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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!
I am not so knowledgeable about horses and I was wondering if there was such a thing as a slow horse/pony? I love horses and used to ride but I am not a fan of going fast. Are there horses out there who would be happy to just walk/trot and nothing else?
Thank you for reading, please let me know the answer!! <3
 

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Definitely! Often these are older horses who have worked in lesson programs because their quiet and agreeable demeanor makes them suitable for people who are more comfortable with a slower pace as they learn about balance and the mechanics of riding. I'd recommend checking out riding schools in your area that offer adult beginner lessons. Even better if they are able to offer you lessons where you are hacking out- then your walk/trot rides allow you to cover the countryside and take in the scenery while you're getting comfortable in the saddle. If you talk to potential riding schools, I'd just stress your interest in having a safe experience. Many places will allow you to visit if you schedule ahead of time just to observe a lesson or two- that will allow you to see how the horses behave with students on them.
 

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Definitely! You might have some luck talking to people making ranch horses. If they are lazy they are often sold, because they just aren’t great for work. Yet, lazy is always someone’s dream horse! I am sure that most horses could land in the hands of someone they are just made for.
 

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Horses that are cold-blooded, well-trained, old, or laid back tend to be slower than hot-blooded, green, young, or energetic horses.

One thing to keep in mind is that gait does not necessarily equate to speed. I ride a gaited horse who can naturally walk at the same speed as the trot of a non-gaited horse. One pony's canter may be the same speed as the trot of a horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Definitely! Often these are older horses who have worked in lesson programs because their quiet and agreeable demeanor makes them suitable for people who are more comfortable with a slower pace as they learn about balance and the mechanics of riding. I'd recommend checking out riding schools in your area that offer adult beginner lessons. Even better if they are able to offer you lessons where you are hacking out- then your walk/trot rides allow you to cover the countryside and take in the scenery while you're getting comfortable in the saddle. If you talk to potential riding schools, I'd just stress your interest in having a safe experience. Many places will allow you to visit if you schedule ahead of time just to observe a lesson or two- that will allow you to see how the horses behave with students on them.
Thank you so much! I will check out some schools near me
 

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Like BoJack said above it just depends on the horse.

There are some horses that can lope all day in the shade of a tree. Meaning, you get the motion, but not a lot of speed.

Pleasure horses are bred to be very slow legged.

It all depends on what you want in a horse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Definitely! You might have some luck talking to people making ranch horses. If they are lazy they are often sold, because they just aren’t great for work. Yet, lazy is always someone’s dream horse! I am sure that most horses could land in the hands of someone they are just made for.
Thank you so much! I will look into that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Horses that are cold-blooded, well-trained, old, or laid back tend to be slower than hot-blooded, green, young, or energetic horses.

One thing to keep in mind is that gait does not necessarily equate to speed. I ride a gaited horse who can naturally walk at the same speed as the trot of a non-gaited horse. One pony's canter may be the same speed as the trot of a horse.
I will keep that in mind, thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Like BoJack said above it just depends on the horse.

There are some horses that can lope all day in the shade of a tree. Meaning, you get the motion, but not a lot of speed.

Pleasure horses are bred to be very slow legged.

It all depends on what you want in a horse.
Thank you! I will remember that
 

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A lot of horses that are older can no longer canter comfortably and would really just as soon not canter. And a lot of horses (at least at my barn) that are "green" don't like to canter because they can't do it well with a human on top. If you want to take lessons and only want to walk and trot, it should be easy to find a place that can accommodate you.

Having said that, even a ploddy, ancient pony sometimes may have moments where they are either feeling really good, or something spooks them, and they take off at a canter. I would say, even if you only intend to walk and trot, do try cantering a few times so you are at least ready if it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A lot of horses that are older can no longer canter comfortably and would really just as soon not canter. And a lot of horses (at least at my barn) that are "green" don't like to canter because they can't do it well with a human on top. If you want to take lessons and only want to walk and trot, it should be easy to find a place that can accommodate you.

Having said that, even a ploddy, ancient pony sometimes may have moments where they are either feeling really good, or something spooks them, and they take off at a canter. I would say, even if you only intend to walk and trot, do try cantering a few times so you are at least ready if it happens.
That is a good point, thank you!
 

