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I bought this filly as a 2 yo with 30 days professional training on her. She’s coming 4 yo in April. I’ve been riding and working with her. She has great confirmation, smart, eager to please, calm, has some go to her. Wanting opinions on how she’ll do for barrels. Conformation? Bloodlines? Has Hollywood Dun it, few Doc Lynx, goes back to Tiny Watch on her Dams side.
 

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Pretty nice horses in her bloodlines. Personally I don't look much past 2 generations and try to determine much about a horse, and I'm not familiar with her sire and dam. Loved seeing the Cutter Bill on there, that is really cool. Can't determine anything from the photos because of the angle and not being straight on her side, front and rear.

That said she is a pretty horse and I like what I can see from the photos. When everything else checks out I allow myself to get sucked in by color and she is cool in that department. Personally love to see clean black legs and black feet on a Buckskin.

You say she is calm, smart and good to get along with and those are all really good things for what you want to do with her. Once you start going fast with horses it is just much easier to work with one that comes back down to earth on their own like she probably will than horses who are high strung to begin with. Nice horse, good luck!
 

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While she has some nice names on the papers, they aren't real close. Obviously the Holleywood Dun It is there but everything else is pretty far back. If I were looking for a barrel prospect based on papers, I probably wouldn't pick her. Obviously that doesn't mean she can't do it, and doesn't mean she won't do well, but her papers don't jump out at me.



We need better pictures of her to assess conformation. That's a really funny angle.


So it's really difficult to answer your question on "how she'll do for barrels". Of course, any horse can learn to barrel race and it's always possible to find a diamond in the rough.



What are your goals? At what level do you want to be competitive? Local fun shows? NBHA? Rodeos? Pro?
 

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She will eventually be my daughters 4H and youth rodeo horse. No major leagues here. Would like to see her be competitive at least. She running a Arab/QH cross now and does okay.
 

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Truthfully i have seen a lot more people going to the cowbred/cutting/reining bred rejects route for barrels. I just bought a Sun O Lena Rey , chic in time bred mare for my future prospect.
If she has the heart and desire you’ll be fine, but be sure to get the solid foundation first as always
 

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Too bad the Docs Lynx wasn't closer up. I'd be more excited about that. Unfortunately the Hollywood Dunit horses tend to be the slower, dumber reiners. Back in the 80s they crossed him on a lot of the hotter mares to get them slowed down.
In your case where your daughter is looking to do some 4H shows that might keep that mare more level headed doing speed events.

Cute filly, hope your daughter and her do great things together.
 

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She’s pretty fast. I haven’t opened her up under saddle yet d/t her age but she blows the other horses out of the water in the pasture. She was bred by Twombly Performance Horse. She also has Zan It who has 250 AQHA Performance Points, Earner of $6995, AQHA World Show Qualifier for JR Reining, SR Calf Roping, SR Heading and Heeling, Superior Heeling, ROM 30 ABRA Perf. Points, ABRA World Champion Heading, Steer Stopping and ABRA Reserve World Champion Calf Roping & Steer Dubbing
 

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She will eventually be my daughters 4H and youth rodeo horse. No major leagues here. Would like to see her be competitive at least.

Really just depends on your area. In some areas, those youth rodeo horses have to be pretty salty to be competitive.


Wanting opinions on how she’ll do for barrels. Conformation?

Do you have any better pictures to assess conformation?
 
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All you can do is teach her the pattern and discover what's what as you go.

Papers are only part of the picture. They give you concrete information on who's in her background contributing to the gene pool. But you never know what got passed along or even for sure where it came from or whether it is the luck of the draw in combinations. Some pairings just click. Others not so much.

When the big names are further back and the recent havens records the more likely they were riding on the name to make money in the breeding and not that they actually inherited what it takes. You may have found a diamond that was overlooked. But when successive generations have no documented success at the level you are aiming for in your chosen discipline then it becomes a big gamble.

People get hung up on labels and labels eventually become meaningless when the words used are twisted or broadened into something that means something different to whomever is doing promoting.

