The Horse Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi , I have been riding 18 months. I am new to jumping and cross country. 2 days ago my horse jammed on the brakes just before a ditch ( and actually went into reverse) and I nosedived into the ditch. Thanks goodness for helmets and back protectors- I only got bruises) But it knocked my confidence around
1111687
. I realize this can happen in front of jumps too. I would like to know how to prevent this happening again. Or at least pick up the signs early so I can do something before I fly thanks Rod 馃榾
 

Banned
Joined
36 Posts
Hi , I have been riding 18 months. I am new to jumping and cross country. 2 days ago my horse jammed on the brakes just before a ditch ( and actually went into reverse) and I nosedived into the ditch. Thanks goodness for helmets and back protectors- I only got bruises) But it knocked my confidence around. I realize this can happen in front of jumps too. I would like to know how to prevent this happening again. Or at least pick up the signs early so I can do something before I fly thanks Rod 馃榾
If a horse feels that you may be hesitant, then they might refuse. Also, I heard if you get into the jumping position too soon, then some horses get confused or think you might fall and refuse. Some riders tend to get into jumping position before the horse is ready to jump or before they get into the right distance with the obstacle. Leaning forward too much before the horse gets into jumping position can cause confusion for him and he may end up refusing. Some horses may even think you are falling off, so they stop. Try to get into the jumping position at the right moment and observe the distance. Remember that horses can be unpredictable, so try to be prepared, but not tense or uncertain. Also, my trainer said to try to sit back because that is what will save you from falling forward. I hope that helps, and I'm glad you're okay. Good luck!
 

Registered
Joined
2,990 Posts
The problem is speed related. My first horse would speed up to the jump only to slam on the breaks at the last second (dumped me twice at a horse show). Same fence everyone else's horses were refusing.

Anyhow. Slow your horse down. Trot the fence or ditch if you can. Don't gallop blindly at obstacles if you aren't certain your horse is confident enough to jump them. And practice.

I'm surprised you have done as well as you have. 18 months is not a long time to be riding.
 

Registered
Joined
100 Posts
Try to keep your seat as stable as possible, and keep weight in your stirrups with legs braced. This should help you move with the horse if this happens again.

Also try applying a little leg before an obstacle to encourage your horse to go over it.

Best of luck!
 

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If a horse feels that you may be hesitant, then they might refuse. Also, I heard if you get into the jumping position too soon, then some horses get confused or think you might fall and refuse. Some riders tend to get into jumping position before the horse is ready to jump or before they get into the right distance with the obstacle. Leaning forward too much before the horse gets into jumping position can cause confusion for him and he may end up refusing. Some horses may even think you are falling off, so they stop. Try to get into the jumping position at the right moment and observe the distance. Remember that horses can be unpredictable, so try to be prepared, but not tense or uncertain. Also, my trainer said to try to sit back because that is what will save you from falling forward. I hope that helps, and I'm glad you're okay. Good luck!
Thank you so much, that is such great advise and SO helpful 馃榾馃榾
 

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The problem is speed related. My first horse would speed up to the jump only to slam on the breaks at the last second (dumped me twice at a horse show). Same fence everyone else's horses were refusing.

Anyhow. Slow your horse down. Trot the fence or ditch if you can. Don't gallop blindly at obstacles if you aren't certain your horse is confident enough to jump them. And practice.

I'm surprised you have done as well as you have. 18 months is not a long time to be riding.
Thanks 4horses - great advice. You can be certain I will be doing what you recommend. It makes a lot of sense. Thanks for your encouragement ! 馃榾馃榾
 

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Try to keep your seat as stable as possible, and keep weight in your stirrups with legs braced. This should help you move with the horse if this happens again.

Also try applying a little leg before an obstacle to encourage your horse to go over it.

Best of luck!
Thanks FizAndAztec . I appreciate it so much and will definitely apply it in my jumping 馃榾馃榾
 

Registered
Joined
1,949 Posts
I think 18 months is a tad too soon to be riding a horse which has this habit. Any horse can refuse a jump but some are more prone to it. If I were you, I鈥檇 ask around and see if this horse does it regularly. If he does, don鈥檛 jump with him until you get more experience. If he doesn鈥檛, go back to basics, ground poles and cavalleti in a sand arena so that you can develop more feel for the horse and the jump. Cross country is much more difficult for both horse and rider. Once you have more experience come back to it but jump smaller jumps than in the arena in the beginning.
 

Registered
Joined
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think 18 months is a tad too soon to be riding a horse which has this habit. Any horse can refuse a jump but some are more prone to it. If I were you, I鈥檇 ask around and see if this horse does it regularly. If he does, don鈥檛 jump with him until you get more experience. If he doesn鈥檛, go back to basics, ground poles and cavalleti in a sand arena so that you can develop more feel for the horse and the jump. Cross country is much more difficult for both horse and rider. Once you have more experience come back to it but jump smaller jumps than in the arena in the beginning.
Thank you horsef. I know you are right. Great advice, thanks so much Rod 馃榾
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top