The Horse Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

Registered
Joined
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2 year old stallion is very slim, other horses of his breed the same age have much more fat and muscle mass. I may want to show him next year when he turns 3 so I wanted to get him some muscle and fat. Currently his diet consists of free feeding on round bales. I want something cheap yet effective so I thought the best way would be to make my own feed rather than buying expensive bags of something at the store. He weighs around 1500 lbs currently.

After doing some research here is the recipe I came up with.
2 cups canola oil
5 lbs rice bran
5 lbs beet pulp
5 lbs oats
I would give that to him once per day and he still would have constant access to his round bale. I would also get a salt lick for him so I hope that would cover all his nutritional needs.

I am looking for any advice as I am completely new to this, I just want him to grow as large as possible and be as healthy as possible.
 

Registered
Joined
7,404 Posts
He needs a balanced diet, with proper attention paid to the amino acid profile (the building blocks for his muscles) and mineral balance for GROWING horses. Have those round bales tested, put the info in FeedXL, and go from there.

Good Luck with him! We need pictures!! Please.馃槀
 

Registered
Joined
9,595 Posts
My 2 year old stallion is very slim, other horses of his breed the same age have much more fat and muscle mass. I may want to show him next year when he turns 3 so I wanted to get him some muscle and fat. Currently his diet consists of free feeding on round bales. I want something cheap yet effective so I thought the best way would be to make my own feed rather than buying expensive bags of something at the store. He weighs around 1500 lbs currently.

After doing some research here is the recipe I came up with.
2 cups canola oil
5 lbs rice bran
5 lbs beet pulp
5 lbs oats
I would give that to him once per day and he still would have constant access to his round bale. I would also get a salt lick for him so I hope that would cover all his nutritional needs.

I am looking for any advice as I am completely new to this, I just want him to grow as large as possible and be as healthy as possible.

"Cheap and effective" is not going to get you "as large asossible and be as healthy asossible". Yet you expect raise this horse into a show horse. This is t even a formula to raise him into a good working horse -- sorry.

What you are feeding is very much lacking in proper minerals vitamins, and amino acids as @greentree said.

Feed XL is a good place to start but it costs money, which seems to be something you aren't willing to spend.

Go to the feed store and buy a feed (NOT sweet feed) that is gears toward very young horses. Stay away from Tractor Supply's DuMor brand too:cowboy:
 

Registered
Joined
3,978 Posts
Generally I have always been told a low sugar/ starch diet is what is appropriate for horses and that is what I feed both of my boys (geldings however) but it's best to do research on what is available in your area.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
11,259 Posts
2 years old and 1500 pounds? What breed is this horse? I suspect some type of draft? What is his height? Different breeds will have different standards. I don't want to see a heavy amount of fat on my horses. I want them lean through the growing years and fit. I don't want them over muscled as putting that amount of muscle on that young increases the chances of break down later as to get that amount you are pushing feed to get growth putting strain on developing joints.
 

Registered
Joined
14,153 Posts
If you are raising a show stallion, this is a big money and time commitment. Do not consult public forums, you don't know what is right and wrong advice. Call a horse nutritionist if you don't have the experience to feed a stallion properly. If you are looking for cheap alternatives, you have no business keeping a stallion. These are money commitments, raising a show stallion won't make you any money it will make you broke. If you don't have enough money to begin with, you are going to have way less after this.
 

Registered
Joined
9,595 Posts
If you are raising a show stallion, this is a big money and time commitment.

Do not consult public forums, you don't know what is right and wrong advice. Call a horse nutritionist if you don't have the experience to feed a stallion properly.

If you are looking for cheap alternatives, you have no business keeping a stallion. These are money commitments, raising a show stallion won't make you any money it will make you broke. If you don't have enough money to begin with, you are going to have way less after this.
I'm glad you said that:cowboy:
 

Super Moderator
Joined
22,856 Posts
After doing some research here is the recipe I came up with.
2 cups canola oil
5 lbs rice bran
5 lbs beet pulp
5 lbs oats
I would give that to him once per day and he still would have constant access to his round bale. I would also get a salt lick for him so I hope that would cover all his nutritional needs.

