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Discussion Starter · #1 ·








It was a 2'9 clinic that focused on short corners and tight turns, just curious to hear what you guys think we should be working on.
 

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My only real critique would be: I would like to see a bit more release.

Your first picture is the best. Your leg is solid, you're giving an appropriate auto release, and you can see your horse is comfortable with the whole thing by his ears being forward and keen to the next fence. I like that your back is flat, your leg remains at a nice position at the girth, your heel down, and always looking to your next fence. Very nice.
 

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I agree. A little more release, but other than that, you look good !
 

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I agree with needing to give more of a release. Also, while your heels look good, your toes seem too jammed outward. Try to keep them pointing forward. Otherwise, you guys look really good!
 

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Toes in, a tiny bit more release, and give me your eq so that I can have it too :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Agh! It's funny because the last time I posted a critique thread I was berated for having too much release :lol: but we've been working on keeping connection and starting to achieve an auto release so we're getting there... slowly.
 

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I disagree about the release 100% You are following through nicely with your hands and maintaining a light contact with your pony's mouth.
Your basic position is good however, your toes are turning out which puts the back of your calf on the horse's side. It also takes your knee away from the saddle. (there should be no grease on the seam of your boots) An exercise you can do to aid this is when you get on and several times during a ride, put your hand under your thigh from behind and pull everything to the back. This puts your thigh flat on the saddle, knee in close contact and toe forward. It will feel strange to start but then becomes natural.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you, Foxhunter. I was hoping for some sort of exercise suggestion to come out of this thread :wink: I should probably jump back on the 'no stirrup work' band wagon too but I've been seriously neglecting that...

I would be curious to see what some others think about my release as well... we've come from

this:



and Jackson definitely wasn't happy with the zero contact, we had lots of problems over and after fences. He's a much much happier horse having some connection over the jumps.
 

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Agreed on more release. Work on keeping your toes more forward during your flat work. It's a bad habit to accidentally spur your horse. The world's best jumpers do NOT interfere with their horse after the takeoff.
Your eyes forward and following the line to the next jump. =D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm definitely following the line to the next jump :lol: I wish I had video on the computer, I've never encountered anything quite so bendy so I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with 'eyes forward'.
 

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You were really quite accurate to just about every fence. That is tough when you're galloping around. I love the noise of your horse's hooves when he gallops by the camera! haha!!
Only thing i might add to my critique would be that you need to work on getting him to supple and bend around your leg. He's counter bending all over the place and if you were coming to a fence quickly out of a corner, or a roll back and he was all counter bent and didn't have his eye on the fence, you might get yourself into trouble.
But either way... i like the videos. It shows me a great rider, and a horse that likes to jump! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
He does love to jump, the problem is his flat work :lol:
He's pretty crafty with his feet, but as we've started schooling into the three footers his corners and grumpiness with bending is getting us into tight spots with knocked rails, so that makes sense. We've started to do more suppling work in our lessons and I'm looking for different ones to do at home (any suggestions guys?) he's finally clued in to what moving off of and bending around the leg means, we just have to get it translating into the jumper ring.
 

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I really, really like how stable and calm you are. You're not disturbing the horse and he has his freedom to jump. You seem to be pretty well balanced and in my opinion giving him all the release he needs in this height. Looking at the pictures and videos I would recomend some work with two-point to get the knees more closer to the saddle. No pinching just holding you there.
 
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