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Welcome back Trissicar!

If I remember correctly you do mainly hunters, right?

At the lower levels it's really not too different from jumping an intricate eq course. Although I ride my jumpers a little differently then I ride my hunters. I get them more on their haunch (less long and low) and ride them right up to the base of the jump so they can power over.

When it comes to remembering courses the main difference is that you shouldn't try to remember by saying, outside, diagonal, outside etc like you would a hunter round. You need to start memorizing each jump by the number. That's jump one, that's jump two, etc. when the jump off comes around then you can just remember, it's jump 4, 2, 5, 3, 1. You'll also need to remember how many strides are in between each jump. Always walk your course so you know how each jump will ride, and that helps me remember the course. I know several people who bring notebooks with them on the course walk so they can write everything down.

DON'T worry about speed when you first start! My absolute biggest pet peeve are those maniacs to just run around as fast as they can. believe me, when the jumps get bigger it will bite them in the butt. You get speed from making tighter turns, jumping at an angle, etc. So on the flat you want to get your horse as rideable as possible. flatwork, flatwork, flatwork!
 

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Excellent advice, upnover!
I recommend watching as many riders as you can while waiting for your turn; you can see what they do and monitor tough spots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Excellent advice, upnover!
I recommend watching as many riders as you can while waiting for your turn; you can see what they do and monitor tough spots.
I find watching really good riders is good for me. Cause I'm a very visual learner.

Welcome back Trissicar!

If I remember correctly you do mainly hunters, right?

At the lower levels it's really not too different from jumping an intricate eq course. Although I ride my jumpers a little differently then I ride my hunters. I get them more on their haunch (less long and low) and ride them right up to the base of the jump so they can power over.

When it comes to remembering courses the main difference is that you shouldn't try to remember by saying, outside, diagonal, outside etc like you would a hunter round. You need to start memorizing each jump by the number. That's jump one, that's jump two, etc. when the jump off comes around then you can just remember, it's jump 4, 2, 5, 3, 1. You'll also need to remember how many strides are in between each jump. Always walk your course so you know how each jump will ride, and that helps me remember the course. I know several people who bring notebooks with them on the course walk so they can write everything down.

DON'T worry about speed when you first start! My absolute biggest pet peeve are those maniacs to just run around as fast as they can. believe me, when the jumps get bigger it will bite them in the butt. You get speed from making tighter turns, jumping at an angle, etc. So on the flat you want to get your horse as rideable as possible. flatwork, flatwork, flatwork!
Yeah I'm not so much worried about that because thats a big part of our training already. She can do shoulder in & out, leg yields,halfpass,haunches in, and such. So she gets a pretty good work out right now were working on collecting and lengthening. So yeah making her rideable and adjustable.I'm not really nervous I'm just thinking like idk what things i should do like should wear like since most of the people around me wear polo shirts for jumpers. And like what tips for remembering the courses. Which you covered. First and foremost I just want it to be a positive experience for my horse this wiill be her first time showing in jumpers too. She loves it.:)
And be4 anyone asks yes I can ask my trainer but she is very busy and I want different opinions.
 

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Jumpers seem to be fairly relaxed about attire. Some people wear white breeches, shirt with rat-catcher, and jacket:







Some wear just a show shirt:


Others wear tidy, clean breeches, and a nice polo shirt:




As for equine attire -- check the rulebook for any regulations. Usually you're allowed front and hind boots, a colored pad, martingale and/or breastplate, spurs, and a whip (regulation size.)
 

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Thanx JDI! Good examples.
I've been told your not supposed to wear white breeches unless you've been in a grand prix.

Actually white breeches are required in any jumper class where "Formal Attire" is requested, like a Classic (or a grand prix). That's where you see most of those riders above wearing the white show shirt, dark coat, and white breeches.

**You should NOT wear them in classes that are not formal! It would be like wearing a ballgown to a local bingo hall.
 

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According to the USEF rulebook.....