I am looking for any advice as I am completely new to this, I just want him to grow as large as possible and be as healthy as possible.
Hi, firstly, from the point of view of his health & soundness, you DON'T want him 'growing as large as possible' or carrying a lot of fat. Tho from a showing point of view, they tend to like fat horses... While at 2yo he may just be going through a 'lanky phase' & not lacking in calories or such, he may well need extra fat & good protein may also be lacking, for him to build muscle. Exercise is also important for muscle development.

Nutritional balance is important for growth, as well as other aspects of health. He is not likely to be getting adequate nutrients from hay alone, esp essential fatty acids, omega 3 etc. He will not get those from a salt lick, and in fact horses dont tend to get much from salt licks, so id look at better nutrition. Does depend on what's in the hay etc, so first doing a diet analysis before working out what supps may be best.

As to ingredients of supplementary feeds, firstly, horses need to be fed certain ingredients little & often to get much out of them, particularly high fat & other rich or difficult to digest feed, so you need to feed at least 2 small meals daily, preferably more, esp if fat/oil and high starch ingredients like grain fed.

Fat/oil can be good, but it's not readily digested by horses. Should be built up very gradually over a few weeks, feeding little & often, so the horse can develop & maintain the enzymes necessary to digest it. Canola is also high in omega 6 oils, which is more often well supplied elsewhere, while omega 3 is generally in short supply. So I'd consider adding stabilized linseed/flax or such rather than canola or sunflower.

Rice bran & beet pulp are good, relatively high calorie, easily digested ingreds. Adding some copra &/or lucerne/alfalfa are also good options. Horses have small stomachs so along with consideration of little & often being important, 15lbs plus per feed is quite a bit more than ideal.

Oats are lowest starch, easiest to digest of cereal grains, but still high starch & not good in large quantities, infrequent meals or for some horses, so while that may well be best option, I'd see how he went without them, considering other options before grain.
 

Registered
Joined
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
He is a Percheron, He' about 17 hands right now he will only grow a few more inches but he still has tons of weight to put on. I know of a few of his half brothers and they were all around 1800lbs around his age, he actually may be around 1400, I have never weighed him so it is just a guess. Winters are also harsh here so I wanted to make sure he has enough fat and nutrients during the winter. I am open to buying something in the store as long as it's not too expensive.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
22,856 Posts
Being a perch/heavy breed, I'd actually expect him to be lanky at that age, as they tend to grow up before they start really growing out. Perhaps his half brothers and others you've seen have been over developed, who knows.

You do tend to get what you pay for, and 'cheap' may well be false economy. As an eg. 'Ration balancers' - high nutritional density mix designed as generic supplements - can be cheap, you have to feed lbs of it daily, they're not well balanced, use cheaper types of minerals which aren't well utilized.... or there are expensive types, but with far more bioavailable nutrients & you need to feed far less. So package price may be vastly more but value is actually better.
 

Registered
Joined
4,105 Posts
He is a Percheron, He' about 17 hands right now he will only grow a few more inches but he still has tons of weight to put on. I know of a few of his half brothers and they were all around 1800lbs around his age, he actually may be around 1400, I have never weighed him so it is just a guess. Winters are also harsh here so I wanted to make sure he has enough fat and nutrients during the winter. I am open to buying something in the store as long as it's not too expensive.
Uh, then you don't want a show stallion. There's NOTHING cheap about the feed and management of a young draft horse, particularly a stallion. Please do some research on draft horses and their feeding requirements. It's not complicated, but it is specialized, and the difference between an unthrifty-looking horse and one that looks like a million bucks is usually in the feeding program. The key to a healthy horse, particularly a draft, is quality hay. You can't just feed pasture hay in round bales and expect good results unless that hay has been grown and tested for horses, particularly drafts. The draft horse folks that show have custom hay for a reason. Draft horses are not cheap. Their feed is not cheap. Their hoofcare and vetwork is not cheap. Keeping and standing a stallion is certainly not cheap.

Drafts seem to be more prone to colic than smaller breeds, and you need to be very careful feeding them. QUALITY hay, a balanced complete diet fed several times per day, and daily exercise are exceedingly important. PSSM is so prevalent in drafts, you also need to be sure your diet is low sugar/low starch, and the most important part of that is having your hay tested and grown with draft horses in mind. Draft horses are really not something that should be undertaken when the budget is a huge concern, especially if you don't have decades of experience to know where you can cut corners and be ok, and where a corner cut can ruin your horse.

