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I've always given my girls the 4.4lb Himalayan Rock Salt on the rope and tie up in their stall and replace it as needed. I've noticed one goes through it much faster than the other and as we are entering winter I was starting to wonder if loose salt may be a better idea?

Just wondering what you all tend to prefer as there aren't too many other horse folk around me to ask!
 

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Truth or fiction, equestrians are offered many things supposed to be good to give our animals.. but are they?
Recently there was a thread here about this kind of salt and the adverse effects on horses it can have.
I truly don't know, but that above thread and story is enough to make me very concerned.
Do some research, dig for some factual answers and truth not take a hyped and advertising strategy to separate you from your money and alter your horses health or riding career.

For me, I am not spending that kind of money for salt on a rope.
My horses have a 50 pound white salt block they are always free to lick. The block costs around $6.00
I no longer offer mineral salt cause mine just don't use it, it melts in humidity and is wasted....aside from they would spend near all day having to lick that block to consume the amount of minerals daily they need.
Salt licks are abrasive to their tongue and can only imagine standing licking for hours the tongue could become irritated and sore. :confused:

If you are concerned with salt intake not being enough...don't guess..
Get out the measuring spoons and add a specific amount based on their size to the horses feed daily.
No iodized or enriched salt, just plain salt you can buy by the bag from the feed store...apply to their feed and feed them.
They don't need a lot or you will taint their feed taste and put them off their food..
I daily give a measured salt to my horses, especially in winter so they drink more...that and I often offer them warm feed soaked with water on a cold day. 馃槈
Good luck.
馃惔 ...
 

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I followed that himalayan salt thread and there was no diagnosis of death, so if it was the salt there's no proof.

I think himalayan salt is an overpriced gimmick.

I give loose mineralized, loose white, and block white. They like the white stuff, both kinds. In winter when I start feeding warm mash, I mix salt in, not very much. It is mostly to keep them drinking water so they don't get dehydrated and colic.

Winters of course vary. I live in New England, real winter, though not nearly as cold as the interior north of North America. In California I fed the same year around.
 

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I do both:)

i鈥榲e had horses who love the salt block and others not so much.

My remaining two horses are divided on the subject, lollol

I add about a teaspoon of salt daily to the feed pan of the horse who doesn鈥檛 lick his salt block as much and about a half teaspoon daily to the feed pan of the one who is heavy sweater and really goes after his salt block.

I buy sea salt at the grocery store 鈥 non-iodized for the horses, iodized for us. Sea salt tends to have a bit of a sweet taste and we all like it.

If you feed your horses any sort of feed, they are also getting some salt from the feed. I

A lot of folks free-feed loose salt but you have to have some place out of the weather to do that, so it stays dry. Where I live, I would have to have 50:50 rice and salt to keep the salt dry 鈥 we live in the land of high humidity:)

My only caution is to be careful adding too much salt at one time and don鈥檛 build up to 鈥渕ore is better鈥 as you don鈥檛 want them to get loose bowels from too much salt:)

Also FWIW I only use pure white cow salt blocks as I have one metabolic horse and the other a much-too-easy-keeper to feed mineral blocks.
 
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I wouldn't use Himalayan salt. In fact, I just bought my horse a completely plain white salt block. She gets the other minerals she needs in her ration balancer, which I've just changed to Amino Trace + to see if it helps her feet and her muscle tone. Too much iron is bad for their hoof quality, and since Himalayan salt has an increased iron content, I think the disadvantages of it could outweigh the supposed advantages.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh goodness! I'll have to do more research on the Himalayan Salt block and read through that thread. I remember back when I boarded my girls the other owners swore by it. Good reminder to always do your own research!

I live in the Northeast so the winters do get quite cold and windy. I'm thinking I'll do something similar to what you all do in giving them multiple options. I just want to make sure they are drinking enough throughout the winter.

Thanks for the insight!
 

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I couldn't decide after reading the other thread so I basically alternate every other day using both himalayan and iodized salt loose, a teaspoon a day split across two feeds. A cautious amount for her huge size and weight @ 650kg. I use the same salts for my own cooking and seasoning so did my best to buy from a sustainable/reputable source and for human consumption. I figure a bit of variance can't hurt :p If she needs a top up I put blocks out in the field and did work out the existing salt in her feed too and went further and even got grass/hay analysis. Not paranoid I swear. I keep a good eye on her poop and so far no problems coming up 3 months since I started. If we're having a particularly sweaty day due to heat or exercise I'll up it. She's a hay dunker even in torrential rain (we are 24/7 outdoors) so that's one thing I don't have to worry about at least even as ridiculous as it is to watch lol. Good luck just make sure to know your horses weight and add it gradually. I think the himalayan issue must have been with that batch or there was an adverse reaction but something to keep us on our toes for sure. After I was assured on here and realised after going through the analysis etc and learning what minerals/vitamins can/cant be stored ... basically getting a headache... as long as I'm not overloading her system with huge quantities or variety than her system can do its job filtering out what she does and doesn't need. But yeah, keep an eye on everything from excessive thirst and peeing and even, where possible, the quality of said pee and poop. It's like a window into their... soul. :poop:
 

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frippet I found my horses drank more and more frequently when their water was tepid in temperature..
I lived in the northeast till the last few years so get the "are they drinking enough...".
Consider a heating element to take the frigid off the water might also help with amount consumed.
If you do anything with electric make positive it is grounded properly to protect the animals from shock as horses are more sensitive to electric current than most realize...
馃惔 ...
 

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Mine have a mineral salt block sitting in the corral. When they want it, they lick it. It lasts a few months. Seen no signs of issues during the last 12 years.
 

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I do both. I put lose salt in their feed, to make sure the horses are getting what they need, but also a block, because the horses love liking it, and it gives them something to do.
 
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