The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My horse and my colt both have turn out blankets for the winter season. I take them off during the warmer days, and put them back on for the cold nights. Since they're waterproof turnouts (Tough1 brands) I use them for when it's icy rain and snow. However, due to horse sweat and rain they're starting to smell a little. I'm probably not going to put a whole lot into cleaning them while it's still winter, but I was wondering if anyone had any tips to get them clean for storage in the spring. I didn't think I could put them in my own washer and dryer because of all the hardware, and my mom suggested just taking them to the cleaners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
If you live in a horsey area, you'll probably be able to find a "blanket cleaning service" that you can drop them off to. They'll wash, repair, re-waterproof as needed.

Or, you can sneak them into the laundromat. I do that... it takes a few drive-bys to figure out an optimum time to sneak them in when not that many people are around, though ;-). I try to fold them so they look like (very dirty) sleeping bags, no straps hanging out. Then afterwards try to keep drips to a minimum as I take them back to the car. Then, before I leave I run the machines while they're empty to get excess dirt/hair out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hmm. That's a good suggestion! Personally, I'd spend the money to send it to a professional to get it repaired and cleaned, but my fiance says "What? It only costs a couple bucks at the laundromat!" So it looks like I'll have to sneak them in in the spring ;)

Maybe I'll clean it myself, but at least get it re- waterproofed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
I re-waterproof mine with Camp Dry, the stuff for tents. Pretty cheap at Walmart!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
awesome! Thanks for the tip!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,176 Posts
How soon do blankets lose their waterproof properties? I never thought of re-waterproofing them. Do Camp Dry render the fabric no longer breatheable?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
Around here there is a washateria that everyone uses the super capacity washer at to do theirs. Next warm day mine are headed to the fence to get a washing from the pressure washer, then hung to dry.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
When I cleaned my blanket for summer storage, I used the 'heavy' cycle on my washing machine- the machine is fine. Just never, never put them in the dryer. Ever. It melts the straps and messes up the fabric.
After washing it I always re-waterproof with campdry or a similar product. It costs around 8-10 dollars. Just use a whole can of it per blanket, and do it outside. I draped mine over a couple lawn chairs to do it.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
Local tack shop here charges $15 and returns them sealed up for summer storage. Since my horse has put two tiny holes in her new turnout, I am going to have them clean it once it warms up here, since they'll repair the holes for only a few dollars more.

I used a pressure washer on her old blanket and then draped it over the fencing to dry. Worked well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,903 Posts
How soon do blankets lose their waterproof properties? I never thought of re-waterproofing them. Do Camp Dry render the fabric no longer breatheable?
This is the second winter for 2 of my horses' medium weights. I didn't re-waterproof them after washing them last spring and I have noticed that if the horses are out in a downpour, they'll be a little damp under the seams... nothing major, but they are totally waterproof anymore, just very water resistant.

I ususally re-waterproof mine every year, but last spring it was stuck on the "back burner" and didn't happen. Camp Dry doesn't affect breathability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,909 Posts
I take a stiff brush and hose. Hose them, clean with brush, hose again, clean again, etc... So far worked for 4 seasons already... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I did it!

After the freezing rain we had the other day, their blankets were frozen stiff. We weren't expecting any more rain, so I took them off to thaw out and to wash (Gingers had poop on it >_<). So I took them to the laundromat today in a big bucket and slipped them into the high capacity washers. Duncan's little 28'' blanket made so much noise!!

I was nervous someone was going to say something, but the girl working there just kept popping her gum and talking on her cell phone.

Warm, dry, Febreezed and re- waterproofed (bought suff at Wal mart) are going back on the horses today. Yay!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
How tough is the nylon of your two blankets? Last spring I took a 600D turnout to the laundromat and it got kinda destroyed. The lining got ripped in the machine at the laundromat. I had already fixed it once after another horse in the herd bit a HUGE hole in it, so in disgust I threw it out. This spring I'll probably use one of those $20 services with the blanket I got to replace that one. It's not that much more expensive than the laundromat (those giant 3- or 5-loader machines are EXPENSIVE!) and will save me time and hassle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
I normally wash my blankeys at a local unattended laudromat after each use. Now, for me that means after they have been worn for several days, maybe a week, because my horses don't have shelter in their pasture and we sometimes get a cold rain and/or snow and wind. The blankeys that I have are several different kinds but all are waterproof and insulated.

I STRONGLY encourage you to at least wash and then store them after all the bad weather. I "stored" mine all summer (with the honorable intention of taking care of them!!) on top of our well housing. When I went to put them on, still not cleaned, this fall, I noticed white fuzzy stuff. Thinking it was mice, I was upset. But the more I looked, it was WASPS! And they had eaten huge holes through ALL layers of blankey--cordura, insulation and lining. After a few disgusted words, my next thought was, "Wow. What kind of honey does that make?" One blankey was repairable; one I worked on all day and finally gave up.

Moral of this story--wash and store promptly and correctly.

PS--it was a huge wasp nest. I could see the outlines of it on the well housing. A couple of feet long and 6-8" wide. There were still some wasps inside the blankeys. Fortunately with a nest that big, it was cold enough that they were moving very slowly.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top