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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Exactly a month ago, my neighbors opened a new boarding facility that my trainer is managing and offered to help me out while I am at school by keeping him there to keep the first boarder horse they had in there company (she also loves my gelding and really wants to ride him while I'm away). The barn is just across the street, but my guy has not been himself since he's moved. He is stressed in the paddock especially in the afternoon and he's grumpier than normal. He also is my go everywhere do everything kind of horse and I tried to ride him this past weekend when I came home from school and we could barely even walk because he was so anxious and hot. By the time we were done riding the amount of sweat he had on him made it look like I had just worked him hard when all we did was walk. I also noticed right off that he was extremely tucked looking. He is drinking his water like usual, but I'm afraid the tucked appearance could be stress related and don't want it to lead to ulcers. What's troubling me is my trainer see's no problem with how he's looking or acting. She thinks he looks great and says he hasn't been stressed at all and has settled in well, which I disagree with. He's being fed plenty and four times a day, kept on a schedule, so I know he's being cared for, I just don't know if I should give him more time to settle in or if he's had plenty of time and should just bring him home instead. It's puzzling to me as to why he wouldn't settle because he's been hauled everywhere and just recently we went to Georgia for the NBHA Youth World Championships and he didn't have any sort of problem being away from home. I go to my trainer for everything and where she doesn't see he has any sort of problem it's hard for me to decide what to do. I want him to stay there, but I don't want his health or sanity to be put at risk. Should he have more time to settle in or is there more than likely some other underlying problem that could potentially hurt him in the long run?
 

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I would be concerned about ulcers also. You can give him 1/4 of a tube per day of ulcer guard as a preventative. Might be wise to do that for a week or so while he settles in.
 

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I think a month is a long time to allow a horse to settle in. Is there something at this new barn that is rattling him?? Is he kept in a stall....I would evaluate any of the things that have changed from his original setting. Is he all by himself now when he used to have buds with him? I too would be concerned with long term stress on his health; better to figure out what is making him unhappy and try to fix it; or find somewhere else for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think I'm going to try ulcer guard to start with and see how he is this weekend when I go back. He is in a stall like he always has been (and he loves his stall) and he's outside for about 10 hrs a day just like he was at my house. The only thing that I think could be rattling him is the fact that there isn't as much activity at this barn. He goes out in a significantly smaller paddock by himself (more like a traditional boarding barn in my area) where as he is used to larger paddocks for turnout at my house and being turned out with my three mares (two of which are still across the street I don't know if he knows they're still there and misses being with them). He has been turned out alone though in a paddock about the same size for an entire summer at home because he kept getting into brush at one part of the paddock and scraping his legs up. He seemed to prefer being alone doing his own thing, so I'm not sure why he's so anxious over there. He's still turned out right next to the other horse they're just separated by the fencing.
 

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The barn "across the street" scenario could certainly be upsetting him still.
He can smell, possibly see and may indeed "hear" the herd he was taken from...
A month, although it sounds a long time to settle in is not really.
He was taken from all he knew of safe stall, smells, horses and who fed him to a entirely new environment....
Horses can't rationalize {I don't think} that "this is just across the street" but live in the moment....his moment is unsettling to him.
He had companionship and comforts of home he now has lost....I would expect him to be out-of-sorts honestly.
The time though that you let it continue is something only you can determine and to what extent you let the horse work himself into "a tizzy" over it.

I also have a question of not only has the barn changed but you put it out there that someone really, really likes your horse and wants to ride him...
So what is stopping them?
Their barn, their hours, their trainer too....and your trainer sees nothing wrong with your horse that you do see and more sense his anxiety???
It is tooooooo convenient....sorry.
Me, the horse would come home. ENOUGH!!...
Don't see where it is making a difference in saving someone time as you still have other horses home needing care...what is one more???
Your horse is telling you something....it is time to listen closely to his comments...
:runninghorse2:
jmo..
 

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If the new barn is just across the road he can still smell his friends and would rather be with them. This would be my guess about why he is stressing.
^^^ This, is my thought also
He knows 'home and buddies are just across the street,and would rather be there
You could try , as test, to put your mares across from him in the new place, and I bet he would settle down
It is one thing to take your horse to some different barn miles away, where he no longer knows where home and buddies are, and to have him close like that

Another scenario that shows this facet, is many horses that are a problem riding out from home, wanting to rush back, ect, do fine hauled somewhere on atrail ride, without that 'magnet' close by
 

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stressed horse and ulcer

Ulcers and GI issues are rampant in stressed horses, they can be prevented, and if present, can be dealt with and far less costly than ulcergard. Looking all over leads one here, ulcerrepulser.com and its all natural. I know one horse that has been using this for 12 years, not only has he not had any more ulcers, but colic ended too.
 

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I would be treating for ulcers, yesterday. Assume everything else is normal?

He may also be stressed by only having one companion. I agree with the others that he knows where he is but doesn't know why he's there and is waiting to go back "home".

A month is not long for some horses but it does sound like your guy is usually pretty relaxed so there's more than just the time frame.
 
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