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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way you know of to teach a horse the barrel pattern? I'm trying to train my made on barrels, if you have any tips of tricks please tell.
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First make sure the horse move away from leg pressure, can move it's front and back end independently. The horse must be soft in the mouth, and needs a very good 'whoa'. The horse needs to be fully trained and trust you. First walk her around the pattern, going wide, and slow her down a bit as you near the turning point at each barrel. After about a month move into the jog, doing the same thing. After a week or so move into the trot. Give it a couple months before the slow lope, another 2 months or so before a canter, and then a couple months before you add real speed. Don't make the pattern her life though, do frequent trail rides, do some different patterns every once in a while, keep her flexible. How old is this horse, as well?
 

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What is the best way you know of to teach a horse the barrel pattern? I'm trying to train my made on barrels, if you have any tips of tricks please tell.
Thanks
First of all, I want you to read through this thread:

http://www.horseforum.com/barrel-racing/barrel-racing-exercises-drills-116865/

Secondly, there are many different "methods" of training a barrel horse. Hence why there are an abundance of books and DVDs from different people and different trainers that you can buy.

However, whichever "method" you follow, your horse needs to 100% broke before you start them on the barrels. I was reading through your other thread
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/barrel-horse-training-340170/
And it sounds like to me that that is where you need to start: Getting your horse trained on the basics.

You stated in your other thread that you can't get her to trot. Your horse needs to be able to travel relaxed and on a loose rein at the walk, trot, and canter, instantly when you ask, before you put her on the barrel pattern. Your horse also needs to stop softly immediately when you ask, at any speed.

You also stated in your other thread that "she doesn't do squat", referring to your horse. If you can't get your horse to do what you ask, you sure aren't going to be able to train her for barrels. You need to get her responsive to your seat and legs, and you need to get her soft in the bridle.

If you cannot afford a full-time trainer or full-time lessons, at least go take a couple lessons. You clearly are not communicating with your horse properly if she does not listen to you, and that sort of problem is more than we can help you over the internet. You need someone in person telling you "cue now" or "that cue was too late, did you feel that?" or "Perfect! did you feel how she responded to you?" You need that instant feedback from someone on the ground watching you.

You do not sound as if you have enough experience to be dealing with a horse like this. Sure, you said you've been riding for 13 years .... but that doesn't necessarily make you "experienced" nor does it make you have the skills necessary to properly train a barrel horse. This horse has got your number.

Also I don't need lessons my made just needs to be trained.
This is very incorrect thinking.

By your way of thinking, you should be able to go buy a $75,000 barrel horse, hop on, and immediately go and win every race you enter. Of course, that's not true. Yes, the horse can be well-trained, but if you don't train the rider to ride the horse, you've got nothing. You DO need lessons to help you deal with this horse. If you don't train the rider, the horse will eventually revert back to old habits. It always baffles me when folks feel like there is nothing that a trainer could possibly teach them, because they know everything already, so therefore they don't need lessons.

I think it would be useful to you to read this thread:
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/every-rider-trainer-every-time-you-85012/

Her previous owners were scared of her so the let her do whatever she wanted and she was bred to barrel race.
Your horse sounds green and spoiled. And that's showing up when you ask her to do something, and she simply ignores you.

Again, if you don't know how to deal with her, lessons and a trainer are going to be very helpful for you.

You have to get better basics training on this horse FIRST. I honestly would not even be thinking of barrel racing for MONTHS. You've got basic training that needs to be accomplished first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First of all bo you don't know me you are not better than me and I do know what I am doing my made just doesn't, if you would have furthered your reasears on me as I can tell you did you would have seen that I am a student and don't exactly have time to train my mare. Lastly I do not think that you can just go buy a expensive horse and expect to win. That is completely insane. You need to get you stuff together and out why you have such an issue with others that are better than you
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No, I don't know you, but I can get MY horses to trot.

You can't say that you know what you are doing and blame everything on the horse. 99% of the time the rider is the one who is at fault.

I did read you are a student and that is precisely why I suggested if you cannot afford full-time lessons to at least take a handful. You don't know what you don't know.

Surely you can go buy an expensive horse and win. You said yourself that you don't need lessons, and only need your horse trained. So why not just but a trained horse and you should be good to go, right? Because you don't need lessons, right?

I don't think I am the one with an issue, my dear. And you'd be better off if you stayed open minded if you expect to get any help from the folks on this board.

Not one thing I said was rude Was it the truth? Yes, and sometimes the truth hurts to hear.
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You can always better yourself! I've been riding since I was 10, im now 30 so that's twenty years. Sure its a long time. But theres a lot of people out there that have been riding/training for longer. I can never learn enough. I've taken lessons from top notch dressage riders. People that do their own clinics, and sill others that are just good at what they do. theres always something new to be had. Right now im taking lessons from a lady that has been to countless John Lyons clinics along with a lot of Ken McNab clinics she's also done some Clinton Anderson clinics. She is excellent at what she does, and I'm learning tons! theres also something to be had at riding different horses. I didn't have the opertunity to own my own horse until I was in my early twenties. So I rode what was available. Some were better trained then others. I rode friends horses, people who just wanted their horses worked but didn't have the time to do it themselves. Growing up I was brave and would get on just about anything. I'm a better rider because of it. People here aren't trying to be rude. They're just telling you theres always room for improvement.
 

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Lots of good advice so far. From your other post, you say she won't go forward. Serious question: Is she bred for speed? Just because she's a quarter horse/paint doesn't mean she's meant for speed events.

She does sound green and spoiled, but I've also known of horses to refuse to go forward with any speed when things are hurting. Rule that out. My daughter's barrel horse needs to see a chiropractor a couple times a year because she works so hard. But horses that don't work hard also can need to see a chiropractor. I would definitely rule out pain before I go forth.

And lastly, a good horseman/woman will humble themselves and seek help from a trainer when they find themselves in a situation they can't resolve on their own. That doesn't make you any less of an owner, in fact, it makes you a better owner. But you have to be willing to listen. It's easy to make a horse hate their job when the owner/rider gets frustrated and stops being clear. Have someone watch you give your cues because timing is SO important. I know when I was working with my gelding on something that should have been so easy, my trainer watched my timing only and told me when to add pressure, and when to back off and that helped so much.
 

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Beau is one of THE most respected barrel racers on here, she knows exactly what she is talking about. Don't get snotty with her! Nobody claimed to be better than you so stop being so defensive. Remember, you asked for help so she gave you help. Take it or leave it.

"I don't have time to train my mare". Okay then that settles it, why even ask?
 

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I agree 100% with everything Beau has stated. I'm in the process of training a "broke" mare. Which she in fact isn't "broke" enough for barrels.
You asked for advice and you got extremely good advice. Don't get rude, snotty, or upset. This forum is full of experienced people who will shove a reality check in your face.
Listen to Beau and if you need someone to go to on barrels, it would definitely be him/her.
 

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Start slow and walk through it then trot through then lope and eventually run, but make sure you start slow just walking and being where you should. Lots of slow work! Good luck :)
 
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