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Discussion Starter #1
This is a horse at the barn I ride at.
I was up there just hanging out with the horses when I noticed these hooves don't look right...

I fell like the toes are too long on the front ones


Here are the hind hooves



Sorry abot the bad quality...it was a phone camera...
 

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ohhh, yikes!

Yes, something is definitely wrong with those hooves! I would never ride a horse who had hooves like this, for the horses sake and comfort.

bad hoof care just makes me sad and angry :(

if I had just got this horse, or could fix what was wrong, I would take the hind shoes off and let the back hooves reform and grow back correctly (too short and wide!)

and obviously cut the fronts back ( it would take a while for it to look like a normal hoof though) Glad you noticed, and hopefully you can do something about this. Almost %99 percent of the time, people won't have your advice, and are too proud to listen......especially when it comes to animals :(

hope this comes to someones attention and gets fixed!
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I will try to talk to my trainer...but I'm only 14 so I'm afraid she wouldn't listen.
Thank you for answering.
 

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The horse has foundered in the front. He needs re rehabilitative trimming, as live sole allows and frog support
The left hind in particular has heels too high, also most likely due to some laminitic effects, with taht coffin bone set on it's nose, most likely
You can't just trim them into correct parameters, but rather have to enable a correct tight white line to grow down again
 

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I will try to talk to my trainer...but I'm only 14 so I'm afraid she wouldn't listen.
Thank you for answering.
I understand about the age thing. I'm 15, and if you don't put up a tough, smart, knowledgeable front, people will just trample and run over you. Especially in the horse world. research on Founder, Laminitis, and any other hoof articles you can get your hands on. If you ask her with confidence and knowledge, she just might listen.

Hopefully you can contact the owner of the horse as well, Trainers can be defensive, or back off, due to keeping customers, and not wanting to start anything.

Glad you reached out and asked, you might be the only person that will try help to fix this problem. Good luck!
 
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It also depends on how the barn is run....if there are many horses with different owners, does the barn manager or trainer have a farrier coming regularly to trim all or some of the horses? Can't you just ask whether this horse can get trimmed with the others? "Isn't (.....horse's name) due for a trim?" without being confrontational.......it's worth a try.....
 

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Those hooves are definitely not right.

I noticed OP is located in Slovenia. I wonder if the location has anything to do with it? I'll preface my following sentence by saying I don't know anything about Slovenia. I do know that there are parts of the world where things that seem absolutely barbaric to us in terms of horse care are totally normal there. I wonder if that could possibly be the case here. If such things are commonplace where OP is, the owner is far more likely not to listen to them, and if they do listen, I wonder if they have access to people who have the right knowledge to deal with this problem, as the horse definitely looks to have foundered.
 

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Good for you for noticing this OP! Yes, the horse has obviously & seriously/chronically foundered. That he has shoes, set so far forward, shows the farrier is not knowledgeable about hoof health & function. **I am very reticent to make judgements about farriery from a few pics, but in this case...

**NB just looked again, in the close up fore, looked like a toe clip but now not so sure he's shod in front. He still needs toes dealt with seriously though.

I would not ride a horse in that state.

If you're going to bring it up with the owner, I'd be very cautious of how you do. Esp if you don't know better, only that they're 'not right', esp if the owner feels they're doing the best for the pony because they are also ignorant about it & trust the 'professional' farrier, they could just take offense, fob you off & do nothing.

I'd start educating yourself about hoof function & health, & treating 'founder/laminitis'. You will find some good links to start you off in the thread link in my signature below. Then you can speak from a more knowledgeable position. I'd probably say something like 'I've been learning they now have some effective ways to actually fix foundered feet like his & thought you might be interested in this info too'. Maybe present them with some alternatives for managing/treating hooves. And have some info ready for them.

At the end of the day, if it's not your horse, you can't MAKE them do anything, and the more confrontational or 'know it all'... or ignorant you seem, the more likely someone won't listen, will take offense. But presented right, you just might get them thinking & learning(because it's likely that THEY don't know better either, may be trusting advice of some unknowledgeable 'expert'), and will then be able to do better for their horse.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There are 6 geldings, all icelandics. They all have the same owner, but I don't see him very often. There are abou 4 regular trainers there, so I could talk to any of them.
All the horses have the same farrier, but they don't all get worked on at the same time. And they all have shoes on all 4 hooves at all times.
I will take more pictures of Hakon (the horse in the above pictures) and I will take pictures of the other horses too. When I was there there was only 1 other horse and it looked like his hooves were ok, or at least better.
I do not think Slovenia is a place like what you describe horseluvr...
I love the idea of educating myself. I am pretty shure my trainer would listen if I knew something about it.
This horse is not being ridden right now, because he had a tooth infection and they had to remove most of his front teeth. They don't want to shove a bit into his painfull mouth. But they are planning on having him work again in a couple of weeks.
Thank you for all you're sugestions.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
More pics:

Hakon:
Front hooves








The stuff that looks black and goey is just wet dirt (I didn't even notice it until I looked at the pic, it looks normal in real life).


Back hooves:








He stands normaly:


And this is where he is (concrete) I am not shure why.




Other horses (not very good, because they were on pasture)







 

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Discussion Starter #13
Oh I should also add, there was nobody there today (it's the horses day off) but I will be there on saturday again and so will my trainer. Even if I don't know much about laminitis at that point I will still bring it up, because it is possible she is just not aware of his hooves.
It may be hard for me to learn much about laminitis because I have to get a lot of grades (6) at school by the 8th of June.
 

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Well at least you know enough not to use that farrier if you have/get a horse! Yeah, you see some terrible egs, and it may or may not be necessary to 'bite your tongue' & say nothing. If you know little too, it's more likely to be taken badly... tho often it is anyway! So... you can't fix the world, so choose your 'battles' carefully!

But yeah, if you care about horses it is very difficult to 'turn a blind eye', and I don't personally feel it is right either - if no one will speak up for a horse/practice... As you say, the owner may just be ignorant(I believe that's the case generally with negligence, not that they knowingly allow it), and how can anyone ever learn better if they don't get told that they don't know??

So... of the horses pictured, yes, I'd be concerned enough to comment on the foundered pony at least, and I do appreciate lack of time etc, but I would endeavor to learn a bit about it before bringing it up. lamenessprevention.org & hoofrehab.com are 2 good sources to start with... you can really get 'deep' with the heap of info there, but you should get a better idea of the basic principles without spending too much time.

The other factor is that it's very possible(common in so many areas) that there are few if any really knowledgeable farriers, and this one may be the best of a bad bunch or such. Also consider the 'politics' of that & careful not to 'burn your bridges'...

Best wishes for you & those horses, that it goes well.
 

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OK, speaking of spending too much time... couldn't help myself...

For your further info, I've drawn on some of your pics. **This is as a VERY ROUGH idea for you - can't really be more precise just from those pics. The green lines indicate roughly where the heels & toes 'should' be. In dealing with chronically deformed feet, it is also often not possible just to lop off the excess back to 'ideal' in one fell swoop, it would take time with regular good trimming to 'bring them back'.

The sole shot, which has the lines indicating how far back the heel & toe 'should'(roughly) be... you will find info on lamenessprevention.org as to how/why to work that out.
 

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Unfortunately, this horse, unless someone makes drastic changes, will hurt for the rest of it's life. Sorry, there is nothing, you as a person, can do. Just be kind to the horse.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you, especialy loosie.
I come back from school tiday at a little after 1pm and am going to be at the barn at 4, which gives me about 2,5h, which should be enough time to read about founder.
 
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