and sillybunny, that's exactly how I train my horses to load. Life outside the float is uncomfortable, life inside the float is lovely.
Sillybunny, that's the method I use. Any movement that isn't forward towards the float gets a continuous tapp from a stiff whip or similar, and any step towards the float gets the pressure off.

Putting food in the float and leaving it in the paddock for the horse to work out. Well yes, the horse will walk into the float... but it's going to run straight out backwards after every mouthfull. And then eventually when it will stand in there to eat, i would put money on it that the horse will run out again as soon as you make an attempt to put the back up and lock the poor ****** in there. And then what happens when you get to a show/lesson and have no food to bribe the horse in there? No way in hell is that horse going to go into that float with no insentive. You may as well train properly from the start and avoid silly hastles like that.
 

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Putting food in the float and leaving it in the paddock for the horse to work out. Well yes, the horse will walk into the float... but it's going to run straight out backwards after every mouthfull. And then eventually when it will stand in there to eat, i would put money on it that the horse will run out again as soon as you make an attempt to put the back up and lock the poor ****** in there. And then what happens when you get to a show/lesson and have no food to bribe the horse in there? No way in hell is that horse going to go into that float with no insentive. You may as well train properly from the start and avoid silly hastles like that.

^^ Good advice
 

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Oh and please PLEASE do NOT try to tie the horse in the float without having the back done up PLEASE!!! I've seen this happen to one of the horse I trained to float. The owner took over from me once I was happy with the progress the horse was making (he was self loading confidently, I had done the back up etc. and he was fine, I just didn't think he was ready to go for an outing to a comp or such as yet)
Owner got too keen, put him in the float, tied him to the front (which by the way was a metal chain with a snap hook- she tied him from the chain direct to his halter, then went back to do the back up.
Of course, horse goes MENTAL falls over, almost breaks it's neck because of course the chain didn't break. Owner finally gets the hook undone, horse flips over backwards, slides down the ramp gets up and goes into a blind panic. Owner grabs horse, ties it to about an inch of the float, walks off and leaves it to go mental.

Horse has now got a new owner and the poor guy is only just starting to work out that the float isn't going to kill him, but still sweats up so badly that the floor is a puddle by the end of the trip.
 

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I always wonder where people think thier horses are going to go when they tie them into a two horse trailer. I rarely tie my horses in a stock trailer and I would never tie them in a two horse.
 

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I tie mine as I have a stallion divider in the float and usually float with two horses- I'm not keen on having them get their head around behind the divider... If you have to hit the breaks you'll have a horse with a broken neck. Without a divider however, I don't usually bother. Although I do like my horses to ground tie anyway so usually they don't move in the float.
 

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I always wonder where people think thier horses are going to go when they tie them into a two horse trailer. I rarely tie my horses in a stock trailer and I would never tie them in a two horse.
To be honest I would rather tie with a safety hook, than not tie, especially in a two horse; if they try to turn around, he can seriously injure himself, or get seriously wedged! Better safe than sorry in my opinion :wink:

To the OP, I had a horse who had a 'scarey' incident due to the people who were boarding him at the time, trying to load him for me; even though I had expressly told them NOT to! He was barely at a place of trusting me very well, and they were never out there, so I know he didn't trust them. Anyway, when I finally worked on getting him back in a trailer again, I simply made the trailer the ONLY place that got him a breather.

As long as he would walk foward toward the trailer (at first he'd only come within 10 feet, then panic), I wouldn't pressure him, but when he put the brakes on, or started going backwards or sideways away from it, I put him to work. I did this for well over 45 minutes the first time I loaded him; but eventually he walked in without fear, or hesitation. After that day, too, he never had an issue with loading, and I could load him into any trailer. Make what you are asking easy, and what you don't desire, more uncomfortable, and your horse will understand quickly what it is you want.

Any time you simply stand there pulling on a horse, or tapping his rear when he's already panicked, you set yourself up for more resistence, and potentially damage, to you or your helpers. So keep his feet moving, in a constructive fashion (ie, lunging) and you will help your horse stay focused, and get more of a grip on what you want from him, without getting hurt.
 

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I strongly agree with the John Lyon's method of trailer loading....it is tried an true.

I have used his method on 2 horses that were rather violent about loading, and with plenty of patience both horses were taught to load and unload calmly without issue. :D
 

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To be honest I would rather tie with a safety hook, than not tie, especially in a two horse; if they try to turn around, he can seriously injure himself, or get seriously wedged! Better safe than sorry in my opinion :wink:

To the OP, I had a horse who had a 'scarey' incident due to the people who were boarding him at the time, trying to load him for me; even though I had expressly told them NOT to! He was barely at a place of trusting me very well, and they were never out there, so I know he didn't trust them. Anyway, when I finally worked on getting him back in a trailer again, I simply made the trailer the ONLY place that got him a breather.

As long as he would walk foward toward the trailer (at first he'd only come within 10 feet, then panic), I wouldn't pressure him, but when he put the brakes on, or started going backwards or sideways away from it, I put him to work. I did this for well over 45 minutes the first time I loaded him; but eventually he walked in without fear, or hesitation. After that day, too, he never had an issue with loading, and I could load him into any trailer. Make what you are asking easy, and what you don't desire, more uncomfortable, and your horse will understand quickly what it is you want.

Any time you simply stand there pulling on a horse, or tapping his rear when he's already panicked, you set yourself up for more resistence, and potentially damage, to you or your helpers. So keep his feet moving, in a constructive fashion (ie, lunging) and you will help your horse stay focused, and get more of a grip on what you want from him, without getting hurt.
Thats the only method I use and have never run into those issues? it's just a variation of putting the horse to work- discomfort out of the float, comfort in the float. By using a long whip or similar, you can put yourself out of the way of being in danger. Plus I have am issue with turning horses away from the float. They WANT to face away from the float so that is giving relief from pressure each time they turn away or move further from the float
 
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