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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Why do you feel like you need more power? IMHO, if you don't have full control in a plain snaffle, you have a hole in training, something that upping the oomph isn't going to truly solve. There are situations where it can be expected that the horse will need a little "waking up" (i.e. foxhunting, XC, jumping, gaming, etc), and a bigger bit, used judiciously and correctly, may be appropriate for the situation, but if it is a day to day control issue that doesn't vary too greatly with the environment, it is more than likely a training issue that ought to be addressed.

Kimberwickes have a reputation for being a fairly clumsy bit, especially with a broken mouthpiece. That being said, I know several horses who work well in it, albeit with a low port mouth. What kind of mouthpiece kimberwicke did you try?

Another option would be a pelham. You could fasten the reins to the lower ring and have the curb effect, or attach them to the upper ring for a snaffle action.

I would steer clear of twisted wire or slow twist bits, personally. JMHO, but that kind of mouthpiece is pretty rough no matter what kind of cheek it's hanging from. I would go for a narrower smooth mouthpiece long before a twist if indeed a harsher bit is necessary.

At the end of the day, there aren't many situations that truly merit a bigger bit over some training tweaking.
 

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Why?Personally I would never put anything twisted in my horses mouth. If I was after a bit more strength/leverage then I would look into a snaffle with a little gag action (Can't think of the name of the bit at the moment) or for a little more, maybe a 3 ring elevator - You can adjust the strength.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
she doesn't have any issuses she just needs a little more bit to grab her attention. it was a jointed kimberwick, and she was horrible in it. i'm going to look at some more bits right now and post them to see what you guys think of those...
 

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How about a hanging snaffle?



I've never tried one personally, but I've heard good things about them. A bit of extra leverage and pressure on the poll, but no harsher of a mouthpiece. I would still consider this to be a mild bit.
 

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^ Because they don't have anything to lever around (I.e. a curb chain) the leverage action is negligable. PCANSW has made them legal for dressage on the fact that they don't apply leverage. From my understanding the only difference between this and a normal snaffle is the cheeks make the bit sit a lot stiller in the mouth.

Why do you need to grab her attention? Sorry if I sound like i'm interrogating, but it's hard to suggest solutions when you don't really know the problem! If it is just her being lax on the aids, then it should be easily fixed by using a clear progression of pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
she likes to stare at things, like she doesnt get nervous or anything, but she likes to stare at other horses and people, i'm thinking it's because she's sick of the indoor areana, the outdoor isnt in riding condition yet, very sloppy still and frozen in some spots.
 

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Sorry to double post, but we posted at the same time, Mya.

Rather than go to a bigger bit, I would try to get her attention. If she's thinking about what you're asking her, she won't have time to think about what's going on around her, inside or out. If she's counter-bent and looking around, drive her forward onto a circle, figure 8, serpentine, or leg-yield her from the quarterline to the rail and back... what you do doesn't really matter so much as getting her feet moving the way you ask her. If you're on the trail, ride circles around trees, do transitions down the path...
 

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see, i tend to disagree with ya'll. my horse does pretty well on a daily basis with a snaffle, however he gives a bit too much attitude. copper wire twist and it straightens up most of his issues. i have discovered he actually does very well back in a curb, however i think my plan will be to reserve that for if we're actually doing something where it could be benefiting (perhaps shows if we actually make it to any).
 

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see, i tend to disagree with ya'll. my horse does pretty well on a daily basis with a snaffle, however he gives a bit too much attitude. copper wire twist and it straightens up most of his issues. i have discovered he actually does very well back in a curb, however i think my plan will be to reserve that for if we're actually doing something where it could be benefiting (perhaps shows if we actually make it to any).
There are quite a few people on this board who believe in keeping a horse attentive to the bit that way--by schooling for a few days in a tougher bit, and then switching back to their normal, more basic bit for everyday things. As long as it is not a permanent fix for some under lying problem...like running through the bit, not coming in to frame, etc. there isn't generally a problem in riding this way.
 

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I have no problem with schooling in a tougher bit - I have found going to a curb for a few days does wonders for Bundy.

All I was saying is that it's my personal preference to never put anything twisted or not smooth on my horses mouth. I don't really care if they work well or not - I just don't want to.
 

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different strokes for different folks, wild spot.

likely for ME a wire twist is a daily rider while a curb would be an attention getter or special occasion. i don't know for sure yet, i'm still on a learning curve here. we've got a 2 day trail coming in a couple months so i'm going to take extra equipment with me to see what happens.

what really got him in a wire twist the first time was his DISRESPECT, and that's what taught him to back. he backs fine now in a snaffle, too. or a hack, i was surprised how well he did.

and that i know of it's not to hide any issues, he's never run off on me or anything like that.
 

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^ Of course, that's what I was saying above. Everyone has different opinions on bits.

My everyday bit is a loose ring lozenge double jointed snaffle. About as mild as you can get :] I've put the curb on him a few times because I was curious, and found that it really lightened him up for the turns and stops we do in a snaffle.

I would have no issue going to something stronger to help solve a particular issue I might have (But not permanently) but as I said above, it is just my choice to stick with smooth mouthpieces as I personally don't like the idea of a slow twist, twisted wire, corkscrew etc.
 

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Twisted anything makes me cringe. I've seen them overused with heavy, unforgiving, yanking hands so many times. Sometimes I just want to puke.
 

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for me the heavy hands are not necessary. i've been guilty of that before and worked through a lot of it. this horse in particular isn't one to really need a heavy hand, the twist just gives a bit more cause to pay attention.

i'd use something like a tom thumb, but when i tried one on him, he ABSOLUTELY did not pay attention. it was weird. he actually pays more attention to a loose ring snaffle. it's the one bit that i've used that just didn't accomplish a thing.
 

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There are quite a few people on this board who believe in keeping a horse attentive to the bit that way--by schooling for a few days in a tougher bit, and then switching back to their normal, more basic bit for everyday things. As long as it is not a permanent fix for some under lying problem...like running through the bit, not coming in to frame, etc. there isn't generally a problem in riding this way.
This is not mine but I agree with it

The practice of using a stronger bit to lighten a horse up and then switching back to a milder bit for every day riding, works really well to preserve the horse’s mouth while keeping him working right
 
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