The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently come into possession of a sweet friendly but unhandled 2 and a half year old warmblood filly. She is approachable and loves to get petted but has spent her life in a pasture with little to no formal handling or training. I have already arranged for her vet care and farrier service and have experience in handling young horses. My real issue is building a training schedual for my new girl. What skills do you expect to see in the ground manners of a young horse? Im just looking for ideas to build a solid equine citizen and I want to make sure im not missing anything.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,642 Posts
Put basic ground manners on her (leading, tying, being touched all over, picking up feet) then let her out to be a horse. Keep sessions short, 15 mins tops.
Really though, let her be a horse. Throw her out in a herd where she learns how to be a decent herd member.
So many youngsters get soured by getting nit-picked at a young age. They don't need to know anything else right now. There's a 2 year old at my barn now whose owners baby and nit-pick and do tons of ground work and the poor thing has learned to hate work already.
Assess her as a 3 year old and decide whether or not to start her under saddle. If she's not mentally ready, check again at 4.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,134 Posts
Firstly, just how unhandled is she? If she doesn't understand how to lead, yield, is desensitised to being touched/handled, esp her hooves, you might be a bit premature in arranging a vet & farrier just yet. I'd also want to use a farrier who is also a good horse handler & is happy to take the time to *persuade* her rather than try to force her into hoofcare. Be sure to tell the farrier upfront about her lack of experience & that you understand if lack of handling means the actual trimming may not get done/finished on the first visit.

Re general training, start at the start, ensure she understands how to yield in all ways, is comfortable with your 'toys', behaviour, stuff she encounters. When she's able to be led/driven confidently, take her out & about, to experience more stuff. You can do obstacles, get her happy wearing stuff, including a saddle, etc. 'Tricks' are also something I like to do, to focus on it being fun.

At 2.5yo I wouldn't be doing much in the way of weightbearing or high impact exercise for a couple of years yet, but depending on your/her size etc, sitting/very light riding on her for short spells, caviletti or small jumps and some slow lunging will be fine. Along with holding off weightbearing, while I'd absolutely teach her to tie, I wouldn't tie her solid yet, at least until she's 'solid' at accepting being 'tied' in a safe way, such as long rope looped around a rail or use a 'tie ring' or such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
Really though, let her be a horse. Throw her out in a herd where she learns how to be a decent herd member.
So many youngsters get soured by getting nit-picked at a young age. They don't need to know anything else right now. There's a 2 year old at my barn now whose owners baby and nit-pick and do tons of ground work and the poor thing has learned to hate work already.
THIS!!! I want to double like this statement. Hands down, the biggest issue I see with youngsters is people fussing over them too much. I know everyone loves their babies, but for goodness sakes, leave them alone! The first three years are the years they learn to be a horse, grow and develop balance. All these are learned in the herd.

I expect my two year olds to lead extremely well, know the bare basics of lunging(circle a few times at a walk or trot, change direction, whoa), stand for the farrier, stand tied, load in a trailer, pony off another horse, and accept a saddle and bridle. This should take less than 30 days. The other 11 months are spent in the pasture.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top