The genes come from both sides not just one or the other. So you want heavy on your discipline and combinations known to click. Beyond that you are looking at conformation, heart and combination of rider and horse. You can have a horse that has poor conformation that has heart and do well. You can have a horse that has great conformation and talent but no heart. Add the rider in and there are times you'll see pure magic.

While there are some greats on the paper there's only one close up. Of his get less than half have points and earnings. Not all were blockbuster successes. Because there are so many though with points of any number that half is significant. There is so much more to breeding than just putting two horses together. There is an art and science to choosing as well and there are people that have an eye for those diamonds. Then there is raising a d training. Bringing a horse along to be what you dream it can be.

This from jgnmoose pretty much sums it up.

"You say she is calm, smart and good to get along with and those are all really good things for what you want to do with her. Once you start going fast with horses it is just much easier to work with one that comes back down to earth on their own like she probably will than horses who are high strung to begin with. Nice horse, good luck!"
 

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I didn't look at her papers as you don't ride papers.
Any horse can run barrels, how well is the wondering question.
Training and the right kind, at the right time and right intensity to be beneficial.

As for looks...she's pretty but she would not have been my pick.
I look at the picture, poor angle taken at or not and to me there is no missing the weaker hindend she exhibits because of the build and location of that SI joint.
Her motor is reduced as is her ability to engage it possibly.

But the best bloodline in a horse is only good as their "want" to do for their "they want it" and for you as the riders I want it...
Athletic horses can overcome tremendous obstacles...
We've all seen pictures of trainwrecks of racehorses who were some of the very best runners...
Horses that jumped the moon because they wanted to do it, yet were conformation wrecks walking..
We all hear about Thoroughbred babies selling for near millions and they are junk on the track but make a nice riding horse, a expensive riding horse for someone.

Its what is in the heart and spirit of the animal that makes them a success or not..
At the age you bought her at, her training level...she was and still is a total unknown and will be for many years yet to come.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Fire water flit ,all time leading barrel sire. Offspring have earned 2.9 million in earnings.

Firewater fiesta, is another one.

There are plenty of horses who Excel in sports they aren't necessarily bred for. It's called heart and desire the want too,also requires a rider that is good.

The horse is only as good as the person training it.

I know a few hollywood dun it bred horses neither are very fast. Neither excel at running barrels still only doing 3
D runs.

Just because they are bred to run doesn't mean they'll want to.
 

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She’s pretty fast. I haven’t opened her up under saddle yet d/t her age but she blows the other horses out of the water in the pasture. She was bred by Twombly Performance Horse. She also has Zan It who has 250 AQHA Performance Points, Earner of $6995, AQHA World Show Qualifier for JR Reining, SR Calf Roping, SR Heading and Heeling, Superior Heeling, ROM 30 ABRA Perf. Points, ABRA World Champion Heading, Steer Stopping and ABRA Reserve World Champion Calf Roping & Steer Dubbing
My comment about Hollywood Dun It wasn't meant to bash on your horse or insinuate she wasn't going to be fast or be a good barrel horse. Hollywood Dun It was a very influential sire in reining. While not a bigger money earner himself in the NRHA he sired a lot of money earners, still is a top paternal grandsire and even greater maternal grandsire in the reining. Because I rode a lot of them in the 90's they wouldn't be my first pick when looking at papers picking a barrel horse prospect, just my opinion.

There a lot of bloodlines that cross over to other disciplines, so many of the cowhorse lines cross over to barrel racing some don't. A few of the reiners can cross over to the reined cowhorse but Hollywood Dun It was not one of them, not enough cow and slow footed. It sounds like your filly got the speed from elsewhere and the Hollywood Dun It will give her an even temperament which sounds perfect for a 4H, Jr. rodeo horse, like I said before.

