The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

Registered
Joined
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So ever since I even knew what eventing was I have been a huge fan of it. I have worked my tail off to be an Eventer which hasn't been easy since I'm 15 years old and living with a poor family. I haven't let that stop me though. I honestly can't see myself doing anything other than eventing with my life. I think about it 24/7 which can't posibbly be healthy. I have always been told I have big dreams and lots of determination, but, I think maybe my dreams have become too big????
I want to eventually compete in the Olympics, Rolex, and even the World Equestrian Games, plus everything in between.
Is this too unreasonable?
 

Registered
Joined
7,297 Posts
Firstly - accidents happen so you do need a backup plan. What will you do if you're injured badly enough in a fall that you can't ride anymore?

Secondly - NOBODY makes money out of riding, not unless they're so amazing that they can charge a fortune to train, ride, and compete other people's horses for them. Or a fortune for coaching. Or both. Most of the money is actually in sponsorships but you have to be seriously super amazing to make money out of sponsorships. An Olympic rider I briefly groomed for had a feed company sponsorship, a horse truck company sponsorship, and an arena and stable building company sponsorship, which decreased his operating costs a lot, but even as an Olympic medallist, he had to work 17 hours a day to maintain his property and his way of life. He was, and is, a wealthy man, but he had a LOT of money going into it. So, be prepared to have to work your butt off in another industry to make enough money to be able to work your butt off in the equestrian industry to make enough money to live.

And thirdly - how BAD do you want this? Because if you want it enough you will MAKE it happen no matter what people say.
 

Registered
Joined
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have thought about what I would do If I was injured. I have a plan for if I become paralyzed, go blind, loose limbs, etc.

I want to coach, train and run my own business. I do realize that I will have to work hard for it but I'll do whatever I have to to do what I love.

I want it so so so bad. You have no clue. I don't know how to explain how much I want this. All I know is I have never wanted anything more in my life.
 

Registered
Joined
7,297 Posts
You're too young to do it yet but have you thought about becoming a working pupil under a top rider? Some accept international students so you could basically have your pick from all the riders in the world, as long as you can scrape together enough money to fly to them. Many don't pay you money (just provide room and board), but the experience is invaluable and if you're willing to work your tail off for up to 17 hours a day then you'll go far.
 

Registered
Joined
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yes, Bill Hoos is a top rider just an hour away from where I live and it's on the way to my moms work. He pays $10 per hour for a working student! I am a big fan of him and am actually looking into becoming one of his working students.
 

Registered
Joined
7,297 Posts
That's actually really great, the Olympian I worked for didn't pay his riders until they'd been with him 6 months or more. After that point the money went up, but I didn't last that long before I got homesick and decided my horse was more important than my Olympic dreams - because I only had Monty for a limited amount of time, but I have my whole life to pursue Olympic gold.

I have considered going back.

It's incredibly hard work. You get all the un-fun jobs. Mucking stables, cleaning breezeways, making coffee for clients (actually I liked that part), fetching horses from pastures full of knee-deep mud. But it's so worth it for the riding. While I was there I was lucky enough to be offered the opportunity to ride an FEI dressage horse twice and he was absolutely incredible. I learned a ton, and in two lessons I had learned so much that when I came home my horse was suddenly working ten times better than he had been before I went. I really, desperately want to go back one day. It was absolutely amazing being over there.

I flew to the other side of Australia and I was only 17 (nearly 18), and I think had I not had a horse back home I'd have stayed.
 

Registered
Joined
14 Posts
I think it's great that you have such big dreams! And I think you know that achieving them will be the farthest thing from easy. Keeping yourself anchored in reality is important, and blue eyed pony made some great points about that.

But my biggest piece of advice for you is to hold on to your dreams. You're going to have a lot of people telling you they're not realistic, not possible. People will criticize you for daring to dream. Don't let them wear you down. Don't let the naysayers convince you to give up or to settle for less than what you want.

Good luck!
 

Registered
Joined
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thank you guys! I'm really excited about what's to come in my future! I'm just glad that the path I'm taking is the one I love. I have watched a lot of my loved ones ruin their lives because they didn't do what they loved and all of them wish they had.

I'm ready to do this and I know I can. And I will. Just look out for my name.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
16,046 Posts
Nothing is impossible!

