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Howdy beet pulp is great. Make it well in advance to feeding it and make sure it is well hydrated. mine normally has water in the bottom of the bucket that I mix it in. I also mix it one to one with oats or barley and feed 3/4 gal. per horse per day
 

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It was suggested the OP add a SMALL AMOUNT if he was picky with just the beet pulp or if she was concerned about the phosphorus balance.

It's not a laxative and doesn't work with horses the way it does with people. Any ahm "appearance" of a laxative is due to suddenly feeding the horse a large amount of something they aren't used to. Lots and lots of info on this these days, it was becoming way overused and I think people got sick of that since I've read about 100 different articles on NOT doing it haha.

I wouldn't bother, but I don't think a handful a day is going to hurt him at all..
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Update: I starting adding the beet pulp late last week. I got up to two pounds (dry) yesterday but I think I'm going to pull back to about 1.5 pounds. I soak it until it's done, then add a small handful of equine senior for taste, stir, soak a couple more minutes, and give to him. He eats it all up. I've been thinking about the calcium-phosphorous thing a lot. The bulk of his diet right now is going to be alfalfa hay and beet pulp, which are both high in calcium. So, hopefully the very last tweak to his diet is going to be the addition of up to one pound of hulless oats per day (if you're curious why hulless instead of some other type, check this out: https://ker.com/equinews/oats-perfect-horse-feed/) to balance out the phosphorous. I feel good about all of this, and I'm really hopeful that I'm going to start seeing some improvements soon.
 

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I can answer a few questions for you.
Hot or cold water doesn’t matter, but it soaks faster in hot water.
Our 750 pound horse gets about one pound of beat pulp per day
I don’t think there is anything you need to do to make it taste better, my horses seem to love it plain.
I do about twice as much water as beat pulp, sometimes a little more.
Hope that helps!
 

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Molasses is added to many feeds to keep dust down. When added for this (like in something like beet pulp) it is only 2% to 5% of the ration. Meaning of that 50 pond bag only 1 to 2.5 pounds is molasses. You can call the supplier to find out what percentage is added. AT the 2% rate you'd be adding one ounce for every 3lbs of pellets. Not a margin that would effect a horse unless he is already on the edge and being fed a diet in sugar to high for his needs.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
@ACinATX did you find a supplier for hulless oats?
@greentree I found them here for $18 for fifty pounds, but the shipping was $42 for ground shipping (might be less for you since they are in N.E. and I think you are closer to them than I am).
https://www.cheshirehorse.com/hulle...jSgth9t6KuyyvKXIr7FNZPef68UxU85UaAnngEALw_wcB

I also found some on Amazon, which are the ones I'm probably going to buy, although they keep changing the date they are supposed to be in stock:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HB6O2GO/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_1?smid=A3B7I7491T2TYU&psc=1

Cost is higher per pound but shipping is free, and I probably don't need the big bag that Cheshire has.

In the meantime, I bought some oat groats and am feeding that in his mash.

I have to say, though, that each time I give him the beet pulp mash he seems to like it less, and the more stuff I have to mix in it to get him to eat it ("Oooh, Teddy, look, I took all of the alfalfa leaf powder from the floor and some senior feed and oats and mixed it together and now it is yummy"). So once I run out of what I have now, I will probably not buy more. Although .... maybe since he likes alfalfa so much I can buy alfalfa pellets and mix that with the beet pellets. Our spring grass is already starting to come in, although not enough for them to get by on, so maybe in another month this won't be necessary any more.
 
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I was going to come in and say Semican is the only supplier I know of that is reliable but they are a Canadian product. You beat me to it.
 

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@ACinATX once you start having to mix stuff in to get them to eat bp. The mixing stuff stops working even with feed they really love. Been there done that doesn't work. They just stop eating it no matter how it's severed.

I ended up throwing away a 50 lb bag of beet pulp no one would touch the stuff.
 

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I told y’all it smelled like dead rats.....lol!

I need hundreds of pounds of anything, so that is so far out of my price range that it might as well be a Learjet!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
@rambo99 yes that's what I'm afraid of. I remember your post on the subject. This horse, Teddy, will eat poop, and has more than once. But something that's actually good for him? Forget it.

Hmm, actually, I just thought, what if I mix up some poop with the beet pulp. Not really, but still....
 

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I know smilie swore by beet pulp for horse's. Honestly don't know how people can feed bp long term my horse's got to where they wouldn't touch it. I agree with @greentree it stinks like dead rats.

I'm currently feeding oats & allstock feed mixed more oats then allstock feed. Then throw in a vit/min with it only feed they eaten for longer than a week.

BP has a rubber like consistency between the stink and being like rubber. It just isn't an appealing kind of feed stuff. Think someone horse's get tired of eating wet feed too.
 

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Really is individual then, lol. My horse loves his beet pulp, he's been eating it for years and will eat a whole bucket plain. I use beet pulp to get him to eat other things he doesn't like.

Maybe it has to do with how young they were introduced to it?
 

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Lol. It took about a month for my horse to eat plain beet pulp (to mix supplements in), but once she realized there is nothing else, she started to lick her bucket clean...

Initially she was not enthused at all - but since I used bp to avoid the all stock sweet feed at the barn, we first had to go through withdrawal from the feed before she realized bp was edible too :biggrin:
 

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Weird, I've never noticed much of a smell coming from it. However, I'm only really on feeding duty during the winter, so I rarely deal with the stuff in hot weather. I did notice the bucket smelling a bit... cheesy... when it was warm out and had been sitting too long. That was the only time I went "ew gross" (and of course cleaned the bucket).

All the horses at our barn LOVE LOVE LOVE it. They need no incentive to eat it! We feed the plain stuff.
 

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Bp is not worth the hassle, when there are better options on the feed market to feed. Timothy pellets, alfalfa pellets. Timothy balance cubes only have to add more vitamin E and flax and are better liked then BP. No making them go hungry enough to get them to eat it...IF they even will.

Could severe it every day for months.My current horse would just walk away and go eat hay or grass. Because feed isn't there thing pally wouldn't miss it if I never fed any grain, senior feed again...

My old guy when he was alive leaving him hungry with no other options on feed wasn't an option. He'd lose weight within days. So I fed what he liked that was triple crown senior and alfalfa pellets.
 

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alfalfa has a good ratio of calc/phos, at least in my area. Grass hay gets very low in Calc. Beet pulp shreds I always fed soaked. You can find sr feed without all the sugars, Nutrena has a feed. Special Care feed. I also feed alfalfa in the am and a oat/grain hay at night. Some horses cannot handle the proteins in straight alfalfa, plus the mix of the diff hay types reduces stones . My last true senior horse (33) had been put down a couple weeks ago, he got injured and never properly healed . :( . The others are just older 18 -20 and some younger ones 13-15 stay fat on the hay mix.
 
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