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Hey there! I am a high myopic with degree of myopia -8.00D in both eyes. What extra precautions you take than a non-myopic individual when horse riding? (Since I am new to horse riding, I am always in a fear that I might fall down and something bad would happen to my retina/eye) Thanks!
 

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If it is a worry then sports googles might alleviate some of your fears. I really don't worry. Considering I've been told even rubbing my eyes can cause injury leading to permanent vision loss I figure I'd lose it doing something I enjoy. I have a severe degree of kerataconus along with poor vision and am legally blind at this point anyway. Doesn't stop me from riding.
 

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Hey there! I am a high myopic with degree of myopia -8.00D in both eyes. What extra precautions you take than a non-myopic individual when horse riding? (Since I am new to horse riding, I am always in a fear that I might fall down and something bad would happen to my retina/eye) Thanks!

I have significant nearsightedness in my right eye (last check was -5.50, and I'm due for a checkup). I don't really take any extra precautions - I have a spare pair of glasses, which I should probably take with me, but I also buy the extra sturdy kind with fancy thin polycarbonate lenses that don't make me feel lopsided. The hardest part for me is turns toward my right - the peripheral vision is so terrible that I have a hard time because I simply can't see until the visual field falls within my glasses. I also play hockey, and believe me, I know the feeling of being afraid something will happen to my eyes, or at least my "good" eye!


Forgive me if this is a rehash of whatever your eye doc has gone over with you, but anatomically, our visual processing center is in the back of the brain. Wearing a helmet, even if you fell right backward, your brain would be pretty safe, especially as a newer rider where you're (probably?) not doing anything especially wild. Very serious trauma like a skull fracture or a penetrating injury can damage that area, but again helmets are your friend here.



Risk of an injury directly to the eye, that can damage the eyeball or detach the retina, can be reduced by wearing prescription sport goggles. Personally, I have never tried them. A friend tried them for hockey and found that they fogged easily and weren't any better than his usual glasses, but some of the kids I've babysat for wear them for soccer and baseball and seem to like them. You can try them for relatively cheap from a website like zennioptical or somesuch, as long as you have your prescription.
 

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Welcome to my world!! I wear contacts, and since horses are my life, never would have thought about that....
 

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One of our members is a "eye care professional".
I'll send a "can you take a peek" message and see if they will participate in this discussion, their choice...
We have many members who are professionals in human and or animal issues in many specialty fields....
What they share is up to them always...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Hey there! I am a high myopic with degree of myopia -8.00D in both eyes. What extra precautions you take than a non-myopic individual when horse riding? (Since I am new to horse riding, I am always in a fear that I might fall down and something bad would happen to my retina/eye) Thanks!

Welcome OP! I am an optometrist myself so let me start by saying you should ask YOUR OPTOMETRIST these questions at your next eye exam so they can better answer them specifically, based on your individual ocular history.



But in general.....
Folks who have high myopia have a slightly increased risk of retinal detachment. This is because the length of the eyeball is longer than it should be, which causes the myopia, and also causes the retina to "stretch" to compensate for this longer eye length. It can make you more prone to having "thin spots" that can rip or tear. It doesn't mean you'll get one, but it does mean you should always go in for a check if you experience any signs or symptoms that could be a retinal detachment. Most commonly people will either notice some sort of black or gray floater that moves around in their vision. Or you could notice a "flashing" or "blinking" light in your vision. Or both. Or you may notice a dark/gray area of your vision that does not move and is always present. There can be many different presentations but it's important to know that you will NOT experience pain with a retinal tear, hole, or detachment. The retina itself does not have pain receptors so therefore it cannot feel pain. But it does transmit a light signal, and that's why it can convey the above signs/symptoms when there is a problem with the retina.



So if we relate that to horseback riding, of course there is risk of falling off your horse as well as being hit by your horse (ex: if they swing their head around and hit you in the head). Any time you have blunt force trauma to the head, whether it is a fall or a hit, it is a very good idea to call your optometrist especially if you sustained the impact NEAR THE EYE. Most optometrists are comfortable dealing with urgent situations like this and are qualified to examine the inside of the eye for any possible rips or tears or detachments that will need a referral for surgical repair. Anyone, high myope or not, should do this. But especially moreso if you are a high myope with an already increased risk of retinal detachment.


If a hole or tear is present, it has the potential to develop into a detachment. The longer the retina is detached, and more permanent the damage becomes. The retina is very sensitive and complex cells - just like brain cells - and they can never be put back together quite the same way, once they are ripped apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to ya all for the answers!

I think that wearing protective wear and getting regular examinations will be all good for me to keep riding.

Thanks to ya all again for boosting my confidence 😃
 

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Thank-you beau for joining the discussion and adding some professional explanation and advice we all can and should take to heart...


Our eyesight is a gift given only once perfectly...
Man can fix or assist it, but never return to what was first created.
hlg..
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Oh I so wish that were true but not all of us received the gift of perfect eyesight. I can just say because I don't know what I am missing I don't miss it so probably better off.
 

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Me too QtrBel....
I've worn glasses since 6th grade...
It was discovered a past injury done and my sight affected.
So far, glasses can work magic...
:runninghorse2:...
 

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I've gone off on a thread jack. Contacts and glasses - one mostly shapes - the other mostly corrects. Can't fix no 3'd vision though..... I'm a reverse Flat Stanley.


I used to joke about the apple never being on the table or the bee in the hive, flag on the pole, all of those vision tests that they gave at the DMV. Most don't get it because they don't realize stereoscopic vision is the norm and they'll never not see the apple on the table.
 

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Thank-you beau for joining the discussion and adding some professional explanation and advice we all can and should take to heart...

Our eyesight is a gift given only once perfectly...
Man can fix or assist it, but never return to what was first created.

No problem. I much, much prefer people to be "safe than sorry". I often have patients apologizing to me for urgent visits and I"m just like "Don't apologize!!!" I would much rather see someone and be able to tell them all is well. Rather than someone waiting a couple weeks before they come in .... and then it's too late. And that happens more than it should.


Just like horses with eye issues, never mess around! While healthcare is improving every day, there are STILL things that we just cannot fix once the damage is done.



I've gone off on a thread jack. Contacts and glasses - one mostly shapes - the other mostly corrects. Can't fix no 3'd vision though..... I'm a reverse Flat Stanley.

I used to joke about the apple never being on the table or the bee in the hive, flag on the pole, all of those vision tests that they gave at the DMV. Most don't get it because they don't realize stereoscopic vision is the norm and they'll never not see the apple on the table.

Right - once you've missed the window to develop stereopsis, you don't get that chance back. Hence why we recommend first eye exams to be at the age of 6 months old. Yes, very early! But that also allows us to catch issues BEFORE they become an issue. The vast majority of things like that are preventable with early treatment or therapy.
 

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I was under the care of one of the best in New Orleans at that point in time. My parents were told I'd be completely blind by the time I hit school. By that time they were able to slow the progression though and I still have some vision and while not correctable to 20/20 it is somewhat correctable.
 
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