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I’m just working on assembling a first aid kit for my new horse before he comes home, and I was curious what things you guys like to have in yours
 

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My "kit" has grown over the years and with each ailment presented...
But basics....

Telephone numbers of several vets to reach in case you need them ASAP
Sterile gauze pads, 3"x 3" & 4" x 4"
Some sort of antiseptic ointment
A wound drying powder {powder or spray}
Scissor, blunt and pointed
Tweezers
Vet wrap
Cling wrap
Saran wrap
Duct tape, a roll of it.
Thermometer and learn how to read it if not digital
Fly spray...amazing how pesky those buggars are when a injury occurs.
Aspirin/Tylenol for me and band-aids.

I have a lot more than this but these are basics immediately come to mind...
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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Disinfectant

Adding on to these basics I also keep a bottle of betadine for cleaning wounds and multiple rags for stopping bleeding before wrapping and such

My "kit" has grown over the years and with each ailment presented...
But basics....

Telephone numbers of several vets to reach in case you need them ASAP
Sterile gauze pads, 3"x 3" & 4" x 4"
Some sort of antiseptic ointment
A wound drying powder {powder or spray}
Scissor, blunt and pointed
Tweezers
Vet wrap
Cling wrap
Saran wrap
Duct tape, a roll of it.
Thermometer and learn how to read it if not digital
Fly spray...amazing how pesky those buggars are when a injury occurs.
Aspirin/Tylenol for me and band-aids.

I have a lot more than this but these are basics immediately come to mind...
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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I like to keep a tube of Banamine on hand. It does expire eventually so it will be need to be replaced and kept up-to-date, but in the event you need Banamine NOW (such as a colicing horse) and it's after hours, you want to have one on hand.

Other medications usually aren't as emergency and I can pick up in town or get from the vet.

I've had way too many horse injuries in the past so I have a very good supply of:
-vet wrap
-cotton wrap
-quilted padding
-elasticon (so awesome for keeping leg bandages up)
-duct tape (also good for keeping leg bandages up)
-silver sulfadiazine wound ointment
-prouds off wound ointment
-Betadine
-sharp regular scissors and bandaging scissors
-razor blade (good for cutting bandage supplies .... or cleaning up tissue around a wound)
-gauze pad
-maxi pads or diapers (work great for large wounds)
-thermometer
-empty large syringes (if I need to force-feed a powder anti-biotic, or something of that nature for a picky eater)
-paper towels
 

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I’m just working on assembling a first aid kit for my new horse before he comes home, and I was curious what things you guys like to have in yours
You you asking as to what supplies to just have on hand, at home, or a first aid kit to take trail riding?
 

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just a note, far as Banamine and colic, which I think, needs to be empathized.
I don't keep it on hand for colic, as the equine vet I use, plus some others, do not want ahorse treated with apain reliever until the type of colic is diagnosed
Others will give the nod to a single does of Banamine, which works well for gas colic.
However, giving repeat doses can hide the fact that an impaction colic is becoming worse, going from one that is medically treatable to one that becomes a surgical one.
I do keep some castor oil on hand for impaction colic, and if that does not resolve it, the horse gets tubed by the vet.
Just did not wish to have someone relatively new to horses, to think that Banamine cures colic

A Cautionary Note About Banamine and Colic
 

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Another source:

'Resist the Temptation to Medicate
It is often tempting to give a colicky horse a dose of flunixin meglumine (Banamine) or phenylbutazone paste (bute). This is not necessarily a good idea without first conferring with your vet, for many reasons:

Oral medication is poorly absorbed from the intestines in a horse with compromised gut motility, as is often the case with colic. Even under normal circumstances, oral medications require several hours to be absorbed and begin working. An oral dose is less likely to help with immediate colic pain, and once given, it interferes with both a veterinarian’s assessment and the ability to administer this medication intravenously to provide immediate pain relief.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) may significantly mask symptoms of a surgical problem, thereby delaying appropriate treatment. These medications can create kidney function problems and/or gastric ulcers in a dehydrated horse.

Injectable flunixin meglumine given intramuscularly has been known to create Clostridia infection within the muscles, causing life-threatening consequences. In addition, many horse owners are unaware that the label dose of flunixin meglumine is twice the amount that should be given to a colicky horse—such a large dose is able to mask a surgical condition for as much as half a day. This could delay appropriate medical intervention and reduce the horse’s chances for survival.

