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Discussion Starter #1
Firstly I do not have access to any trainers/rider instructors, and I am a beginner if you can call me that...so with that in mind I will continue...

I am getting into English riding a bit, mainly because I would like to jump my horse, and because I just want the know how and want to have some fun ...

So my quest is does anybody have any advice on getting started? Beginner Books/DVDs or tips that worked for you or seemed easy to understand?

I want to learn the right way of English riding, and I'm willing to go slow...

I have ridden horses, mostly I have rode them bareback or with a western saddle... Fire away with answers:D!

Thanks in advance.
 

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Hi there Emily :)

I know you say you have no access to an instructor.. is that just English, or western too?

If you want to jump, an instructor for both yourself and the horse is imperative I'm afraid, too much can go wrong to not have one.

Time scale, if you're looking to jump, and have ridden before, i would say around 12-18months, depending if your horse knows how to jump already.

Is your horse learning English with you, or is your horse English? So many questions!

If you have a horse that already knows english and is a bit of a school master, you'll find it a lot easier in comparrison to having to train a western horse for english.
 

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The US Pony Club Manuals are extremely good and can be found for cheap on Amazon or eBay. The books are aimed at children but even an adult can find them beneficial. I found them to be super helpful, they start at the very basics and there are multiple levels that go all the way up to advanced level riding but written in a way that is easy to understand.

As mentioned jumping without an instructor is probably not going to end well, but since no one really cares about any of these warnings and you're going to do it anyway... make sure you always wear a helmet, don't try and catch yourself if you fall by sticking your arms out and never jump alone! Ever. I'm serious! Make sure you bring a friend with you to call for help if something bad happens.
 

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As mentioned jumping without an instructor is probably not going to end well, but since no one really cares about any of these warnings and you're going to do it anyway... make sure you always wear a helmet
I'd add a body protector to the equation as well. Don't wait until you get a broken bone or a torn ligament to buy one.
 

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I'd add a body protector to the equation as well. Don't wait until you get a broken bone or a torn ligament to buy one.

If you actually read the label on BPs, it says they don't prevent breaks and tears etc but help protect against bruising.

Y'know when I told you I dislocated shoulder/acj and snapped humerus in half.. all with a BP on..with shoulder pads ;)

BUT they are good, and better safe than sorry!
 

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If you actually read the label on BPs, it says they don't prevent breaks and tears etc but help protect against bruising.
No maker will make any claims that their BP prevents any kind of injury.

Just like helmets, they only serve to spread the force of impact over a larger area. And that alone reduces the probability of a broken bone or ligament tear.

Had I been wearing a body protector with shoulder pads when I fell a month ago, my chances of ending with an AC separation of the shoulder would have been less. What ended up being a ligament tear might have been only a ligament stretch, or even just some strained muscles and no ligament damage.

All this safety gear just moves the odds a bit in your favor. But that little bit is often the difference between a minor injury that just needs ice and NSAID and one that needs surgery. Or the difference between hospitalization and death.
 

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Had I been wearing a body protector with shoulder pads when I fell a month ago, my chances of ending with an AC separation of the shoulder would have been less. What ended up being a ligament tear might have been only a ligament stretch, or even just some strained muscles and no ligament damage.
Do you suppose something like this would have helped in your case:

http://www.applesaddlery.com/p-8797-charles-owen-collarbone-and-shoulder-protection-system.aspx

I saw that last night and it's the first body protector I've seen for riding that had shoulder pads. Looks interesting but I wonder how awkward it would be to ride in.
 

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Do you suppose something like this would have helped in your case:

CHARLES OWEN INC (*E) Charles Owen Collarbone and Shoulder Protection System

I saw that last night and it's the first body protector I've seen for riding that had shoulder pads. Looks interesting but I wonder how awkward it would be to ride in.
Probably would have helped, but it's a bit steep in price for what is really just an underarmour shirt with a couple of foam pads.

Like Duffy said, most BP makers offer shoulder pads that fasten to the vest with velcro.

Right now I am waiting for an e-mail reply from a UK shop about shipping charges for an Airowear Outlyne body protector with add-on shoulder pads.

Including the shoulder pads, the vest is still less (after accounting for the currency conversion) direct from the UK than the same vest bought here without the shoulder pads.

Not to mention the fact that most retailers in the US only carry kids and womens sizes in protectors, and I am neither.

Airowear Outlyne


Outlyne with add-on shoulder pads
 

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Mildot, if you have a problem with it, let me know.

You can order to me, then I can send it to you if its cheaper that way... I was wearing my airowear all last week riding Duffy, not when the people came to try her out though.. we had a few 'test' days at the start of the week!
 

