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Hey everyone,

Soo I'm new at posting so just bare with me,
Im also a 19 year old beginner and have only been riding for a few months and absolutely love it! I would had started at an earlier age but never really had the time, but i had to start somewhere!

Anyways i know its a slower process doing one hour lessons once a week, so i was looking into Leasing a horse, Now i just wanted to know how much it would cost me to lease , how much time would i need and would i need to pay for vet bills, dental bills and farrier etc.. I don't live in a family that have a lot of money, reason why I'm not buying a horse just yet,firstly i want to have experience before buying my own horse so leasing is the only way... so if you could help me that would be great :)
 

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It sounds like you are approaching this with much thought and maturity, which I must applaud you for.
There are all kinds of leases out there and you might want to look around before you decide what you want to do. Most common might be where a barn that has a lesson program will have lesson horses that they part lease out, so you have one day where you take a lesson and one day where you are free to ride as you please. Something like that would probably be around $225 to 250 around here, but might be really different where you are.

Or, you can full lease a horse, which means you pay for pretty much everything, but then again, it's whatever you arrange with the owner.

In my case, I part lease ahorse. The owner asks me to pay a set fee, and I ride several times a week. The owner takes care of vet or shoes or such, though if he were injured under my care, I would be liable for the vet bills. This works out really well for boht of us because she hasnt' much time to ride him or even check on him and since he is pasture boarded, he needs someone to check on him regularly. I am there to deal with farriers and vets if she cannot come. I keep him in good shape and tuned up as a riding horse. And I love on him a lot. So, she benefits becuase I am here eyes and ears when she cannot be there.

If you can find this sort of an arrangement, and feel good vibes from the owner (This is absolutely critical that you feel you can get a long with the owner), then this situation works out well.

If you are brand new to horses, then leasing a lesson horse with lessons attached would be my recommendation. One really needs lessons and support at the barn at first.

Hope that helps.
 

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Spend some time hanging out at your trainers and meat the other students. Tell your trainer you are interested in leasing. The cheapest way is to find a half lease so you are splitting bills like the person above is talking about. With the economy the way it is to day you may be surprised at how many people would be willing to do this. I have several horses and have had to lease some out so they can sill get training and showing that I can no longer afford on my own.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks heaps for your help!
Seeing as i am new to horses i think the best idea would be leasing a school horse before i start a full lease or a part lease, cause that way i could learn all the responsibilities and how to care for a horse instead of getting a full lease and not having a clue how to care for it!

So what are the advantages with leasing a school horse? How many times would i get to ride him? But than again like you said it depends on the person your leasing from, I'l have to ask my trainer at my riding academy :) thanks so much for helping!
 

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Schooling horses you surely are more restricted to when you can ride but it is usually cheaper. The good thing about leasing a horse that is boarded you do not have all the responsibility as you learn cause the BO dose the major care. Good luck and have fun.
 

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Agreed with the above, I think a half lease would be right up your alley! :) And bravo for beginning riding "later" in life (although 19 is still pretty young if you ask me -- but I started riding at 26!) I took lessons once a week and half leased one of the lesson ponies, best thing I ever did! The way it was set up was that my trainer who owned the horse would let me ride 3 times a week (days that the trainer chose for me) and I would pay half of the board (which came to around $150 at our barn). Besides that, the owner was the one responsible for everything else, all of the shots and dewormers, etc.

It was great because it taught me how to tack up, care for, and work with (on my own without my trainer there sometimes) a horse before I bought one for myself! It's a great way to get your feet wet in the horsey world, best of luck to you and welcome to the forum! :)
 

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While a half lease from a trainer might sound good its still going to be quite different to owning your own horse. Even though you can maybe ride 3 days a week, often (in my experience) you still have to call ahead so the trainer knows when you are coming, and there may be other people riding the horse on that day, you won't really be able to build up the relationship with the horse, and you have no real responsibility. You aren't responsible for feeding, stable management etc. It might still be the best choice if you are a beginner though.

Although, if you are a serious about owning your own horse one day, as you advance you should consider finding a horse to full lease. In Australia the most common lease is a free lease, where you don't pay the owner anything but you are responsible for all the care and costs associated with the horse, although sometimes not vet bills. Right now that might be a bit much for you, but I would look at a barn lease as more of a stepping stone if you are wanting to own your own horse later down the track.
 
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