The Truth about Colic
 

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It's still good to have oral Banamine on hand. But also call your vet immediately. If he says to give Banamine you can go ahead and not wait for him. It really does depend on the type of colic. Also the vet will use diagnostic techniques that aren't masked by Banamine. It is true however that a very novice horse owner might be fooled into thinking a serious colic was resolved when it wasn't.
 

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One thing I really like to have is a bottle of spray saline/wound wash. It can really help you see how deep a wound is or if some little piece of matter is skin or dirt, etc. Since it's colorless it is better than betadine for visualizing. It's less forceful and easier to get close to the wound than a hose.
 

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I have most of what others have stated - and it's sort of funny, but my horse first-aid kit is usually better stocked than my people kit. I don't know how many times I've used the horse's kit to patch myself up!
 

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just a note, far as Banamine and colic, which I think, needs to be empathized.
Yes, I should clarify in my post that the banamine is only going to be given per the vet's instructions.
 
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I have most of what others have stated - and it's sort of funny, but my horse first-aid kit is usually better stocked than my people kit. I don't know how many times I've used the horse's kit to patch myself up!
Yes, I have gone out to the barn and fetched some first aid stuff from my horse supplies, but have also done the reverse in an emergency= like used human eye drop antibiotics on a horse

I even took a horse to a Hospital emerg department once.

Kinda a funny story. Way back when, all we had were covered stock racks to haul a horse. We loaded a mare, going for breeding, quite a distance away, in the dark. Of course, we had to dot hat by backing against a dirt pile, and on the way in, she had caught a back leg somewhere.

I did not think it was serious, so we set off. When we stopped in Red Deer for coffee,I noticed the wound was bleeding quite a bit, and no, I did not have any emergency supplies with me. Learned a lesson for the future! Of course, easy to keep stuff in a tack compartment of a horse trailer.

Anyway, it was early in the morning with no vet clinics open, thus I told hubby to drive tot he Red Deer hospital. I walked into emerg, and asked, as a professional courtesy, if they would give me some dis disinfectant and bandaging material for an injured friend out in the parking lot.

I was asked as to why I did not just bring the patient in. When I told them it was a horse, they rolled eyes, gave me the supplies and told me to just go!
 

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One thing I really like to have is a bottle of spray saline/wound wash. It can really help you see how deep a wound is or if some little piece of matter is skin or dirt, etc. Since it's colorless it is better than betadine for visualizing. It's less forceful and easier to get close to the wound than a hose.
I keep several cans/bottles of this. Also the feminine pads. Baking powder. Scissors in two or three different sizes, peroxide, clean cotton rags - usually old dish towels. Pliers. Clean plastic bucket. Horse/cow sized sterile syringes (we've not needed those yet except to drain a cyst on my own wrist. That's also what the Crown and Coke are for in the beer fridge in the tack room).

We've been fortunate so far. Most of our horse 'wounds' are either from abscesses caused by thorns in the necks, barbed wire (we have cattle as well, so horse wire fences are not an option. Cows will just go right through the strands) or something getting jabbed into a hoof - that's when the pliers come out.

Sarge came to us covered in a lot of thick, old scabs from bites and kicks, so I added coconut oil and vitamin e oil to the tack room. The coconut oil has an anti-bacterial property to it, and its great for healing skin (same with the vitamin e oil).

Also Triple Antibiotic ointment, but I haven't really noticed it helping heal wounds any faster and if I'm understanding how horse wounds heal, debridement of larger wounds (gently washing the wound with clean, lukewarm water until its clean and bleeds freely) is far more helpful.
 
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Toddler sized diapers are nice to have, too. Not the fancy shaped ones, but the ones that can be pulled into a big square. They're non-stick, and the taped ends come in handy. They also work well as shipping boots!

Years ago, one of our horses got a chain wrapped around her gaskin and really tore it up. The vet gave me a gallon tub of betadine paste and told me to wash it out daily with clean, cool water, then lathered in the betadine and bandaged to keep the flies out of it. Yeah. How do you wrap a horse's leg from the hock to the stifle? Diapers. And stat-wrap. Lots of stat wrap!
 

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I forgot until today, when B, the young lady that helps me out with our horses called me in a panic with an injured horse of her own... Draw it Out.

I was given one of these by someone to see if its a product we want to sell through the tack shop. I sent it with B this evening - told her to use what she needed and bring back what she didn't use. It comes in much smaller sizes, which are less expensive.

https://www.amazon.com/128oz-Draw-It-Out-Concentrate/dp/B017N5UFVI/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1516405586&sr=8-13&keywords=Draw+it+out

Did I mention Vetricyn? If not, get some. Its good stuff.
 
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