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A lot of people will have there own opinions which is what I want, but, let me say this. I have a horse who is now 7 years old. I have tried different bits with her for CONSISTENT amounts of time because I know many people just try it for a short period and just say, “eh it’s not working” and move on but she just never seems to take a liking to any. A snaffle for example, she will just keep her head low consistently and just doesn’t seem to listen to it well. She has had her teeth done! So that is not the issue! Now I tried a bosal and it seems like she overreacts to that. She will turn great but I notice that she will like toss her head occasionally and almost act like it’s hurting her? When I really don’t believe it is. I’ve changed the positioning of it, lengthened, and shortened the mecate reins to try and find a “sweet spot” that she likes but it never seems to work. I will say that when I ride her in just a super thin shipping halter and an old lead rope, she does great. It was the best she had ever done when I rode. So what I’m mainly getting at is, should I try a hackamore? One that is thinner and with a rope noseband? Or what are your thoughts?
 

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Majority of times, when a horse is fussy in its mouth, it is the hands holding the reins.

No one likes to think that they are heavy handed and make statements that they have light hands and then put a video up showing that they not keeping an even contact, hands are moving as they post, stiffness in their wrists or arms.

Unless a problem can be seen, answers are difficult to give.

Borrow a hackamore and see how she goes before purchasing.
 

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A bosal has waaaaay more going on than most people realize.

The width of the bosal, the material it's made of, the number of plaits, the way the mecate is tied, the weight of the mecate, the material of the mecate, the height of the bosal hanger, the way it's positioned on your horse's nose, the length of the nose button, the length of the bosal, the way you hold your reins, all contribute to the way your horse responds to the bosal. No offense, but how much did you pay for your bosal? A decent bosal will run you several hundred dollars easy, and that's just the bosal - not the mecate, not the hanger, just the bosal. Softer bosals, those with thicker width or more plaits or made of leather, will run you more. A nice 60 plait 5/8" bosal can run upwards of $500. In my experience, any bosal less than $150 or so is very rough. The rawhide is of poor quality, usually, with fewer plaits that will easily rub your horse's face and very weird balance that will affect the refinement of the bosal.

Also, if you didn't shape the bosal when you bought it, it is most likely uncomfortable for your horse to wear. When you bring home the bosal it should be sized to your horse's face and put on the shaper for a few months until it fits him well. And if you leave the mecate tied when you hang the bosal after every ride, don't do that either. It can kink the mecate (if you've got a mohair or mane hair mecate) and can bend the nose button of the bosal, messing up the fit. It's better to completely remove the mecate after every ride and retie it for every ride, to preserve the fit and life of both the bosal and the mecate.

And don't get me started on the way to properly use a bosal - that's a whole 'nother animal. They were designed to be the first part of the bridle system, and as such are meant to be a tool to keep your horse as light as possible. With the bosal, it's all about refinement. It is not meant to be used with a steady pull, but rather a bumping motion. To turn, pick up your rein softly and bump, bump, bump until the turn is achieved (unless your horse neck reins, which is of course the goal). To stop, pick up your reins softly and hold one, and with the other bump, bump, bump until the horse stops. Every motion should be about finding lightness, every motion should be about refining.

It takes a lot of time and feel to get a horse going well in the bosal. It takes a special kind of riding. It also takes training, on your part and your horse's. If you are unable or unwilling to do any of that, I recommend a different bit or bitless setup for you both.

-- Kai
 

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A bosal has waaaaay more going on than most people realize.

The width of the bosal, the material it's made of, the number of plaits, the way the mecate is tied, the weight of the mecate, the material of the mecate, the height of the bosal hanger, the way it's positioned on your horse's nose, the length of the nose button, the length of the bosal, the way you hold your reins, all contribute to the way your horse responds to the bosal. No offense, but how much did you pay for your bosal? A decent bosal will run you several hundred dollars easy, and that's just the bosal - not the mecate, not the hanger, just the bosal. Softer bosals, those with thicker width or more plaits or made of leather, will run you more. A nice 60 plait 5/8" bosal can run upwards of $500. In my experience, any bosal less than $150 or so is very rough. The rawhide is of poor quality, usually, with fewer plaits that will easily rub your horse's face and very weird balance that will affect the refinement of the bosal.

Also, if you didn't shape the bosal when you bought it, it is most likely uncomfortable for your horse to wear. When you bring home the bosal it should be sized to your horse's face and put on the shaper for a few months until it fits him well. And if you leave the mecate tied when you hang the bosal after every ride, don't do that either. It can kink the mecate (if you've got a mohair or mane hair mecate) and can bend the nose button of the bosal, messing up the fit. It's better to completely remove the mecate after every ride and retie it for every ride, to preserve the fit and life of both the bosal and the mecate.

And don't get me started on the way to properly use a bosal - that's a whole 'nother animal. They were designed to be the first part of the bridle system, and as such are meant to be a tool to keep your horse as light as possible. With the bosal, it's all about refinement. It is not meant to be used with a steady pull, but rather a bumping motion. To turn, pick up your rein softly and bump, bump, bump until the turn is achieved (unless your horse neck reins, which is of course the goal). To stop, pick up your reins softly and hold one, and with the other bump, bump, bump until the horse stops. Every motion should be about finding lightness, every motion should be about refining.

It takes a lot of time and feel to get a horse going well in the bosal. It takes a special kind of riding. It also takes training, on your part and your horse's. If you are unable or unwilling to do any of that, I recommend a different bit or bitless setup for you both.

-- Kai
^^I second this. There is way much more than meets the eye when it comes to a bosal. I started learning how to use one about a year ago. Like Kai stated, learning how to use a bosal is a whole 'nother level.
 

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You're welcome to try a mechanical hackamore.

I would have you note, though, that a narrow, rope nosebanf can be more harsh than a wide, flat leather noseband.
 

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1. Have her palette and tongue thickness been checked? Oftentimes horses that just don’t like bits have thick tongues or low palettes and need a bit to accommodate those issues:)

2. I have had two horses in my life that went better with a mechanical hackamore than a bit. I use the wide leather nose bands and they have to set in the correct position as it’s not too difficult to break a horse’s nose, plus the poll can also be affected by too much pressure.

3. Ditto what @Foxhunter said. It’s amazing the people who think they have light hands and they don’t.

3.1. As other previous poster have commented, one can really get into big trouble using a hackamore with heavy hands, so be absolutely certain your hands are not the issue:)
 
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