Most of the people 'in drafts' are very open to helping out people new to the industry. Please ask around and find some mentors in your area who can help you when it comes to finding a hay supplier, what feeds to purchase, and some tricks of the trade to keep your young stallion healthy and sound.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
11,259 Posts
Totally missed that was once a day. No. Just no. That is an overload for your horses system. That amount weight wise should be fed over at least three feedings.



That weight for his age is pretty much in keeping with what I am familiar with. I'd suggest that you get the best quality hay you can find and add a ration balancer to cover anything that may be missing. I wouldn't use one that you feed by the pound but one of the high quality ones that is fed by the ounce and topdress a bit of alfalfa pellets or cubes that you have moistened.





Pictures would go a long way to helping us determine where your horse is on the scale. The winners I see in the ring are fit, not fat and have glossy coats. They aren't over muscled either. There is a marked difference between a newly turned 2 and a soon to be or already 3 as the younger are leaner and more awkward looking and the older starting to level out and fill in (not fill out).



If the judges in your area are placing them like market steers then they aren't doing you a service.
 

Registered
Joined
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thank you for your replies everyone. I don't want it misconstrued that I want him to be overly fat and make him unhealthy. I actually like his slim look, but I am just worried he is not getting the proper nutrients from the round bales and it could stunt his growth. I want him to reach his maximum size genetically possible. His stomach area looks fine and you can't see his ribs easily, but he has a narrow chest, pelvis area, and neck where it looks like there should be more fat and muscle. Especially in his neck since he is a stallion. I will look into getting him some better hay as start. But that will be a month when his old hay is gone. Besides good hay what else should he have for a balanced nutrient rich diet?

I will get an up to date picture of him in within a few days when it stops raining and snowing.
 

Registered
Joined
5,323 Posts
I can't help on specialized feeding of draft horses. What I can say is at two, he is still a baby. Teenage boys do not look like men either no matter how much you feed them. Give the boy a chance to grow before you start worrying about it. He can easily be ruined with too much of the wrong foods.

That colt will probably be growing and filling in until he's about 7 years old.
 
  • Like
Reactions: loosie

Super Moderator
Joined
11,259 Posts
It'll be a while yet before he fills out. They stay lean if they aren't fattened up and over developed like halter horses in some breeds. Late 4 to 5 before they really start filling out and as far as developing the stallion characteristics that comes with age and hormones. If you aren't familiar with what they should look like then go to the auction sites that post or the breeders sites. Draft Horse Journal always has auction pics. You'll get a better idea of what he should look like by age as they tend to separate and tag by age.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
22,856 Posts
Besides good hay what else should he have for a balanced nutrient rich diet?

I will get an up to date picture of him in within a few days when it stops raining and snowing.
I think we answered your above question already. Yes please! Would love to see pics of your boy!
 

Registered
Joined
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Hello folks sorry I have not posted in a while. The past few weeks have been busy and stressful. We also we had about 10 inches of snow that subsequently melted only 2 days later so excuse the mud, I tried to brush him as best as possible. Here are some pictures of him, as you can see he still has a very young look to him and he lacks fat and muscle in some areas other stallions have. He is 2.5 years old almost exactly, he turns the big 3 in April. He may just be a slow grower or he may not have had the proper nutrients growing up, let me know your thoughts on his confirmation.





Just a few days ago when the snow hit I finally got him some feed. I have heard a lot of conflicting things on what to feed him and how much so I am trying to just play it safe until I learn more. What I got for him was some Triple Crown Growth, it is kind of pricey so I also added in some beet pulp and oats to help ration it out. I also got him a bucket full of minerals and vitamins that he licks, it says it is for growing horses.

His current mix I give him is as follows:

10 alfalfa cubes soaked and mashed
2 lbs beet pulp pellets soaked and mashed
2 lbs Triple Crown Growth
1 lb oats
And a little canola oil drizzled on top, about 1/2 cup

In total his feed raw comes out to 5-6 lbs, and when the water is added it goes to about 10lbs. Now I understand why 15lbs would have been too much, that probably would have filled 2 whole buckets and weighed 30 lbs when soaked! As I said I just wanted to play it safe, so I just went with around 5 lbs of feed to start off. Please let me know what you think of this diet for him, I am open to changing anything about it. He still has 24/7 access to hay.





 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top