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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was just brought up to me that my saddle does not fit my horse, and I am going to be trying out new saddles and want to make sure I am putting them in the correct spot.
 

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I would like to see pictures of the saddle on the back, girthed or cinched up but without a saddle pad obscuring the view.

Actually, I think both saddle placements may be to far back.
Difficult to really tell with all that padding in the way of the shoulder/scapula line...and the sweet spot the saddle should "set" into when placing it...

To me, both of your cinch/girth are not straight & perpendicular to the ground... they are both at a angle...
English saddle the girth is pulling backward where it attaches to the billets.
Western saddle...IDK , just don't think it right.
Your horse has a considerable dip behind the wither bone and a prominent wither too...

I wonder if just doing a built up pad carefully placed in the cantle area would solve many issues by leveling out the saddle. You do need to be careful that the saddle head {pommel} does not come down and pinch the wither/shoulder joint area when the gullet sinks down.

May be a tough fit.
 

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English saddle is wayyyy too far forward. You need around 3" between the horse's scapula and the saddle. I would say the western saddle is too far forward also, though not as bad.
 

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I would say that both saddle are about right, maybe the English slightly far back, but pretty well done with both! If you are unsure, look it up but I'd say that you are doing really well! The saddle should almost 'click' into place - it should get to a point when you are placing it where it just stays. This is usually the place where the saddle should be :) But id you are in any doubt, look it up - this is just my opinion! :) Good luck with your horse! :D
 

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for the english saddle:

Find your horse's scapula. Mark the rear edge with a piece of chalk or some corn starch.
Now find the tree points on the saddle. If you don't know what/where they are, lift up the flap so that you can see the billets. The tree points are sitting in the pocket right in front of the billets, and are rigid. Now place the saddle so that those tree points sit a minimum of 3 fingerwidths (about 2") behind the back of the scapula. Depending on the saddle and your horse's build, the saddle can go a little further back, but no closer to the scapula. It doesn't matter where the saddle's flap sits relative to the scapula. It's the rigid tree points that need to stay clear. Do this without a pad so you can really see and feel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all very much. I will get pics hopefully tomorrow with out the pads.
 

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I have absolutely no input about the English saddle as I know nothing about them.

Your western saddle looks to be a tad bit forward but it might be deceiving as your horse has a straighter shoulder angle. Was the picture taken before or after riding? Does your saddle shift in either direction after riding?
 

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When you place either saddle on the horse, place it a little too far forward then rock it side to side. It will start moving back as you do this. At first it will be easy then it will seem to lock in place. That is where you want the saddle. Double check that either the bars or the points are behind the shoulder blade. Do up the cinch as normal then check that you can put two fingers (hand turned sideways) between the gullet and the horse. After 10 min of riding, check again. Your weight will create compression. If there isn't good clearance, the saddle isn't for that horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have absolutely no input about the English saddle as I know nothing about them.

Your western saddle looks to be a tad bit forward but it might be deceiving as your horse has a straighter shoulder angle. Was the picture taken before or after riding? Does your saddle shift in either direction after riding?
This was taken before riding. I can't say that it shifts when I ride. It stays pretty even I think.
 

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I have to agree with Sullysrider. The English saddle is way to far forward. The stirrup leathers should fall perpendicular to the ground with the saddle in the right position. Slide the saddle back a bit and notice how the leathers will hang straighter.
 

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Need to see a lot more pictures of the western saddle to determine if it fits correctly. Can't tell much from the single picture you posted last.

In your previous pictures, I would guess that your western saddle is too far forward. Even look at your cinch. It's behind the saddle. Your horse has a steeper shoulder. You don't want your saddle to interfere with that shoulder movement. I want you to walk your horse around, and put your hand on their shoulder blade. Feel how that shoulder moves as your horse walks. Then place your saddle (without a pad first) on your horse's back, and walk your horse around again, feeling for that shoulder movement. If your saddle is "blocking" that movement, you have it too far forward. The shoulder needs to be able to move freely.

The majority of people place their Western saddles too far forward.
 
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