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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to start a thread where everyone could post their barefoot trims, and ask for help. I figured if lots of people were doing a barefoot trim themselves they could post pics if they had questions and we could all learn together. If there are enough people doing barefoot trims it would make a nice resource to have a sub-forum for barefoot trims. Or maybe even just use this post and make it a sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Left front

I used the trim from this page Barefoot for Soundness
I've ordered pete rameys dvd's under the horse. This is my first full trim myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Right Rear

After looking at all these pics I can see things a bit easier. When I lower the heels how low should I bring em? A couple rasp widths higher than the sole right where the heel is? I really didn't bring em down much on this trim. I just rasped all the hooves heels a little bit. Not much at all. I'll definately feel more comfortable on the next trim after watching some dvd's over and again. I was also thinking of finding some cadaver hooves to practice with. "I hope people don't frown on that. But it would be good practice."
 

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I'm not sure I like this idea... Kind of scares me. There are just sooo many things to take into consideration and so many different points of view and sooo many different horses and feet and environments and feed and... you get the idea. There is a whole "sub-culture" just for trimming; a whole other language and a whole other education. I compare it to posting a "vet how-to" thread. Just too involved.

There are lots and lots of great barefoot sites on the internet. For people that seriously want to learn, there is a lot more reading, talking, clinics and hands on to do then what can be covered in this forum. I'd hate for someone to think they are getting qualified advice, run with it and end up with a lame horse.

I'm sure everyone's intentions would be good, but not everyone will proviso their comments with, "Keep in mind, I'm not a qualified practictioner..."
 

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Argh! Just wrote an indepth reply & had it disappear into cyberspace! Very basically....

You'll get a heap out of Pete's DVDs and yes, I think visiting a knackery for some cadaver hooves is a great idea. Allows you to practice, experiment & compare without hurting anyone! If you can, get the knackery guys to use their saw to halve some of the hooves(**** hard to do by hand!), so you can see the coffin bone, hoof capsule, etc in profile.

It appears from the cracks, ridges, etc, that diet/nutrition are or were a prob. safergrass.org is one site that springs to mind re feeding lami prone horses, and FeedXL.com is a fantastic(& very affordable) service/program that I personally subscribe to, which will help you analyse & work out correct nutrition for him. On that note, I'm not sure if they're functioning properly for other countries besides Australia yet(they're new) but if not, I'm sure there are other similar programs or services around.

The front half of his feet are excellent - the walls have been rolled/relieved right back to the damaged laminae which will allow them a chance to grow down strongly. You need to continue that back further to the rear of the quarters tho, instead of to where the overgrown bars & heels meet.

His bars need to come down to near sole level pretty desperately IMO. You're right that his heels are also too long too, but also right to take this gradually. Just lower them bit by bit & play it by ear. If at some point it makes him more sensitive on rough/hard ground on his weak heels, allow them to stay a tad longer than that until his digital cushions strengthen. Frog support pads or 'Sole Guard' or such would help in the meantime.

Lateral balance is hard to assess from these pix, but it does seem that the outsides of his rears at least are a little longer.

Sorry I no longer have time for more detail now.
 

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I'm not sure I like this idea... Kind of scares me. There are just sooo many things to take into consideration and so many different points of view and sooo many different horses and feet and environments and feed and... you get the idea. There is a whole "sub-culture" just for trimming; a whole other language and a whole other education. I compare it to posting a "vet how-to" thread. Just too involved.

There are lots and lots of great barefoot sites on the internet. For people that seriously want to learn, there is a lot more reading, talking, clinics and hands on to do then what can be covered in this forum. I'd hate for someone to think they are getting qualified advice, run with it and end up with a lame horse.

I'm sure everyone's intentions would be good, but not everyone will proviso their comments with, "Keep in mind, I'm not a qualified practictioner..."
Agree thoroughly with the above, and in my first indepth reply I elaborated on the idea of doing your own research, making your own decisions & not just taking anyone's words for it. So saying, given other posts & info on the situation, I'm confident in replying how I have for this situation. However, that definitely doesn't mean I'd advocate the same treatment for a different horse/situation either.
 

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Sorry, Totalfreedom, I responded only to the first post you made and not your pics.

