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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
//spell check ruined the title

I'm thinking of possibly purchasing a lipizzan in later to come years, and I was wondering they were even easy to keep? Would they be good for a first time backyard horse? Are they cheap at boarding places? Are they hard to clean?
Any help would be highly appreciated!
 

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We have a lot of Lipizzaners around here. Easily half the horses in the country are Lipizzaners - most without papers. I'm not sure of the practicalities because I never had them but I find them to be rather hot, in an unpleasant way. I know they are classed as warmblooded but somehow I keep seeing very nervous and stubborn examples. (If you didn't guess, I don't really like them). It could be that the ones I keep seeing aren't very well bred and/or not well trained. Around here they are usually kept by men, women don't like them much due to their disposition.

As far as keeping clean, they seem to be remarkably easy to keep clean for gray horses. People who keep them around here aren't exactly concerned with cleanliness but I've never seen a dirty one. Must be something to do with their hair type.

I will ask my BO today for more info and get back to you, she has much more experience with horses than me. She never buys them either, I'm not sure why.
 

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I don't have one or now anyone personaly that owns them, but I am from Slovenia and have hone to Lipica (they breed lipizzamers) more than once. Last time I went it was some cind of special day, so they had an awosome performance. Thay had police horses (they acted out an arrest with shouting, police sirens, smoke...), a group of women rode side-saddle, dressage, tricks (going on hind legs and then jumped and kicked with the hind legs), cart pulling...
They are talented horses, but they are not good for show jumping (their hind ends are too heavy, which makes them very god at standing on their hind legs).
This is what I have seen and heard about these horses, it may or may not be true.

Sorry I do not have answeres for your questions. :(

What would you want the horse for?

PS: Please ignore my spelling mistaces.


Poslano z mojega SM-G800F z uporabo Tapatalk
 

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Lips do tend to be easy keepers... but each horse is an individual and can vary. The ines I knew and worked with tended to need to be on diets on decent work and could not be on lush grass.

They are smart horses and require a SMART, thinking rider. If you aren't smarter than they are you may have trouble. I enjoy working with them, but found them to be honor students needing to be kept emotionally and physically busy. If you don't, they come up with evil ways to take over the world.

Conformationally; they are built very compact and tend to be able to collect better than they extend. Some have more extravagant conformation flaws than others. Well bred animals are ALWAYS better than poor bred to get a quality shoulder and hip.

Keeping a grey clean can be a challenge particularly on the days you NEED them clean. I have a barn of 5 greys and some days it feels like I have given 10 baths;) Quality horsekeeping (with proper manure management and plenty of space), a healthy horse and a good grooming the best way to try to keep your grey grey. But some days they with roll in poo just to spite you.
 

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:faceshot::gallop:I love, love, love white horses......alas hard to keep clean. I went to Spain on a 2 week riding vacation & rode a few Lipnzzaners on mountain trails. They are very sure footed & make great trail horses. The ones I rode with were well behaved, one even fell asleep on the trail. They responded well to voice commands.......when the guide shouted TROT.....they trotted and when she yelled CANTER......they all took off!! What fun!!
 

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Are they cheap at boarding places?
This question confuses me. Can you elaborate what you mean? Are you asking if they're cheap to board? The only time a price should be different on boarding is if the horse requires special care or if they are a draft (some places charge more to breed drafts because they eat more and they can be destructive...ask me how I know ;-) ). Other than that, most places charge the same whether it's an Arab, a QH, an Andalusian, or a TB.
 

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This question confuses me. Can you elaborate what you mean? Are you asking if they're cheap to board? The only time a price should be different on boarding is if the horse requires special care or if they are a draft (some places charge more to breed drafts because they eat more and they can be destructive...ask me how I know ;-) ). Other than that, most places charge the same whether it's an Arab, a QH, an Andalusian, or a TB.
We have different prices around here depending on horse size. Smaller horses are cheaper, larger horses more expensive. Every single barn does it like that. We don't have any draughts, but I assume they would be most expensive.

A Lipizzaner would fall into the cheaper category around here. A warmblood would be more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@DrafyAiresMum what Horsef said. Many boarding places change the prices depending on the horse. Exam. Fjord, 500 a month, QH, 400. (Not actually what would happen, just a random example)
 

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Huh. That's strange to me. The only time I've heard of the boarding price being different is if it's a mini (obviously cheaper because they eat less) or a draft (more expensive because they eat more). Even then, that's not always true. I pay $185 where I board, which is the same as the people who have the two little minis, and I have a 17hh 1600lbs draft cross. :shrug:
 

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I've not heard of any breed specific prices around here (within 2 hours of DFW area). What seems more common is that certain barns attract a type of rider who happens to have a type of horse. Least that is what I've seen. If that is how it works where you live that is interesting.

I don't know much about Lipizaners. I am a fan of the PRE Andalusians though. Sounds like you have some time before you go shopping. I can only recommend to learn as much about them as you can, specifically breeding and bloodlines.

My basic advice is to just be careful with what you buy. If it is anything like the PRE Andalusians it is an "Andalusian" in name only without all the correct papers and approved bloodlines from Spain. Basically like a grade Quarter Horse, but way more complicated. They are pretty serious about it and that affects resale and breeding heavily without that documentation.

I'd also recommend taking a serious look at the Azteca breed if you want the look and the action in what seems to be a really nice breed. They are Andalusian/Quarter Horse crosses that became an official breed in Mexico in the 1970s. Most have a very strong resemblance to PRE Andalusians, the more baroque type. From what I've seen they are big sturdy beautiful horses and seem calm to me. Most of the people I've seen with them are Charros, who are excellent riders and horseman for the most part. Gray is a common color with that breed, I love that stage where they go white with light dappling around 7-8 years old or so.
 
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