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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Ya`ll! I am new to this site and have a question about my appaloosa gelding.
He is a 2 1/2 year old Blue roan appy who I`ve had since June.

I`ve been researching different patterns recenty to try and figure out what pattern he is. I thought he was a blanket, but I found pictures of Varnish roans and I`m not sure right now. He has some spots, but they aren`t very well defined. His coat has changed a little bitg since We`ve gotten him. Could his coat change a little bit more as he gets older?
here are some pictures of a blue roan blanket and a varnish roan for relevance. any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

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I'm no expert by any means, but I have a varnish leopard blanket Appy gelding myself. I'm having a hard time getting a clear look at your picture, but does he have mottling around the eye, muzzle, and anus and striping on the hooves? Those are common characteristics of the leopard gene expression which I believe is required to be considered varnish.
 

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Your gelding appears to be a chestnut with frost or snowflake pattern. We have a chestnut mare with the same coat pattern. She is 21 now and has gotten whiter as she has gotten older. She has never developed a big white blanket with spots or even big spots.
I have attached pics of my blanketed gelding and our frosted mare. The gelding was born with a blanket (he was born here) and the mare was mostly solid chestnut when we got her at age 7. She is 21 now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the replies!
I should clarify that my Appy is the one on the bottom.the top two images are from google.
yes, he has mottling around the muzzle eyes, and anus. He has two striped hooves and two white hooves. The white hooves are white because he has socks on those legs. I will definitely look into him being a chestnut, but for now I`m still calling him a roan. Maybe his coat will change a bit as he ages too.
 

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...yes, he has mottling around the muzzle eyes, and anus. He has two striped hooves and two white hooves.
In this case I think he'd be considered a varnish instead of a roan. It is my understanding that the leopard gene creates the roan-like appearance along with the other attributes we are discussing. You'll most likely get some color changes as he ages.
 

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Here are the recognized coat patterns

Coat Patterns

A remarkable aspect of the Appaloosa is the myriad of color and pattern combinations he can exhibit. The following are seven common terms used to describe Appaloosa patterns. The description used by the Registration Department differs slightly. Appaloosa patterns are highly variable and there are many which may not fit into specific categories easily.
Blanket - refers to a horse which has a solid white area normally over, but not limited to, the hip area with a contrasting base color.
Spots - refers to a horse which has white or dark spots over all or a portion of its body.
Blanket With Spots - refers to a horse with a white blanket which has dark spots within the white. The spots are usually the same color as the horse's base color.
Roan - A horse exhibiting the Appaloosa roan pattern develops a lighter colored area on the forehead, jowls and frontal bones of the face, over the back, loin and hips. Darker areas may appear along the frontal bones of the face as well and also on the legs, stifle, above the eye, point of the hip and behind the elbow. Without an apparent Appaloosa blanket or spots, a horse with only the above-listed characteristics will also need mottled skin and one other characteristic to qualify for regular registration.
Roan Blanket - refers to a horse having the roan pattern consisting of a mixture of light and dark hairs, over a portion of the body. The blanket normally occurs over, but is not limited to, the hip area.
Roan Blanket With Spots - refers to a horse with a roan blanket which has white and/or dark spots within the roan area.
Solid - refers to a horse which has a base color as is described above pages but no contrasting color in the form of an Appaloosa coat pattern. This horse will need mottled skin and one other characteristic to receive regular papers.
 

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If you're going off the ApHC standards that @carshon posted and that I just looked into further in their rulebook on their website (starting on page 52), it looks like they'd define it as a red roan with a white star, stripe, and snip and two stockings. The front one might be considered a half stocking since it only appears to go up about half way on the cannon bone. My understanding is that blue roans have black and white hairs while yours clearly looks brown/red.
 
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