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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone own a horse that's blind in one eye?
In your opinion, how does it affect their life?
 

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One eyed blindness

I owned a show horse with only one eye for many years. We retired her and only rode her on trails, but she did very well. The only thing I ever had to really watch was the kids being on the ground on that side. She might not see them and hit them with her head. Otherwise, she adjusted very well. We even drove her with a cart. She lived to be 32 years old and then lost sight in her other eye. We had her for another year, completely blind. I don't recommend this for very long. It is just not fair when they are this old. We loved her and she was a great horse despite her disability. Don't underestimate the horse's ability to adapt and thrive.
 

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me and another girl here are sharing a horse right now. if she sems this thread she will probably reply as well. but the Appaloosa mare is pregnant as of right now and she blind in one eye. and when we first bought her we rode her by a BIG fan on her blind side and it didn't bother her a bit. we also rode her between to closely parked cars and she didn't mind. but she has been blind in that eye for over 9 years easily. i also think she may be going deaf or something. i was on her blind side and was talkign to her and when i touched her face it scared her to death. so make sure you always approach from the non blind side and work your way around unless you make sure they hear you loud and clear. i took one of the pictures standing directly behind her rear. and the one with me riding. i was riding in the dark and in the snow. and it was only the 2nd time i had ever ridden her. and she did fantastic even bareback.

there is also to be known completely blind horses to compete and horses that are blind in one eye to still compete in shows and such.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, I don't think it's fair to them either, but I can understand how attached you can get to them.

I've seen a few people try to find homes for totally blind horses. I don't think that's fair either, to take them from familiar surroundings and put them in a strange place when they are totally blind. Unless of course it's an emergency or a rescue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's amazing! I don't know how they can compete like that. They must really have super senses. Maybe I'm under estimating their abilities.
 

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yeah here is a website. i think this horse is fully blind.
A guide to loving and caring for blind horses
and another
Blind horse to compete in horse show Oct. 13 | The Honolulu Advertiser | Hawaii's Newspaper
and according to some people blind horses make trail horses!
"what they don't see going, they'll see comming back!" lol
Behind the Bit: Blind horses: Trust makes anything possible
here is one that was in the news
Girl, blind horse inspire: News24: SouthAfrica: News
here is a video of a blind horse jumping. now it is only 6 inches but that is still awesome.
my horse with two perfectly good eyes wont even do this.
ok last one i promise. you get the point.
you can do anything with a blind horse. with enough training and trust.

and here are some rescues for blind horses.
Flurry's Hope
HorseNet Horse Rescue
i know there is more and there is also an awesome video of a family who started a rescue specifically for blind horses but i can't seem to find it.
 

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I owned an appy that went blind in her right eye - she was about 20. The eye had that cloudy look, but otherwise was healthy. She was totally fine and you could ride her and you'd never know she was blind.
 

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the horse I was leasing for a while ( I got my own horse but still ride the other one for fun sence there at the same place) he was half blind for most of his life due to getting punctured in it. he still did everything from trail riding, barrel racing, speed events. to anything English including jumping. hes just a tad more hesitiant with that eye towards the middle. the horse I bought (5 years old) recentally went blind in his right eye and doesn't seam to phase him hes just more hesitiant with that eye in when were doing training sessions. id persornally rather own horses like that instead one ones with full sight because I find it more different
 

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I grew up on my pony Cherokee who is blind in his right eye. He was injured many years before i started riding him so he was already well adjusted to not seeing in that eye. Even without that eye to see he is an amazing pony. It doesnt really hinder him at all. He is just more careful with that side. I showed him in 4h, did bunch of gaming, rode him all over the place. He trusted me not to steer him into anything on that side and in return he took good care of me. Couldnt have asked for a better pony to grow up on. :)
 

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I suppose that completely depends on the horse's temperament. I owned a mare who had a bit of attitude to start, and when she went blind, that attitude magnified. She became extremely spooky and would bolt at that drop of a hat!
 

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My horse right now that I am riding/maybe buying only has one eye and I show him in the hunters. I just posted a bunch of pics from our last show that we wanted here if you want to check out how he looks: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-pictures/first-show-29-a-447122/#post5800466 we won the show in a pretty big class of fully seeing horses haha.

The one benefit he has is that he was born without the eye so he doesn't know anything different than his vision that he has. So he is perfectly functional. The only issue is you have to be careful leading him if there are hanging buckets or something he can bump his head. And he will sometimes step on your feet since it is his left eye that is missing.
 

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We have a QH gelding who, due to an injury in the pasture, lost an eye. He wasn't spooky to being with, but didn't get any worse with the loss of the eye. He is a wonderful horse. The only thing is, if you are brushing that side of his head/neck you need to let him know you are coming, which is understandable. They seem to adjust very well.
 

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My older guy is blind in one eye due to an accident a couple years ago. He was very ridible until he foundered. He's a sweet lovable guy and lives a fairly normal life with his pasture buddies.
 

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My horse Gizmo had moon blindness in one eye. I don't know how long he had had it when I bought him but he was the best horse I have ever had. I rode him everywhere. On trails through water over bridges, everything. He was even goon in traffic. He only even spooked at some turkeys but even full sighted horses will do that.
In Novemember we found out that he had a tumor in his other eye and only had about 90% vision. So I retired him and got him a minature horse for a companion so he could smell and know where she was and fallow her that way. I still rode him bareback in the pen occasionally.
Then in late February he ended up getting a ulcer in his moonblind eye. We tried to battle it but unfourtunatly he tumor has spread and was stopping it from healing so I made the decision to but him to sleep. Hardest thing I have ever done but it was for the best for him. He was in a lot of pain.
Despite being blind he was the best horse I ever had and I would let anyone ride him, beginners and small children. And he knew and took care of his rider. He would move so slow when he knew he had a child on his back.
 

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I own a 12 year old Thoroughbred mare that is totally blind in both eyes. I still barrel race her. She seems to have become less spooky since going blind at the age of 6.
 

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I just sold one, and he was a multi world champion youth all around horse with it. Since he was a paint, most didnt notice and thought the blue was a normal partial blue eye, but it was actually an old injury that someone waited days before calling in a vet. I currently have a 1D NBHA running horse, that is blind in one eye. My daughter has to be at the top of her game, so she doesnt crash him into a barrel, but he runs as hard as the rest of them.
 
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