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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dear little Angelina will turn 29 next month. She’s a sturdy little Morgan and in general good health but for one thing: she has a very arthritic left knee and last fall my vet told me, sadly, that She is no longer rideable ( he thinks she was born with a bowleg that hasn’t bothered her until now.) I started giving her a natural supplement for arthritis, and my farrier thinks she has shown some improvement, but though she doesn’t exactly favor that leg, she walks very slowly.
I spend a lot of time grooming her and giving her treats and she’s fed and has her lean-to cleaned twice a day. I also hand-graze her in the backyard when the weather is nice. My question is, can anyone suggest any other activities I can do with her that she might enjoy? Because of her knee, I’m reluctant to even take her for a walk.
I love her dearly (she’s my first and probably only horse) and I’d like to spend quality time with her before she’s gone.
Thanks to all and any suggestions 🙂
 

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I think just spending time with her....the animal knows you care, that you are present for her...they just know!

Just a thought...something to consider..
Have you looked into maybe dissolving some of the arthritis, flushing the joint and replacing with fake the synovial fluid?
I use to ride reining horses and some of the older horses were stiff and arthritic....it was not a horror of a procedure to the animal.
2-parts that I can remember...
First part was injection of hyaluronic acid & some kind of steroid to dissolve the deposit build-up in the joint that gave discomfort...reduce some of the inflammation.
Was left for a few days then vet came back and the joint was now flushed clean and "fake" fluid now inserted for the cushioning of the bones.
The horses seemed to be less stiff and happier.
It was a local anesthetic used with a sedative so quiet for the procedure...
If something like that might give her some relief....at her age I would not be doing invasive anything unless life threatening.
To make her daily existence easier...maybe something to speak to your vet about.
I know x-rays and ultrasounds were done before the procedure for best information so it was better known extent and finished result.
Since cat scans are so expensive {or were} and you needed to go to a facility that had that equipment, alternatives that lameness vets had on hand of x-ray and ultrasounds were used instead.

If it could make Angelina's knee less restricted in movement, reduce discomfort and pain...it would not hurt to discuss with the vet.
Just daily walks with her to keep her moving may actually help loosen that joint some...stiff to start out then a bit looser as the time together spent walking slowly works some more magic...
As said, just a thought...
🐴...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think just spending time with her....the animal knows you care, that you are present for her...they just know!

Just a thought...something to consider..
Have you looked into maybe dissolving some of the arthritis, flushing the joint and replacing with fake the synovial fluid?
I use to ride reining horses and some of the older horses were stiff and arthritic....it was not a horror of a procedure to the animal.
2-parts that I can remember...
First part was injection of hyaluronic acid & some kind of steroid to dissolve the deposit build-up in the joint that gave discomfort...reduce some of the inflammation.
Was left for a few days then vet came back and the joint was now flushed clean and "fake" fluid now inserted for the cushioning of the bones.
The horses seemed to be less stiff and happier.
It was a local anesthetic used with a sedative so quiet for the procedure...
If something like that might give her some relief....at her age I would not be doing invasive anything unless life threatening.
To make her daily existence easier...maybe something to speak to your vet about.
I know x-rays and ultrasounds were done before the procedure for best information so it was better known extent and finished result.
Since cat scans are so expensive {or were} and you needed to go to a facility that had that equipment, alternatives that lameness vets had on hand of x-ray and ultrasounds were used instead.

If it could make Angelina's knee less restricted in movement, reduce discomfort and pain...it would not hurt to discuss with the vet.
Just daily walks with her to keep her moving may actually help loosen that joint some...stiff to start out then a bit looser as the time together spent walking slowly works some more magic...
As said, just a thought...
🐴...
Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with me! I’ll ask Doc about it when he comes out to vaccinate her...it sounds like it might be a rather pricey proposition though. 😟
I will take your advice to start walking her, maybe beginning at a short distance and gradually increasing it? I guess they do say that people with arthritis—-myself included—need to keep moving! So why not horses too (slaps self on forehead)
Again, many thanks!
 

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You should make her one of those cute little birthday cakes. Made with you know, horse appropriate foods of course!

I think you are doing a really great job with her, I can't really add anything else!
 
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Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with me! I’ll ask Doc about it when he comes out to vaccinate her...it sounds like it might be a rather pricey proposition though. 😟
I will take your advice to start walking her, maybe beginning at a short distance and gradually increasing it? I guess they do say that people with arthritis—-myself included—need to keep moving! So why not horses too (slaps self on forehead)
Again, many thanks!
Oh definitely walking is good. You don’t need to do it for very long or go very far, but I know with my senior mare (who’s in her late 20s, early 30s) movement is really important. You can let her set the pace, and adjust your time/distance if she shows improvement. I was able to start ponying my mare again last year after handwalking was getting to be quite a handful (And now she’s getting full of herself while ponying too).
 

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Have you considered putting her on Previcox? It can make a world of difference for an arthritic horse. I notice a huge difference with my horse, when she's on a low daily dose vs. not on it. A lot less stiff, a lot more comfortable. Mine doesn't have acute arthritis, just a bit of it kind of everywhere, with general age-related stiffness. But it's a medication that helps a lot of horses!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You should make her one of those cute little birthday cakes. Made with you know, horse appropriate foods of course!

I think you are doing a really great job with her, I can't really add anything else!
Thank you Palfrey my friend...you don’t know how much that means to me 🙂
I thought about a birthday cake made with grain and chopped carrots, held together with molasses, lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you considered putting her on Previcox? It can make a world of difference for an arthritic horse. I notice a huge difference with my horse, when she's on a low daily dose vs. not on it. A lot less stiff, a lot more comfortable. Mine doesn't have acute arthritis, just a bit of it kind of everywhere, with general age-related stiffness. But it's a medication that helps a lot of horses!
Thank you Steady! Is that a prescription that I’d get from my vet? I’m not familiar with the product but I’d sure like to keep her more comfortable.
 

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Thank you Steady! Is that a prescription that I’d get from my vet? I’m not familiar with the product but I’d sure like to keep her more comfortable.
Yes it is! It's also marketed under the name Equioxx. They're the same medication, though.

It's fairly affordable, and the risks are minor and just require some initial, and annual follow-up (though a lot of people don't bother, whether they should or not) bloodwork. In some horses it can contribute to ulcers but I have known many horses who have been on a longterm maintenance dose (mine included) with no ill effects. Your vet may advise having kidney function checked first to make sure they can handle the medication all right, and occasionally follow up on that to check levels.

It's somewhat similar to ibuprofen for humans. It's an NSAID -- non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. Keeps their inflammation levels down which helps with pain and can help slow the progression of the arthritis somewhat, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes it is! It's also marketed under the name Equioxx. They're the same medication, though.

It's fairly affordable, and the risks are minor and just require some initial, and annual follow-up (though a lot of people don't bother, whether they should or not) bloodwork. In some horses it can contribute to ulcers but I have known many horses who have been on a longterm maintenance dose (mine included) with no ill effects. Your vet may advise having kidney function checked first to make sure they can handle the medication all right, and occasionally follow up on that to check levels.

It's somewhat similar to ibuprofen for humans. It's an NSAID -- non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. Keeps their inflammation levels down which helps with pain and can help slow the progression of the arthritis somewhat, too.
Thank you!
 
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