The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was poking around on the internet today when I was supposed to be doing taxes wondering if there was a way to improve one's sense of rhythm, and I came across "bear bells". They are a string of bells that you loop around your horses neck or tie to your saddle and it is said to help you hear rhythm more easily.

I am sure that they would drive your riding buddies bonkers, but I wondered if anyone has ever used them for this purpose, and if so, what was the outcome?

I saw bells used in Santorini where the streets are too steep, narrow and twisted to admit machinery, to warn people that a string of horses was coming around the bend, and I heard that in the old days, rich people would have bell-makers tune their carriage bells to their own particular pitch so people would know it was them coming. Kind of like vanity plates today... maybe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,484 Posts
A friend suggested something similar a few years ago. The bells lasted about 15 minutes before i chucked them to the side of the arena. Not bear bells though LOL, they were two bells, which attached to your bag to stop someone trying to steal it.

I returned to clicking my tongue, which seemed to create a cleaner noise and i could stop and start when i needed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I've seen people use just a beaded neck rope that makes a clink or jingle noise for rhythm training. I think it is probably really helpful for dressage riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,570 Posts
I am too cheap to buy real rhythm bells, but instead have an assortment that came from various sources (holiday decorations, some old harness, and the loudest were meant for hunting dog collars). I clip them to the breastcollar using a spring snap. I started using them on trail when I rode in public parks because people were oblivious to hoofbeats or even my shouting as we approached, but they tend to notice Santa Claus coming! I still use them because sometimes it's the difference between the wildlife jumping out of the bushes 100 feet ahead versus right under the horse's feet.

I don't find the sound bothersome, but I know some do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nothing better than bells on a draft. I love the sound and it does have a very distinct rhythm to it depending on the horse/s and the gait.
Okay, bells on a draft and shod hooves clopping on cobbles. Two of my very favorite sounds.... along with the morning welcome nicker. Add in the smoke from a horse snort in the chilly air and you have Christmas.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top