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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I attempted something I’ve never done before. I was fiddling around in the barn, and the horse was being nosy.

I put a bit of string around her neck and hopped on board. We walked around the barn once and did a few small circles, left and right. No problems. She turns left easier than right, but she’s the same under tack.

Skippy was still hanging around when I finished fiddling around in the barn.

I hopped back on with the neck string, and let her carry me from the barn to the pasture gate, maybe 300 meters.

She occasionally needed a bit of tugging on the string, and some insistence with the inside heel on the turns.

I dismounted, and gave her some scratches on the withers, neck, and face. Then, she turned and cantered off to rejoin her buddies , the cows.
 

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She's a sweet little horse and seems to enjoy being with you, that's great and says a lot about how you handle and work with her.
Are you getting the other mare that you were looking at? I wonder if she will be as sweet
 

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That has got to be one of the best feelings!!

I did pretty much the same with my (then) 3.5 yo mare, decided out of the blue to use her leadrope around her neck in the field - we did w/t/c, simple changes.. it was an amazing feeling of connectedness and partnership :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
She's a sweet little horse and seems to enjoy being with you, that's great and says a lot about how you handle and work with her.
Are you getting the other mare that you were looking at? I wonder if she will be as sweet
I suspect most of that is that she knows I keep the feed in the barn. Lol. But she was too young for much riding when I first got her. So we spent a lot of time grooming, tending feet, leading, and ground driving.

We decided against the little buttermilk dun. She may or may not be pregnant. She may or may not be trained to accept a rider. And the owner is now waffling on his price.

We will get the brown and white one in the latest horse shopping thread. Biggest concern I have on that one is the aggressive nature.

Then my sister said, “Sounds like every Shetland pony I ever met.”

Pending proof of ownership, we will pick it up the end of October.
 

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Oh, that sounds very promising! I missed the horse shopping thread about the brown/white.


The dun........how can one not know if their horse is broke to ride!? People are interesting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Oh, that sounds very promising! I missed the horse shopping thread about the brown/white.


The dun........how can one not know if their horse is broke to ride!? People are interesting!
He uses them as broodmares. He said he found a neighbor’s stallion loose with his picketed mares one morning. Sounds a bit like one of @Foxhunter stories.

Around here, if some brave soul can jump on it, yell “heeyah!” And run around a bit without getting dumped, the horse is considered trained.

That’s what they want to do when demonstrating a horse for me. I have to stop them and explain that I want to see it walk calmly, turn left and right, and stop away from the people.

Here’s the brown & white one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Back on topic. I let the horse carry me from the barn to the gate again today. Then, I had to fetch something from the barn later. The horse was still near the gate, so I hopped on for a return trip.

I’ve been keeping a halter and lead up near the house in case I needed to go fetch the horse. Now I think I only need to carry a string in my pocket.

We’ll see how it goes if I deviate from what we’ve been doing.
 

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Cordillera Sis and I went out for a nice ride through her woods today, I rode the gelding we bought this year and she rode the little 12.1H pony she got for the granddaughters just to keep her riding and quiet enough for the girls and the little mare was perfect on the trail, even had to give the big goofy gelding a lead across the stream.

Your new prospect seems quite nice and if she is a bit aggressive I'm sure you can work with her and overcome it easily. You will have to keep us posted on your progress with her.
 

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He uses them as broodmares. He said he found a neighbor’s stallion loose with his picketed mares one morning. Sounds a bit like one of @Foxhunter stories.

Around here, if some brave soul can jump on it, yell “heeyah!” And run around a bit without getting dumped, the horse is considered trained.

That’s what they want to do when demonstrating a horse for me. I have to stop them and explain that I want to see it walk calmly, turn left and right, and stop away from the people.

Here’s the brown & white one.
Pretty little pony:)

I have to laugh because there are so many things wrong with that picture, in the new era of horse ownership, lollollol.

For my part, I do not see anything wrong, but I'll betcha there are people reaching for their oxygen mask over the shorts, flip flops, no helmet, and reins in one hand, ROFL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Had to go down to the barn just before sundown today. The horse and cows were hanging around near the pasture gate. I took the string from my pocket and rode the horse to the barn without problems.

I put a bit of rice bran into a feed pan as a reward. Skippy worked on that while I finished up what I was doing. By then, the cows had come to investigate.

I knew Skippy would not want to leave the cows and any bit of food that might be left. I decided to see if I could get her to do something she didn’t want to do with only the string for control.


She reluctantly moved off with me, away from the cows and feed pans. The first time she tried to turn back, I was able to convince her to keep going.

The second time, I wasn’t able to turn her back. She headed back towards the barn at an easy lope. She didn’t try to dump me, but the footing wasn’t good. I Waited for better before deciding whether to bail or attempt a whoa.

We went over a pile of sand and gravel, then came to firm, level ground. A firm pull on the string, and a gruff “Ho!” Got hr stopped. We turned around and headed back towards the gate.

She tried to turn back three more times, but not as enthusiastically as before. Though it did take a more firm pull on the string, and a more insistent drumming with the inside heel.

Again, I gave her some scratches on her favorite spots before releasing her. She paused, I think just to see if more scratches were coming, then headed back to the barn and the cows, bucking and farting.
 
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