I also say that the bars are overgrown and heels are too long. Also, I would rasp down the sides of the heels -- still some flaring there.

If you can get cadaver hooves, go for it. The ones that I have seen / used have been in terrible shape and it is interesting to see how much can be done in one trim in really bad situation. Also, take pics of your trims to self-critique.

Even when doing your own horse, you have already seen how much of a difference pictures make. For some reason, it's easier to see some of the things in 2D after the fact. Plus you can draw all over it!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I took the rasp out this morning before putting on his boots and lowered the heels and I also rolled the edge all the way to the heel. Not a whole lot. Just enough so that I can take it slow. I took the heel height on the fronts down a bit though cus they were very tall. The hinds were ok so I just lightly rasped em.

I'm kinda wishing I would of taken some pics of his hooves when I first brought him home. It's neat to see the trim going to work. His hooves were very flat and had overgrown bars all the way to the tip of the frog. All I did was after the farrier came out the first time, was two weeks later took out the rasp and kinda touched things up. Lowered the heels, rolled the edge. But I didn't take hardly anything off. I've never touched the sole or the bars. And it's neat to see those overgrown bars turn to flaky/chalky dead sole and just exfoliate off of the sole. Also the soles are beginning to become concave. At least on the fronts. The backs are still fairly flat.

I really like the idea of taking pictures. It's amazing how much it helps me to be able to look at the hooves in a picture. I think before my next trimming I'm gonna take before pictures, "and I'll post em here", and then I can have a really good sense of what I need to do to each hoof. It'll help me have a plan of action and what to do. I really am amazed at the power of the pictures to help me see what's going on, I just keep coming back here to look at the pics.
 

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I took these pictures two days ago, around evening time after he had been wearing his hoof boots all day. "I only leave the boots on from morning chores till evening before dark." And yesterday and today I've left em off him. I've been treating thrush so I thought it may be good to leave the boots off for a few days.?

Anyhow here's the pictres after lowering the heels and rolling the wall up to the heel. The first two are the RF and the second two pics are the LF.

I also wanted to say that while I was picking his hooves this morning to spray on some ACV to treat the thrush, "I just spray every hoof", I was noticing that his rear hooves are beginning to concave. That put a smile on my face. All four of his hooves when I brought him home were FLAT.
 

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Sorry, Totalfreedom, I responded only to the first post you made and not your pics.

I also say that the bars are overgrown and heels are too long. Also, I would rasp down the sides of the heels -- still some flaring there.

!
I agree. Those are not good examples of a good trim. The heals need to be taken way down.

Totalfreedom I just saw your latest pictures and the bars are still not trimmed right.
 

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How is he walking? Is he landing heel first? Does he seem comfortable with the trim? All important observations.

I would advise shoving some Triple antibiotic/foot fungus ointment up that heel crack. ;)
 

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Agree with AppyT's comments. It is unclear to me from just these latest pics, whether or how much the heels may need to be brought down, but this also depends on how comfortable or otherwise he is. Obviously, if he needs boots just for living, he's still quite uncomfortable & frogs are still thrushy, so this indicates his heels *may* be best left longer for now. However, being underslung, I'd probably bevel them slightly, to bring the bearing surface further back.

In the latest pics, it seems that the heels are reasonably low, but still underslung. The bars are still massively overgrown. I think taking them down to near sole level is important, and will also afford you a better idea about the heels & quarters. It seems atm, you're 'scooping the quarters only as far back as where the overgrown heel & bar material join, which appears perhaps up to an inch in front of where they should be. Correcting that should address the quarter flares.

I'd be getting serious about the thrush. I don't like using heavy duty stuff on thrush *as a rule*, as it kills healthy tissue too, but IME in hooves such as this, ACV doesn't cut it. I would be using iodine or such, or 'Pete's Goo' for a time or few to begin with, before reverting back to ACV to keep it at bay.
 

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Right now, I think I'd knock some of that bar off, or he's apt to bruise under there. That might be more painful than the thrush...