Nowadays those that make it to the top of an equestrian tree usually have money behind them or grow up in the trade so to speak.

Any form of equestrian sports are expensive. It is no good relying on having one good horse, you need two or three with more coming through the grades.

Unless you have exceptional talent and an extremely generous trainer who will let you compete on good horses, chances are fairly slim.
 

Registered
Joined
3,077 Posts
So what are you going to do if you can't physically do it? What's your back up plan?

I'm all for dreams, but have a plan b
Posted via Mobile Device
 

Super Moderator
Joined
16,046 Posts
When you look at the odds of getting chosen for an international team they are astronomically long.

Olympics, five riders, four in the team and an individual, same for the WEG. When it comes to selection the panel are going to go for experience over someone 'new.'

Tirana Coleman one of the U.S. Olympic riders trained in the UK - that take a lot of money. Two of the other selected riders, Phillip Dutton and Boyd Martin each had two reserve horses. Look at the biographies of the team members and you will see that they have been competing from an early age, have money and luck behind them.

Unfortunately life is nothing like International Velvet!

A young girl, Mary Gordon Watson had a very good horse, Cornishman V. She was relatively inexperienced. When it came time to select the UK team, she was encouraged to lend the horse to more experienced roder, Richard Mead for the Mexico Olympics, later, at the Munich Olympics she rode him herself.

For all these International events you have to be a team player.
 

Registered
Joined
4,863 Posts
I think having big dreams is good. Aiming somewhere is good.

However, often the dream doesn't match the reality. Which is fine too. What you need to be cautious of is linking your dreams and sense of self. You are not your dreams, and failing to ache ice your dreams is not you failing. Just as achieving your dreams isn't going to perfect your life. Dreams are excellent things however don't put too much significance on them. The amount of times I have heard "I'll be happy when" etc is crazy! Be happy all the time and if something isn't making you happy then seriously reconsider it. Life isn't a party but you shouldn't be miserable.

The only reason I am saying this is that I have noticed it especially with horses. I'll be happy when I get a horse. I'll be happy once I can ride again. I just want to show and then I'll be happy. Or conversely I can't survive without my horse. Don't tie up your happiness with something external. So many people spend years slaving away under this delusion that one day everything will be magical better and they'll never have problems again. Enjoy the journey, enjoy the ride and if life takes you somewhere else consider it. A dream is a path somewhere, but there are many paths.
 

Registered
Joined
164 Posts
no dreams are too big, my mom has told me time and time again that I need to re think horseback riding that its too expensive and that I wont really go any where. I always tell her that I am going to try to the end to go for my dreams! I don't want to be 60 and regret that I didn't do what I loved when I was 21. I may be paying $800 a month for lessons, horse and other things but I know that when I die I cant take my money to my grave
 

Registered
Joined
17,293 Posts
Princess, usually the ones who make it to the upper echelons in the equestrian world come from wealth. They ride with the best trainers and have great horses. All have thousands of hours under their belts.
 

Registered
Joined
10 Posts
Wow, I have the same dream as you. Well, I suppose most riders do, but I have been dreaming about eventing in the Olympics since I was little. I'm 13 now, 14 in a couple of days. Nobody else in my family rides. I have no lessons, but my school has an equestrian team, we meet twice a week. The only jumping class is hunter hack, which I used to like until I decided I liked faster events. The coach of a nearby school lived in England when she was my age. She's absolutely amazing. I want to offer to help her out at her barn, cleaning stalls, grooming, maybe exercising her horses when she can't. She rode on the International circuit, she was so close to riding in the Olympics. She lost her horse before she could. Her biggest regret is that she quit jumping. She does showmanship and pleasure, no eventing. She taught me all I know about jumping, and when I told her how bad I wanted to compete in the Olympics, she didn't laugh like most people do when I tell them my dream. She asks, "Why do you want it so bad?" I replied, "To prove to myself that anything is possible, that I can do anything. I want to set an example, I want to show everything else that no matter what they can do anything, that no matter what, no dream is to big of a dream." There was a lot more than that that I said, but when I finished I looked at the coach, she was crying. I was too.
She says that I am going to have to work hard, so, so hard. She says that I need to find a good college on the east coast, find a barn to work at, ride as many horses as I can.
She also said that if I really want it, I'll get it.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top