Informal Attire:

• Stick (Longer whip acceptable, up to 30”)
• Gloves
• Black, approved hard hat (see USEF GR 318)
• Hair up under hat in hairnet
• Ratcatcher and coat unless coats are waived by show committee, in that case, a polo or turtle neck is appropriate (a shirt with a collar and sleeves is required)
• Breeches: Beige, Lt. Gray, Rust, Dk. Gray, French Blue, Sage/Olive,
• Belt
• Tall Boots: Black or Dark Brown
• Spurs
• Gloves


Jumpers Formal - Classics and Grand Prix

• Black approved hard hat (see USEF GR 318)
• Hair up under hat with hairnet
• White Ratcatcher or (White shirt and tie for men)
• Dark coat or Scarlet if representing U.S. or Rec. Hunt
• White Breeches
• Black Boots
• Black Gloves
• Spurs/whips up to 30”



A lot of it will depend on what show you're going to. A lot of the A shows around here can be more casual and it's not uncommon to see people in polos (neat, conservative, and TUCKED IN!). But in Wellington there wasn't a single person not in a show shirt and hunt coat.
 

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another bit of info I'll add to the mix... know your tables!! (Table II Section 2(B) and such) It makes it much easier to remember when and how to ride your jump off! If you aren't sure what I mean let me know and I'll clarify which table is which.
 

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Remeber to walk the course lol seems quite obvious but in my excitement Ive forgotten to walk it a few times lol:$
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
another bit of info I'll add to the mix... know your tables!! (Table II Section 2(B) and such) It makes it much easier to remember when and how to ride your jump off! If you aren't sure what I mean let me know and I'll clarify which table is which.
Yeah I don't quite 'get' tables. I mean I know your jumpoff usualy is very similar to your first course but shorter. But yeah but yeah I've always wondered about that. :think:Explain please? :hug:
 

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As said, walk the course numerous times.

Go slow when first starting. Beginners are so eager to "go for the time" that they totally sabotage their horse. Ride your first jump courses like a hunter course (with tight turns) to let your horse know that they are NOT to go crashing around the course. Once you establish that with your horse, you can increase your speeds gradually and with the necessities ...bend, balance and engagement.

Speeds kills, slow and clean = fast.
 

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Yep - excatly. I have seen an amazing winning ride by a rider who kept the same rhythm as in the Hunter Ring, just rode smarter turns and rollbacks - they cleaned house.

They beat every other rider out ther chasing their horses, which resulted in flat, heavy on the forehand mounts - which also resulted in hard to guide horses because they were on their front ends instead of their back ends.
 

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On the course diagram they will write a "table" on there. It's basically the "rules" of how that class will be ridden and when to do the jump off. Ever notice how in grand prix classes everyone always waits until the end for the jump off? and how in "normal" jumper classes people do the jump off immediately after their round? different table.

There are a million different tables but I'll list the more popular ones you'll be most likely to see:

**Table II Section 2(b) : What most people think of. You go and do your first round. Any faults you leave the ring. if not you wait until the buzzer goes off. I think you have 45 seconds to make it through the timers to begin your jump off.

**Table II Section 2(c) : You go and do your first round and assuming it's all clear IMMEDIATELY proceed to the jump off. So there are like 15 jumps in a row and you need to know exactly where the cut off for the first round is and where the jump off begins. I've had them do it in the middle of a line before. If you were not clear the buzzer will go off after your last jump of your 1st round to excuse you from the ring. This table is often called "Power and Speed" because when you watch people ride it, they start off slower and more careful and then pick up the pace.

Table II : Prize lists will often refer to these as "blue ribbon classes". Basically if you're double clear, you get a blue ribbon. Personally I think it's kind of dumb, but a good course designer will make a Table II class really challenging so you're not handing out blues left and right.

Table II Section 1 : Timed first round. No jump off. All based on whoever's fastest with the least number of faults. I've only done these a few times. I personally think it's the show manager's way to move things along. :)

Does that make sense? So you get to your show, look at your course diagram, and at the bottom it says, Table II Section 2 (b). Ah, you immediately know there will be 2 distinct phases between your round and the jump off. There are a million tables (ok, so only like 10) but the main ones you'll see are the top 2 I listed. I've done a blue ribbon class like, once, I've done a Timed First Round a few times... There was one show that was had "Optimal Time" (I forget what table it was). Basically they had a set time everything should be and you got time faults for going over or under that time. If it helps a lot of people use nicknames. More often then not people will use the term "Power and Speed" instead of Table II Section 2 (c), but the course diagram will always use the Table.

Make sense? Sorry that's so long. This is maybe one of the bigger differences in an eq course and a jumper course, learning how to ride each table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Alright I see thank you very much. I think I will go look at the rule book. But that gives me a good idea what to expect.:D
 
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