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I have to say, while all breeds have their slow horses (and age is definitely a factor when searching for a slow horse, the older s/he is, usually the slower too), I feel that Haflingers are generally a pretty laidback, slow breed. I've grown up around 2 Haffies, and ridden an additional one for lessons long ago, and throughout all three lives, they were lazy plodders.
 

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Look for ads that say “more whoa than go.” If you are on fb, which I am not, but when I was there were horse for sale type pages. Sometimes people put up “in search of” ads, and many horses were shown to them. If you put up an ad for a “more whoa than go” solid using horse, you might find something.

I agree with others that there is a more likely tendency of that nature in cold blooded horses. A haflinger or fjord (although ours is ambitious enough), a half draft… these seem more likely to meet your needs. That said, those horses are also capable of being ambitious hot horses, depending on the individual. There are lots of mustangs who, broke of course, end up with that type of mentality. Pleasure horses tend to be bred and trained towards slowness.
 
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As other people mentioned above, yes there are. You might even find a horse which has a very slow comfortable canter that is barely noticeable. I rode one such mare in riding school and I could even canter bareback despite not being a very good rider. She had a great personality, she was very big and helped many tiny kids learn how to ride. It was amazing to see this big beast behaving perfectly for a tiny six year old novice while everyone else around them was trying to wrangle ponies into submission and usually failing miserably. Lovely mare, I miss her a lot (she passed peacefully due to old age)
 

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Like everyone's said before: yes there are slow horses! They're usually lovely lesson horses that teach tiny kids, but they sure do appreciate an experienced and confident adult getting on them, too. Even if it's not for anything complicated. After all, that's how they got so chill in the first place! An experienced rider letting them know that humans are friends! From my experience, the larger drafts tend to be the most chill, ironically. One of the best lesson horses to ever come through our barn was a ginormous, fluffy draft gelding who was in no rush to get anywhere, ever <3
 

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There are 2 meanings of slow. One it your typical plodder that requires a boot to even think about speeding up. These horses are horrible. But the other type just has a really slow smooth stride. This is the type you want although unfortunately they are all to rare
 

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Hi everyone!
I am not so knowledgeable about horses and I was wondering if there was such a thing as a slow horse/pony? I love horses and used to ride but I am not a fan of going fast. Are there horses out there who would be happy to just walk/trot and nothing else?
Thank you for reading, please let me know the answer!! <3
yes! I’ve ridden fast horses, but a large amount of lesson horses, especially beginner ones, are slow! It’s common for some horses to have more woah than go.
 

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I am not so knowledgeable about horses and I was wondering if there was such a thing as a slow horse/pony? I love horses and used to ride but I am not a fan of going fast. Are there horses out there who would be happy to just walk/trot and nothing else?
Horses are like humans. There are many different personalities. So yes, there are horses who do not have any desire to go fast, and won't unless you ask.

I've had several in my life that were perfectly happy going along at a nice walk or trot. One was a lovely 2-year-old. Sweet as can be. She went faster if I asked. But was perfectly happy at slower gaits.

So while there can be the stereotype of an older been-there-done-that arthritis old horse, there are younger horses out there too who just prefer to have a slower pace. It just depends on their personality.

A paint gelding my mom used to have (Geronimo) was like that. Didn't have a desire to go faster than a walk. Would if you asked, but just liked to walk.

Heck, my beloved Shotgun was like that. He could sit all winter, you get on him on a gusty windy day for the first time in the spring, and he'd walk off on a loose rein with his head down like he'd been ridden the day before. Was a wonder to me that he really ended up excelling in the barrel racing pen, because he really preferred to be the laid back kind. Of course, he's retired to the easy life at the age of 10 and all he's got to do is go on a walking trail ride a couple times a month. Perfect second career for him.

And then two of my current string can wait until you ask them to lope, LOL. Dexter and Lilly are always ready to GO! at a moment's notice. They are happiest to cover some ground.
 
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My wife had just such a slow horse, a TWH mare. If you quit kicking she quit moving. She'd much rather walk than run and to get her into a running walk took quite a bit of effort. Even in a large group trail ride when most of the group moved out she was content to walk and let the group leave her behind. I described this horse as having to constantly ride the gas pedal. Even this horse was too much for my wife so she has moved on to a perfect home with an anxious rider who likes to ride in parades. My own horse is just the opposite; if allowed to do his own thing he will run fast. I describe this horse as having to constantly ride the brake pedal. They are out there but horses like the TWH mare I described are relatively rare and highly sought after. Most horses fall somewhere in between.
 
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