Anyhoo, if you get the bars knocked down some, where they aren't so laid over, and since this is your own horse that you can trim anytime you please, I'd just start with getting the bars in check, give it a few days to see if that helps the comfort before lowering the heels. If you knock off the bars, and take the heels back too much, the thrushy frog will get too much pressure all at once, and he'll be tippy toeing around. I'd rather see you remvove the bar to make sure that isn't what is causing the tenderfooting, then give his feet a few days, then you can take a bit off the heels while still treating for thrush.
 

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After having a very experienced farrier out last weekend who totally assessed Hunter I would never try to do this myself. Hunters hooves are so screwed up (from people that have had training too). His front legs were twisted in order to compenasate for the the lack of his heels being properly trimmed. It is sooo important to have the proper care of your horses hooves. Let an expert do it. It is going to take about 2 years for Hunters hooves to be correct, thank goodenss I am not backing him for 2 years.
 

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The bars are too high as previous posters have stated... When you take pictures of the hooves get side views as well so we can check his angles..
 

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(commenting on the original pictures)

Yup, your heels need to come way down. I make them the same as the "longer" area of my wall, just in front of the quarters. I also don't take my quarters down that short. You want a smooth "scoop" to the quarters, without a lot of "edge" to either front or back.

You should also trim any of the flaps or edges off the frog, and trim the frog if it's longer/lower than the walls or heels. I agree, bars need to come down some, but I don't like to take them to the sole, just slightly lower than the wall IMO. My horses are more sound this way.

That white powdery material is dead sole. You might want to scrape it all out next time, that way you can see just how far down you can take your heels.

I don't like the red line at the toe in one of the pictures (RF). I think you went too far there.

You also didn't address the heel flares. I like the "top down" method for addressing flares. The gal on Iron Free Horse web site has good illustrations.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the tips everyone. We went for a ride yesterday and he did real good. I also put on his new boots. I think he already needs a smaller boot for his flared hoof. I let him break in his boots for a few days though before putting lots of movement on him.

I've also been treating the thrush with the petes goo on all four hooves.

Honestly I haven't lowered the bars yet because I kept thinking of this article New Page 6 . I actually went back and re-read it. I think I'll read it again today. I'm debating on wether or not to trim em. How does one know if you should or should not trim em? I'm gonna read that article again and see if I can glean some new insight from it.

I really wish I could find a local barefoot trimmer with lots of experience. I wish pete lived next door actually.


luvs2ride1979
I think that red line is a white line bruise. He has had that since I brought him home. Actually when I had him out in the pasture someone stopped by to look at him and since he didn't wanna lift his hoof on the first tickle the guy flipped out and heel stompped his hoof on the toe area. My horse ran off and stopped about a hundred yards away, looked back at us like, "what was that for". I told the guy you only need to pick up his hoof and he'll lift it for ya. Of course this guy is older and with far more wisdom than I so he responded, "ya gotta do what ya gotta do with them [email protected]#$%"!^*. And his wisdom obviously worked. sheesh that guy's getting me riled up right now. I wanted to go back to the house and put on my heeled boots and walk back out there and heel stomp his foot and say "how did that feel ya big jerk". Thankfully I haven't seen that stupid @$$ for a while. I'm kinda still harboring the anger from it.

But in a thread I started called, "white line bruise?" BFH did mention it looked like I brought the hoof wall too low below the sole. And that coulda been what caused him discomfort for a day. Actually when that was mentioned to me I drove all day so I could pick up some comfort pads and boots. It's a little odd though, he didn't have any discomfort until four days later after it became real cold. And it only lasted for a day or two. I'm kinda wondering if he's putting more weight on that leg because his left front is the one with the thrush. And one of his back ones too.

Oh yeah, also the website you are talking about. Are you talking about ironfreehoof? Or a different one? I googled ironfreehorse and I couldn't find anything about trimming on that site. But also on the ironfreehoof website I can't see any information. Is it because I need to use a different browser ya think? Or could they just be updating the website?
 

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I am just wondering what bars are? I dont trim hooves myself, nor do I plan on it. So I cant really comment on the thread. But if that bruise on the white line gets bigger or redder, you're doing something wrong with the trim, or the horse needs softer ground to stand on. The trim dosent look horrible, but it seems like the hooves arent level from one side to the other.
 
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