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Thanks for the offer. Honestly I'm saving so much by ordering direct that post would have to be ridiculous for the deal to not work in my favor.

Sooo...now that you mention it, how do you like your Airowear? Anything you dislike about it?

I was able to handle a kid's model at the tack store and it felt really beefy (that's a plus in my book) compared to the Tipperary vests next to it.
 

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Thanks for the offer. Honestly I'm saving so much by ordering direct that post would have to be ridiculous for the deal to not work in my favor.

Sooo...now that you mention it, how do you like your Airowear? Anything you dislike about it?

I was able to handle a kid's model at the tack store and it felt really beefy (that's a plus in my book) compared to the Tipperary vests next to it.
I hope it works out for you ;)

I love mine, absolutely. I do get a bit sticky in it, but heck.. riding is a sport, right?!

Only issue I sometimes have is if my ACJ is giving me trouble, I have a strap thing to put on and its bulky under the airowear which tips it...

The first couple of times I wore it, it felt tight on my collar bone on my dodgy shoulder too, however thats because its more raised than the other side.

It sits very snug and form fitting, and the back doesn't 'catch' on my saddle either. Or when I'm dismouting... apart from personal issues, I have found no design fault with it, and wear it every time I hack out, or when I'm having a nervous day.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK, I understand about the jumping being dangerous...Everything I do, I am going to have to do it by myself, with the aid of books/DVDs...Jumping included... My view of jumping isn't to try to jump five feet high, its to jump an occasional log/small jump. I know you don't start beginners riding by jumping, but my goal is to jump a little, but to mainly know how to ride English.
 

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OK, I understand about the jumping being dangerous...Everything I do, I am going to have to do it by myself, with the aid of books/DVDs...Jumping included... My view of jumping isn't to try to jump five feet high, its to jump an occasional log/small jump. I know you don't start beginners riding by jumping, but my goal is to jump a little, but to mainly know how to ride English.

In which case... I would get films of yourself riding, whether parent, friend etc take them, and then post them here on the critique boards so people can help you improve.. its difficult to say over the internet without seeing whats happening...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My horse is not really trained in anything particular, maybe trail riding? That's mainly what I do... So yes we would be learning English riding together...

My goals right now are to just get the basics so I know how to ride English a bit... I really am not wanting to get into it as in "All I can think about is riding English" type of riding!
 

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Statistically, jumping is on the order of 10-50 times more dangerous than riding the flats. Small jumps obviously have less risk than big jumps. However, the best risk reduction for jumping is taking some lessons. It isn't so much being told the right position, I think, as having a horse that knows how to jump taking care of you for a bit as you learn. If money is tight, even 6-8 lessons may help you get off to a good start.

My mare sometimes goes over a ground pole without noticing it. Other times, she believes it is attached to an invisible 3' jump...:evil:

Another book worth mentioning, although I think it is out of print, is Common Sense Horsemanship (Amazon.com: Common sense horsemanship;: A distinct method of riding and schooling horses and of learning to ride, (9780668026024): Vladimir S Littauer: Books).

I think riding English is a good thing to try, even if one prefers western. And vice-versa.
 

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Statistically, jumping is on the order of 10-50 times more dangerous than riding the flats. Small jumps obviously have less risk than big jumps. However, the best risk reduction for jumping is taking some lessons. It isn't so much being told the right position, I think, as having a horse that knows how to jump taking care of you for a bit as you learn. If money is tight, even 6-8 lessons may help you get off to a good start.

My mare sometimes goes over a ground pole without noticing it. Other times, she believes it is attached to an invisible 3' jump...:evil:

Another book worth mentioning, although I think it is out of print, is Common Sense Horsemanship (Amazon.com: Common sense horsemanship;: A distinct method of riding and schooling horses and of learning to ride, (9780668026024): Vladimir S Littauer: Books).

At least your horse didn't sit like a dog the first time you rode a pole...

But agreed.. a handful of lessons will get you on the right foot... I've been riding English for around 6-7years, and I have lessons twice a week ;)... if you find a good trainer, then getting the basics will help, or riding a school master so you learn the 'feel' to help transfer to your own horse.. but these all take time!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
In which case... I would get films of yourself riding, whether parent, friend etc take them, and then post them here on the critique boards so people can help you improve.. its difficult to say over the internet without seeing whats happening...
That would probably be the smart thing to do...we'll see how things work out..I still have a few things I want to work on with my horse before I ride English...But I do want to check out any English books/DVDs now, so I have half an idea what I am getting myself into...
 
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