I look at bloodlines a lot. I don't have a huge amount of money to spend on competitive prospects so I research what bloodlines, crosses and where on the papers to get the best bang for my buck. While bloodlines/papers are only part of the equation it is one part of it I can "control", I can choose to buy a horse that the bloodlines are money earners in the chosen sport I am buying for. An extreme example, I am not going to buy a Percheron wanting win the world in NRCHA Non-Pro, I am going to be looking at money earners in the NRCHA. If I can't afford a $20,000 prospect, I am looking at what lines are creating winners from maternal and paternal grandsire side or see what is winning in the non-pro divisions, see what I can find for a couple grand or what might of fell through the cracks a bit. I also look at bloodlines that have stood the test of time despite quick evolving disciplines and breeding trends, for example, High Brow Cat, Peptoboonsmal, Dual Rey, Smart Chic Olena, Freckles Playboy horses(which some of these cross over well to barrels). I want to give myself the biggest advantage to myself and my horse I can because like mentioned, I can't make a horse want to do it. But if the horse has no desire or work ethic for the job I bought him for I might be able to use him for a different job he likes or he will be marketable to someone else. I realize I am babbling about cowhorse lines but it is what I am the most familiar with.

Point being, when looking at horses as prospects, not already winning in my desired sport, I can't evaluate whether the horse will like his selected job at that point, bloodlines and conformation is my best bet to get what I am looking for. After that training and desire for the job comes into to play.
 

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All you can do is teach her the pattern and discover what's what as you go.

Papers are only part of the picture. They give you concrete information on who's in her background contributing to the gene pool. But you never know what got passed along or even for sure where it came from or whether it is the luck of the draw in combinations. Some pairings just click. Others not so much.

When the big names are further back and the recent havens records the more likely they were riding on the name to make money in the breeding and not that they actually inherited what it takes. You may have found a diamond that was overlooked. But when successive generations have no documented success at the level you are aiming for in your chosen discipline then it becomes a big gamble.

People get hung up on labels and labels eventually become meaningless when the words used are twisted or broadened into something that means something different to whomever is doing promoting.

The genes come from both sides not just one or the other. So you want heavy on your discipline and combinations known to click. Beyond that you are looking at conformation, heart and combination of rider and horse. You can have a horse that has poor conformation that has heart and do well. You can have a horse that has great conformation and talent but no heart. Add the rider in and there are times you'll see pure magic.

While there are some greats on the paper there's only one close up. Of his get less than half have points and earnings. Not all were blockbuster successes. Because there are so many though with points of any number that half is significant. There is so much more to breeding than just putting two horses together. There is an art and science to choosing as well and there are people that have an eye for those diamonds. Then there is raising a d training. Bringing a horse along to be what you dream it can be.

This from jgnmoose pretty much sums it up.

"You say she is calm, smart and good to get along with and those are all really good things for what you want to do with her. Once you start going fast with horses it is just much easier to work with one that comes back down to earth on their own like she probably will than horses who are high strung to begin with. Nice horse, good luck!"

Yup bloodlines are only part of it! My Appy is pretty much halter bred and he routinely clocks in the 3D and recently we've hit the 2D at some shows. He LOVES to run and has a turn like a dream but my GOD is he lazy haha If you look up push style in the barrel racer's dictionary there's a picture of Dice right there haha.
 

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She was bred by Twombly Performance Horses. I did find that her grandsire has 250 AQHA points and a world title. I didn’t know that when I posted this. I contacted her breeder. Turns out they have a sale at the NFR every year.

250 AQHA Performance Points
Earner of $6995
AQHA World Show Qualifier for JR Reining, SR Calf Roping, SR Heading and Heeling, Superior Heeling
ROM 30 ABRA Perf. Points
ABRA World Champion Heading, Steer Stopping
ABRA Reserve World Champion Calf Roping & Steer Dubbing

She will be going to a professional barrel trainer the begaining of the year. I guess we will see.
 

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Still not good pictures for assessing conformation. Personally, I don't like the looks of her back end. Hindquarters are not rounded enough, hocks too high, and a little bit straight in the leg. And long in the back.



But as already discussed, how will that affect her ability to barrel race? Who knows. Of course, there's been plenty of great barrel horses with less-than-ideal conformation.
 
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